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By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun The Pavilion at the Walters, 600 N. Charles St., 727-2233. Artful dining is to be expected when the Walters Art Gallery joins forces with Classic Catering People. The new lunch-only Pavilion offers spacious proportions, classic detailing and accomplished international cuisine. Intense lobster-corn chowder, calamari with silkily spicy Thai dipping sauce, salmon quiche and fanned petals of charred rare tuna were worthy of the fanciest restaurant in town. $$moderate. (Last visited 6/91.) LYNN WILLIAMSThe Sun Bangkok Delight, 8825 Centre Park Drive, Columbia, 730-0032. Smack in the middle of a suburban green field, Bangkok Delight serves cooling food in a cool and pretty room decorated with colorful, upside-down-hanging paper umbrellas. Preparations are somewhat tempered to Western tastes. Our experience suggested one might skip the roast duckling, and turn to the minced shrimp patties, the Thai spring rolls or a salmon special that mounded salmon with snow peas, carrots, broccoli, miniature Chinese ears of corn and zucchini. $$moderate. (Last visited 5/91.) JANICE BAKERThe Sunday Sun | July 13, 1991
Plata Grande, Columbia, 740-5115. Good Mexican food, eve good Tex-Mex food, is hard to come by in this area. And when friends knowledgeable about this fare told us they had enjoyed Plata Grande in Columbia, we decided to give it a try. Despite a strong start of delicious guacamole and nicely seasoned gazpacho, the meal at Plata Grande did not improve the area's reputation much. The combination Tex-Mex platter was largely tasteless; the refried beans and rice, bland; the broccoli yellowing.
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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 28, 2008
Consider this dish a Southwestern spin on a sloppy Joe. It's just as easy to make, especially if you buy commercially prepared salsa, refried beans and, of course, the soft flour tortillas. Use the Mexican variety of hot chorizo, which must be cooked. To crumble the sausage, cut down the casing with a sharp knife and use your fingers to pull out the meat. You can find chorizo at supermarkets and ethnic-food stores. Ground turkey or ground chicken are lower-fat alternatives to the ground beef.
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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 28, 2008
Consider this dish a Southwestern spin on a sloppy Joe. It's just as easy to make, especially if you buy commercially prepared salsa, refried beans and, of course, the soft flour tortillas. Use the Mexican variety of hot chorizo, which must be cooked. To crumble the sausage, cut down the casing with a sharp knife and use your fingers to pull out the meat. You can find chorizo at supermarkets and ethnic-food stores. Ground turkey or ground chicken are lower-fat alternatives to the ground beef.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 11, 2007
I should know by now that vacation food doesn't travel well. That the chiles rellenos I savor at Padre's, a festive Mexican restaurant in Phoenix with a balmy courtyard and silky margaritas, will not taste the same when I create a version of the dish in my Baltimore kitchen. But I try anyway. As soon as I return to the grind of daily life, I am a sucker for any dish that extends the feel of vacation. That is what I did recently after spending a week visiting relatives in Arizona. On a chilly Maryland evening, I tried to cook something that would summon up memories of sunshine and good times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 1997
El Salto doesn't need the business a glowing review might bring -- but here goes. On Friday nights the place is packed; a line snakes from the front door and there's a din not unlike that of an airstrip.Slowly, since opening in August 1995, El Salto has become a favorite casual eatery of the folks who live in and around Brooklyn. The food is cheap, the beers even cheaper (16-ounce domestic beers for $1.50!). More important, what emanates from the kitchen is unlike the cookie-cutter Tex/Mex cuisine of so many chain or fast-food restaurants.
FEATURES
February 10, 2000
Bunker full of Spam? Spread it around Now that the world seems to be Y2 OK, many people who feared the worst are stuck with stockpiles of Spam and other canned foods. If this sounds like you, you could learn how to mix up new recipes with some of your surplus canned and packaged foods (see the recipe for Spam nachos). Plus, you could donate some of the goods to a food pantry. America's Second Harvest, the nation's largest domestic hunger relief organization, announced a "Y Go 2 Waste" food drive until Feb. 15. "The food is very much needed by hungry people," said Deborah Leff, president of Second Harvest, which helps supply 50,000 local charities.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 18, 2005
As spring matures, I seek the jubilant flavors and bril- liant colors of Latin America. Though a warming dish of lamb stew certainly has its place on a brisk day, sometimes the very opposite of comfort food hits the spot more precisely. Flank steak, here rubbed with spices and marinated briefly before a run under the broiler, is my favorite steak. Its big-beef flavor more than makes up for the finicky necessity of slicing it at a 45-degree angle across the grain (which renders the flank toothsome and succulent)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 11, 2007
I should know by now that vacation food doesn't travel well. That the chiles rellenos I savor at Padre's, a festive Mexican restaurant in Phoenix with a balmy courtyard and silky margaritas, will not taste the same when I create a version of the dish in my Baltimore kitchen. But I try anyway. As soon as I return to the grind of daily life, I am a sucker for any dish that extends the feel of vacation. That is what I did recently after spending a week visiting relatives in Arizona. On a chilly Maryland evening, I tried to cook something that would summon up memories of sunshine and good times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 1997
My search for the perfect mole has been thwarted again. Outside of the Mexican state of Oaxaca (the Land of the Seven Moles), it seems that a really good version of these dark, rich sauces is hard to find. My consolation is this: Even an unremarkable mole is a lovely thing.El Azteca's chicken mole is, like much of the food on the menu, pleasant and plentiful but unlikely to cause a stir.Owner Gilberto Cortes has been in the business of cooking casual Mexican food for more than 20 years, and he seems to have his job down cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 1996
Diana Kennedy would salute Holy Frijoles. Though an American, she is the reigning queen of Mexican cookbooks. For 30 years, she has celebrated the clean, simple, vibrant flavors of regional Mexican foods. And she has waged a quiet campaign to stamp out the ubiquitous Velveeta-inspired nacho sauce in this country's Mexican restaurants in favor of more authentic sauces (Hot as a Dog's Nose Sauce, anyone?)Well, her crusade must be working. Since opening nearly two months ago in Hampden, Holy Frijoles has been serving fresh and spirited Mexican food to the eager throngs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2005
This is retirement? After more than 30 years in the workforce (she as an Anne Arundel music teacher, he as a research scientist for the National Institutes of Health), Petra and Marco Pineyro decided to while away their golden years by opening a restaurant. Their retirement project, Kiko's Cucina Mexicana, a family-friendly restaurant on Belair Road, serves classic Mexican favorites, from fajitas and tacos to more ambitious offerings like snapper vera cruz ($14.95) and chicken mole ($11.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 18, 2005
As spring matures, I seek the jubilant flavors and bril- liant colors of Latin America. Though a warming dish of lamb stew certainly has its place on a brisk day, sometimes the very opposite of comfort food hits the spot more precisely. Flank steak, here rubbed with spices and marinated briefly before a run under the broiler, is my favorite steak. Its big-beef flavor more than makes up for the finicky necessity of slicing it at a 45-degree angle across the grain (which renders the flank toothsome and succulent)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2003
Big changes are rocking Holy Frijoles, the teeny and beany restaurant on hipper-all-the-time 36th Street in Hampden. Last November, the tiny 7-year-old Mexican restaurant finally got a liquor license. Now, the restaurant is expanding into the adjoining property. The expansion, expected to be ready for action some time in November, will give Holy Frijoles a proper bar, plus couches, pinball machines and other stuff designed to encourage lingering. Eventually, the menu will be expanded beyond the basic bean-driven dishes of burritos, chimichangas and tacos to include some seafood selections, and maybe a few specials each night, said owner Geoff Danek.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
If you're a big-hunk-of-steak kind of person like me, few things could seem more torturous than dinner at a raw-food restaurant. But as it turned out, it wasn't that bad. Dan Hoyt and Tolentin Chan, owners of the two Quintessence restaurants in New York, have created dishes that are varied, tasty and intriguing. Sure, being a raw restaurant, it offers no wine or beer, but the coconut drinks almost make up for it. On a recent Friday night, a friend and I trekked to the East Village restaurant to sample some raw offerings.
FEATURES
February 10, 2000
Bunker full of Spam? Spread it around Now that the world seems to be Y2 OK, many people who feared the worst are stuck with stockpiles of Spam and other canned foods. If this sounds like you, you could learn how to mix up new recipes with some of your surplus canned and packaged foods (see the recipe for Spam nachos). Plus, you could donate some of the goods to a food pantry. America's Second Harvest, the nation's largest domestic hunger relief organization, announced a "Y Go 2 Waste" food drive until Feb. 15. "The food is very much needed by hungry people," said Deborah Leff, president of Second Harvest, which helps supply 50,000 local charities.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 17, 1999
This week's menusEach day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyServe...
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2005
This is retirement? After more than 30 years in the workforce (she as an Anne Arundel music teacher, he as a research scientist for the National Institutes of Health), Petra and Marco Pineyro decided to while away their golden years by opening a restaurant. Their retirement project, Kiko's Cucina Mexicana, a family-friendly restaurant on Belair Road, serves classic Mexican favorites, from fajitas and tacos to more ambitious offerings like snapper vera cruz ($14.95) and chicken mole ($11.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 17, 1999
Remember when Tex-Mex food was about as cheap, down and dirty a meal as you could get? Then came the Tex-Mex restaurant of the '90s, where the signature dish is a portobello fajita. Prime example: the new Austin Grill in the Can Company in Canton.As much as you can upscale downscale food, the Austin Grill has done it. This is the sixth member of a Washington-based chain, but its food doesn't taste like chain food. Everything is made from scratch, so they say, including 20 different sauces and salsas whipped up daily.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 17, 1999
Remember when Tex-Mex food was about as cheap, down and dirty a meal as you could get? Then came the Tex-Mex restaurant of the '90s, where the signature dish is a portobello fajita. Prime example: the new Austin Grill in the Can Company in Canton.As much as you can upscale downscale food, the Austin Grill has done it. This is the sixth member of a Washington-based chain, but its food doesn't taste like chain food. Everything is made from scratch, so they say, including 20 different sauces and salsas whipped up daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 1997
El Salto doesn't need the business a glowing review might bring -- but here goes. On Friday nights the place is packed; a line snakes from the front door and there's a din not unlike that of an airstrip.Slowly, since opening in August 1995, El Salto has become a favorite casual eatery of the folks who live in and around Brooklyn. The food is cheap, the beers even cheaper (16-ounce domestic beers for $1.50!). More important, what emanates from the kitchen is unlike the cookie-cutter Tex/Mex cuisine of so many chain or fast-food restaurants.
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