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October 31, 2011
Networks should pay Coley Harvey Orlando Sentinel With the reforms announced last week, at least we can finally say the NCAA is no longer crawling around aimlessly on its hands and knees. The big boy diapers may remain, but at least the association has taken its first baby step. Applause for the proposed move to pay student-athletes a $2,000 stipend, and further applause for the multiyear scholarships they can now sign. The only problem is this: Who will fund it all?
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NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011
The article by Liz F. Kay regarding water bills ("City to Overhaul Water Billing," May 11) was helpful but only told part of the story. The well-known clerical errors, long waits to reach city water bureaucrats, frequent huge overcharges for water and so on, unfortunately, are well-known. One hopes Ms. Kay's report comes true and badly needed overhauling is done. However, we are still faced with the fact that water bills are always in the names of landlords, not tenants. Hence, no matter what arrangements may exist, if the tenant skips out, is evicted or simply does not have the money, landlords must absorb the bills, sometimes for $500 or much more.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
An internal investigation found that the Johns Hopkins University failed to alert students, faculty and staff to what it called "a sexual assault" at a fraternity house in March 2013, the school's president said Wednesday in a letter to campus. In the letter, which accompanied the release of the university's 2013 annual security report, President Ronald J. Daniels called the failure to report the incident at Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity's house "unacceptable. " "I want to take this opportunity to reaffirm the University's commitment to the safety and well-being of all members of the Johns Hopkins community - a commitment that includes preventing sexual violence, offering support to victims, dealing firmly and fairly with alleged offenders, and keeping students, faculty and staff informed of crimes that represent a threat to our community," he said.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
The federal government is correct to tie federal education dollars to meaningful school reforms ("Not No. 1 in reform," Dec. 22). Otherwise, huge amounts of money get spent and nothing changes. I saw this repeatedly in my 40 years in Maryland public education as a teacher, principal and central office executive director. Gov. Martin O'Malley has, in state schools superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, arguably the greatest educator in the country. She has led the climb of Maryland public schools to the top. She and the feds are right on target regarding two key changes the governor should be supporting.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Newspapers and TV should analyze the reforms needed to modernize the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. Here are five reforms they should look at: A constitutional amendment requiring term limits for members of Congress; a constitutional amendment limiting presidents to a single six-year term; and a rule requiring members of Congress, presidents, vice presidents, cabinet secretaries, federal judges and top policymakers to...
NEWS
February 18, 2005
IT MIGHT have been an awkward moment for the secretary of state with the Egyptian foreign minister at her side. But Condoleezza Rice didn't show it, when asked about Cairo's jailing of an Egyptian opposition leader. And she certainly didn't duck the question. Her strong sentiments about Egypt's unacceptable detention of Ayman Noor were appropriate. The diplomat, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, kept his thoughts to himself. What could he say? But Ms. Rice's "very strong concerns" about the fate of Mr. Noor can't be the last words on Cairo's harsh treatment of reformers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
The Baltimore County Council Tuesday night approved the weaker of two pension reform bills, adopting a measure that is unlikely to satisfy critics of the current system that greatly exceeds benefits to most working families. The panel voted 6-to-1 to cap pensions of elected officials at 60 percent of the annual salary, which is currently $54,000. The law, drafted by Councilman Kevin Kamenetz, takes effect Feb. 1. It applies to anyone who joins the council after that date, but not current members.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
Maryland education officials laid out a broad vision Tuesday for improving the state's schools and teaching corps, pledging to put the best educators in struggling classrooms while making them more accountable for performance and boosting emphasis on science, math and technoglogy courses. The promises came in a 257-page application that Maryland plans to submit to the U.S. Department of Education this year in a bid for a $250 million slice of $4 billion in federal school reform money known as Race to the Top funding.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Two-thirds of Maryland's 24 local school boards have agreed to sign on to education reforms they hope could earn the state as much as $250 million more in federal aid this year, but teachers unions appear to be far less supportive, which could weaken the state's position. All of the largest school districts in the Baltimore area have voted to sign the Race to the Top application, including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties. But local teachers unions, with the exception of the Baltimore Teachers Union, say they won't be signing or haven't taken a position.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Taking their queue from the classic movie "Casablanca," some city officials are declaring themselves "shocked, shocked!" to learn that police brutality is a serious problem in Baltimore. An investigative report on Sunday by The Sun's Mark Puente found the city has paid out more than $5.7 million since 2011 in judgments or settlements of more than 100 lawsuits brought by citizens alleging excessive use of force and other police misconduct. Three years earlier, the city's budget office also raised concerns over its spending $10.4 million from 2008 through 2011 - an average of about $3.5 million annually - defending the Baltimore Police Department against misconduct lawsuits.
NEWS
Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A new anti-violence program led Baltimore police to raid the home of a convicted drug dealer they had hoped to reform, and to nearly $4 million worth of drugs and cash, a significant seizure for the department. Standing over a table displaying $825,000 cash and nearly 12 kilograms of heroin, police officials said Shawn Antonio Hearn, a 41-year-old with a prior federal drug conviction, had been given a chance through the Operation Ceasefire program. He didn't take that chance, they said.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
I agree that Montgomery County's campaign finance reform bill is a step in the right direction ( "An alternative to fat-cat politics," Sept. 22). In recent years, big-money donations have corrupted our elections and therefore made our political system less democratic. Never before has our nation seen such vast sums of cash flowing into politics. Money talks. The wealthy individuals and corporations throwing this money at candidates have their own agendas and make it hard for candidates to focus on average donors.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two influential City Council members introduced legislation Monday that would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year - a move they argue would cut down on police brutality in the aftermath of several high-profile misconduct allegations. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Councilman Warren Branch, chairman of the panel's public safety committee, cited questions surrounding the in-custody death last year of Tyrone West and a recent video showing an officer repeatedly punching a suspect, among other cases, as reasons for the proposed law. It would require all of Baltimore's nearly 3,000 sworn police officers to wear a device constantly recording the audio and video of their interactions with the public.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
To those who follow college athletics only casually, the announcement last week that the University of Maryland will henceforth award athletic scholarships on a multi-year basis instead of year-to-year may sound like a minor change. But in fact, it's a major reform that is not only welcome but is likely to attract a legion of imitators. From the effort to unionize athletes at Northwestern University as school employees (a year-long struggle that remains ongoing) to the legal fight over whether the NCAA can profit from the images of athletes in video games and elsewhere without compensating them, how colleges and universities treat athletes — or mistreat them — has sparked a pitched battle of late.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
For the homeless, drug-addicted women Jacqueline Robarge works with, this summer in Baltimore was long and violent. Outreach workers with the nonprofit Power Inside heard at least eight accounts of sexual assault and rape, the most she could recall in her 10 years with the group. In some of those cases, according to Robarge, the women said Baltimore police refused to take reports when they approached patrol officers to tell them what had happened. Robarge's small, Charles Village-based group has been tapped to work with a city task force formed to improve sexual assault investigations.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Efforts to address the epidemic of sexual assaults in the military got a boost this week from unexpected quarters - the tea party wing of the Republican Party. Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas said they support legislation offered by New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand that would take prosecution of such cases outside the military's chain of command. That may be a controversial idea - limiting a commander's involvement in an investigation and prosecution of a soldier - but it's certainly not unprecedented among the world's elite fighting units.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Carrie Evans, the executive director of Equality Maryland, was arrested at an immigration reform rally in Washington on Thursday afternoon, the state's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organization said. The arrest wasn't surprising , as Evans had announced earlier this week that she planned to participate in a collective act of civil disobedience in front of the White House with marchers from Casa de Maryland and other social justice organizations. The event Thursday, which began in front of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters in Washington, was dubbed the #FightforFamilies march.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
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