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By Carol A. Arscott and Patrick E. Gonzales | July 13, 2000
ANNAPOLIS -- A familiar axiom on the nature of power says that the infighting is always most vicious when the stakes are lowest,. That old saw probably comes to the minds of some voters when pondering the state of today's Reform Party. Frankly, these same voters might wonder why the state of the Reform Party is worth pondering in the first place. The selection of the eventual nominee is all but assured, and the party is garnering less than 2 percent of the vote in national surveys -- less even than Ralph Nader's candidacy.
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September 11, 2012
Ever heard of the Green and Libertarian parties? I have, and the American people have a right to know who is running and what they propose. I would also like your support for them both to be in the presidential debates, along with the Republican and Democrat. If they were in the debates, the people would have a better idea of who is running and what they do propose. Question: What party was Jessie Ventura (former professional wrestler, Navy Seal, author, actor, etc.) in when he was governor of Minnesota?
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NEWS
By Tom Teepen | September 28, 1999
COMPLETE this sentence: I would be interested in a presidential candidate who: 1) would give us a first model instead of a first lady, 2) would be dogged by old photos of himself in a Speedo and feather boa or 3) thinks -- or at any rate once thought -- the United States should annex western Canada to get more white people.The Reform Party started out as a cracked egg laid by the cackling Ross Perot. This time around, it shows signs of frying itself.The pity in this theater of political absurdity is that the party never really honored the many desperately earnest folks to whom it seemed to promise an alternative to the influence-peddling, money-grubbing and slick insincerities of workaday politics.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
It's simply ridiculous for Jack Kinstlinger to suggest that he was turned off to the Tea Party movement after attending one event ("Tea party tries to sound reasonable," Readers respond, April 15). I've read many of Mr. Kinstlinger's letters in the past; he is a devout tax and spend liberal, and it's incomprehensible that he would go to a tea party rally with an open mind. Also telling is the knee-jerk liberal reaction displayed by Mr. Kinstlinger when he likens the tea party movement to the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan nation.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 31, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Pity the poor Reform Party. Just when voters have been stirred to a lather by John McCain to clean up presidential politics, and Al Gore and George W. Bush are trying to assume his reformer mantle, the third party hand-crafted by Ross Perot seems to be going to hell in a handbasket. The highest-ranking elected official to win under the Reform Party banner, Gov. Jesse Ventura of Minnesota, has abandoned ship in disgust over the party's internal squabbling and its growing image as a haven for political kooks.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1991
MOSCOW -- Nine top political figures, most of whom have close ties to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, warned yesterday that "ultraconservative forces are strengthening" and appealed to Soviet citizens to unite behind a single reform movement.Their statement, distributed to reporters last night, was far from the first attempt to hammer into a disciplined opposition the diverse and quarrelsome critics of the Soviet Communist Party establishment.But the nine political leaders, some of the biggest in the politics of the Gorbachev era, lent the appeal enough clout to make the Communist Party look nervously over its shoulder.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 14, 1996
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- At the outset of former Gov. Dick Lamm's speech before the new Reform Party convention here, he thanked party founder Ross Perot for making the day possible, observing that "I wouldn't be here without Ross Perot."That certainly was true. The convention that marked the first of two steps in putting a third presidential candidate into the 1996 presidential election was Mr. Perot's baby, conceived and implemented in his head and with his money. Dick Lamm merely picked up on Mr. Perot's invitation to run amid the Texas billionaire's continued statements that he didn't want to run himself.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE hTC | September 29, 1996
SCHAUMBURG, Ill. -- With their eyes on the presidential election in 2000, an ad hoc group of Reform Party supporters gathered here yesterday to brainstorm about how and when to transform the organization founded and financed by Ross Perot into a national party financed and governed by its members and a national committee."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Patrick J. Buchanan's expected bid for the Reform Party's presidential nomination has sparked testy feuds and conspiracy theories across this party, as some members worry that the candidate will blot out their agenda and out-muscle the party faithful to secure his nomination.At the same time, an equally vocal group of Reform Party members sees Buchanan as their ticket out of obscurity -- and believe that the man who logged all those television hours excoriating liberals and Washington politics-as-usual has finally found a home.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 26, 1999
DEARBORN, Mich. -- As the Reform Party seeks to revive its waning influence in presidential politics, members voted yesterday to ditch its old leadership and embrace a candidate endorsed by former wrestler turned populist sensation Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura.Delegates at the third annual Reform Party convention elected former financier Jack Gargan as party chairman. Gargan, who grew up on a chicken farm and talks about government reform with a country drawl, was seen by some as a repudiation of another twangy Reform Party personality, founder Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Charles S. Faddis | January 22, 2010
I am a lot like the majority of Americans, I think. Over the years I have gone back and forth between the two major political parties, never fully satisfied with either and always wishing there was another choice. I supported President Barack Obama's election and campaigned for him, but now, a year later, it seems that no matter his intentions, his party remains wedded to the same politics of spending and big government that we have seen in the past. And so - after a lot of soul searching about where this country is going and the seeming inability of the two established political parties to make the necessary changes to confront our current political, military and economic challenges - I have decided to throw in my lot with the Reform Party of the United States.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Reform Party endorsed Ralph Nader for president yesterday, providing the independent candidate a potential shortcut onto the ballot in the contested states of Florida, Michigan and Colorado. Nader has yet to decide whether to run in those and four other states as the nominee of the party that Ross Perot founded in the 1990s. But the endorsement gives him that option. Nader has not yet qualified for the ballot in any state, but the Reform Party decision drew renewed attention to his possible impact on the race between President Bush and his presumed Democratic opponent, Sen. John F. Kerry of Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Well, I guess Jesse Ventura won't be running for president after all. His decision against seeking re-election as governor of Minnesota as a third-party candidate no doubt takes care of that bit of fanciful speculation. There was a time when the former-professional-wrestler-turned-statesman was being mentioned as the next standard-bearer for the Reform Party, launched by another pipe-dreamer, Ross Perot, in 1992 and shattered by the wrecking ball of Pat Buchanan in 2000. But Mr. Ventura eventually broke with the Reform Party, and after early cooperation with the Democrats who controlled the state Senate and the Republicans who ran the state House, he eventually hit a brick wall.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The last time the Reform Party held a national convention here, in early 2000, members were shouting and shoving, with maybe a blow or two struck, and the police were called in to restore order, or some semblance of it. So when the party, or what is left of it after its minuscule showing in Election 2000, convened here this weekend for another national convention, the big question was: Will they shout and shove again? There was some shouting, but almost all in the form of cheers or exuberant debate.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - The new Democratic national chairman, Terry McAuliffe, vowed yesterday to "transform the anger" Democrats feel about losing the presidency into electoral reform and election victories during the next four years. McAuliffe, the party's leading fund-raiser, is a close friend of former President Bill Clinton, who engineered his selection as head of the Democratic National Committee. The move reflected Clinton's continuing political influence as well as the degree to which fund raising has become the main focus of the major parties.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 13, 2000
WASHINGTON -- About the last person most voters probably want to hear from these days is Ralph Nader, the Green Party presidential nominee whose nearly 100,000 votes in Florida helped produce the impasse between Al Gore and George W. Bush. But Mr. Nader, who offers no apologies to Gore voters who insist their man would be president-elect today had the old consumer advocate never run, has never been a shrinking violet, and isn't one now, amid much abuse being heaped upon him by Democrats.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Ross Perot and California members of his nascent Reform Party gave the new third party its first major road test as they assembled at a two-day conference here this weekend.In his keynote address yesterday, former Gov. Richard D. Lamm of Colorado championed two of the party's principles -- TC balanced federal budget and campaign finance and electoral reform. Lamm, a frequent and often provocative critic of what he sees as the major parties' reluctance to solve fiscal problems -- for example, by overhauling health care and Social Security -- said that with the coming retirement of the baby-boomer generation, and other factors, the New Deal had become "a raw deal" for "our children and grandchildren."
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