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NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 7, 1996
Just what Baltimore always needed most: football regalia modeled on a biker gang's.NTC Everyone knows the FBI has Hillary Clinton's fingerprints and no one understands on what.The problems of Medicare, both parties agree, are the other's fault, about which nothing should be done before an election.The Russian election turns on old voters' anxiety for security and young voters' craving for opportunity. Sound familiar?Pub Date: 6/07/96
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EXPLORE
November 29, 2013
Congratulations to the Perryville Boys Cross Country Team on winning the 1A championship. Congratulations to the Perryville Football team he won their third straight regional final. O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree. Well it is that time again folks. The annual Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony in the lot adjacent to Rodgers Tavern will be Dec.14 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. There will be caroling, along with crafts for sale and light refreshments; Santa also will be there. A craft show with Santa is planned for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7 at Principio United Methodist Church, 1511 Principio Furnace Road, Perryville.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker | July 28, 2007
Scott Gulbransen has nothing against Cal Ripken Jr. In fact, he said the Orioles great represents much of what's wonderful about baseball. But he flew from San Diego with his father, Paul, and 6-year-old son, Ryan, to celebrate another great player and good guy -- Tony Gwynn. Ripken fans outnumbered Gwynn lovers by a 10-1 ratio yesterday, but the San Diego star's fans were no less passionate. "He's Mr. Padre," Gulbransen said. "He's just the epitome of what you'd want a baseball star to be. Like Cal, he's always out in the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For Baltimore musician Warren Cherry, Frank Zappa was an inspiration — an artist who stubbornly went his own way and fought to protect artistic freedom. Sunday, Cherry and several hundred other Zappa fans went to Highlandtown to pay homage to the late rocker. "I've been a fan of Zappa since I was a teenager," says Cherry, 57. "He was just such an iconoclastic guy, and so unique. I mean, my gosh, just with the way he looked, with the hair and the goatee. I was an outsider, I was an artist, I was a musician.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Robin Williams in a George Washington wig? Uh-oh, looks like another gonzo romp from America's most manic comic. At least that's how the studio is selling Barry Levinson's new movie, Man of the Year. The posters feature Williams in full Colonial regalia - ready, no doubt, to riff for 20 minutes on the hilarity of being known as the "father" of our country. The TV commercials, full of cracks and quips and barely contained energy, make the movie look like a sequel to an earlier Levinson-Williams collaboration, only this one would be called Good Morning, Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 8, 2001
They entered the Maryland Institute, College of Art in togas, caftans, butterfly wings, even fig leaves. And they weren't even MICA students. Nope, these were 420 Baltimore notables dressed in formal wear or costumes to fit the nine different themes of this year's Art-a-Fare. The themes ranged from "It's Greek to Me" to "Old Chinatown" to "Adam and Eve's Garden of Delight." Each of nine rooms in MICA's main building had been assigned a different set of party hosts, who had then planned decorations, dinner and entertainment in that room along a chosen theme.
FEATURES
By Andy Wickstrom and Andy Wickstrom,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 10, 1993
Among the first customers for VCRs back in the late '70s were soap-opera fans determined not to miss another episode. So it's somewhat confounding, considering the size of the audience, that very little soap-opera material has been recycled on videocassette.ABC is making a bid to change that. Working with the company's own label, ABC Video, the network is planning a series of tapes derived from its daytime dramas. The first to emerge is a collection called "Daytime's Greatest Weddings," consisting of three tapes priced at $14.98 each.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
With the pomp peculiar to academic circumstance, C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. was formally inaugurated as the 27th president of the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday.Lance W. Billingsley, a UMCP alumnus and chairman of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland, officially named Mote president, presenting him with the chain and medallion that symbolizes the office as Gov. Parris N. Glendening and system Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg looked on.The ceremony came eight months after Mote took over the job, a delay not unusual for such affairs, in part because they take so long to plan.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 3, 1994
Coming up with new ideas for children's Christmas plays can be tougher than asking Santa to shed enough pounds to squeeze down the chimney, but Fell's Point Corner Theatre has taken up the challenge with "Oh, Holy Night!" an original script by Kathleen Barber.A veteran of five Baltimore Playwrights Festivals, Barber clearly had a different agenda here. The cast had to include children from Fell's Point Corner's Out-Reach classes; the plot had to end with an uplifting moral; and, of course, the play had to be set during the Christmas season.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 28, 1998
BOSTON -- On the door to my office, I have a poster of a classic "Wonder Woman" comic that dates back to 1943. On it, the star-spangled gal in full regalia -- lasso, wristlets and all -- is standing in the center ring of a national political convention.Screaming across the poster is this pronouncement: "WONDER WOMAN FOR PRESIDENT -- A Thousand Years in the Future!"Well, today no one thinks we'll have to wait until 2943 to get a woman in the White House. But we still seem to think that the first female president must be a Wonder Woman.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker | July 28, 2007
Scott Gulbransen has nothing against Cal Ripken Jr. In fact, he said the Orioles great represents much of what's wonderful about baseball. But he flew from San Diego with his father, Paul, and 6-year-old son, Ryan, to celebrate another great player and good guy -- Tony Gwynn. Ripken fans outnumbered Gwynn lovers by a 10-1 ratio yesterday, but the San Diego star's fans were no less passionate. "He's Mr. Padre," Gulbransen said. "He's just the epitome of what you'd want a baseball star to be. Like Cal, he's always out in the community.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Robin Williams in a George Washington wig? Uh-oh, looks like another gonzo romp from America's most manic comic. At least that's how the studio is selling Barry Levinson's new movie, Man of the Year. The posters feature Williams in full Colonial regalia - ready, no doubt, to riff for 20 minutes on the hilarity of being known as the "father" of our country. The TV commercials, full of cracks and quips and barely contained energy, make the movie look like a sequel to an earlier Levinson-Williams collaboration, only this one would be called Good Morning, Washington.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 2006
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat could also be called Joseph and the Amazing Elastic Dreamcoat. Or ... the Expandable-Retractable Dreamcoat. Or maybe ... the One-Size-Fits-All Dreamcoat. That's because the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical has changed shape so many times. In his 1989 book, Andrew Lloyd Webber: His Life and Works, author Michael A. Walsh counts five versions, beginning in 1968 with a 20-minute cantata for boys' choir and proceeding through the 1982 Broadway production (shepherded by two young, first-time producers from Baltimore, Susan R. Rose and Gail Berman)
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
It was hard to tell which young man was more in awe last night during batting practice at Oriole Park - power-hitting outfielder Jay Gibbons or Robert Florio, a disabled artist and diehard baseball fan from Glen Burnie. Florio, 21, looked across the expansive green grass of Baltimore's ballpark from his wheelchair and repeated, "This is amazing." "It's unbelievable," the 26-year-old Gibbons said, staring at his gift from Florio, a portrait the paralyzed artist had painted with a brush held in his mouth.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 30, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I just found out Ben is Jewish. Though truth is, I always suspected he was. Granted, the evidence was inconclusive, nothing that would hold up in court. Still, there was that name, Benjamin Jacob Grimm,which invokes not one, but two, Jewish patriarchs. Then, there was the fact that he was from Manhattan's Lower East Side, to which so many Jewish immigrants came fresh from Ellis Island. And finally, there was just something about him, something in his pugnacity, fatalism and humor, that struck me as characteristically Jewish.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2001
On the third day, the clouds lifted, the rains stopped and we began our climb of Mount Rogers, at 5,729 feet the highest peak in Virginia, formed a billion years ago when the continents of what are now Africa and North Amer-ica collided, pushing up the Appalachian range. We started at Massie Gap in Grayson Highlands State Park, a 5,000-acre reserve tucked into the southern part of the 118,000-acre Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, which is itself part of the 2- million-acre George Washington and Jefferson National Forests and about as close to North Carolina as you can get and still be in Virginia.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 26, 2006
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat could also be called Joseph and the Amazing Elastic Dreamcoat. Or ... the Expandable-Retractable Dreamcoat. Or maybe ... the One-Size-Fits-All Dreamcoat. That's because the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical has changed shape so many times. In his 1989 book, Andrew Lloyd Webber: His Life and Works, author Michael A. Walsh counts five versions, beginning in 1968 with a 20-minute cantata for boys' choir and proceeding through the 1982 Broadway production (shepherded by two young, first-time producers from Baltimore, Susan R. Rose and Gail Berman)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 16, 1993
Paul Rudnick's "I Hate Hamlet" is so chock full of theatrical jokes, one-liners and intentionally hammy acting that, especially for a non-professional cast, it must be difficult not to break out laughing right along with the audience.Compounding that difficulty is the challenge of finding an actor who can deliver an acceptable impersonation of the great John Barrymore and doesn't look ridiculous in tights.At the Vagabond Players, director Steve Goldklang has found that actor in accomplished local thespian, Mark E. Campion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 8, 2001
They entered the Maryland Institute, College of Art in togas, caftans, butterfly wings, even fig leaves. And they weren't even MICA students. Nope, these were 420 Baltimore notables dressed in formal wear or costumes to fit the nine different themes of this year's Art-a-Fare. The themes ranged from "It's Greek to Me" to "Old Chinatown" to "Adam and Eve's Garden of Delight." Each of nine rooms in MICA's main building had been assigned a different set of party hosts, who had then planned decorations, dinner and entertainment in that room along a chosen theme.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
With the pomp peculiar to academic circumstance, C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. was formally inaugurated as the 27th president of the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday.Lance W. Billingsley, a UMCP alumnus and chairman of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland, officially named Mote president, presenting him with the chain and medallion that symbolizes the office as Gov. Parris N. Glendening and system Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg looked on.The ceremony came eight months after Mote took over the job, a delay not unusual for such affairs, in part because they take so long to plan.
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