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NEWS
By Michael Ollove | October 31, 1991
Thousands of delegates representing Reform Judaism in North America begin meetings today in Baltimore excited by the Middle East peace conference but also skittish about how American Jews should respond to the talks in Madrid, Spain.The Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC), which expects nearly 4,000 delegates to attend its biennial convention, has long expressed disagreement with Israel's Likud government over such matters as Palestinian rights and settlements in occupied territories.
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NEWS
By Lynne Landsberg | April 2, 2008
I've been told that in my former life, I was an effortless multi-tasker, a fast talker and a quick thinker. I had speaking engagements across the country and composed my most powerful speeches in airplanes and taxis. In that former life, I was Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, associate director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, then the Union of Reform Judaism's director for the mid-Atlantic region, including Maryland. I am still Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, but the rest has changed. In 1999, I suffered a traumatic brain injury when my Jeep Cherokee skidded on a patch of black ice and wrapped around a tree.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
In the not-too-distant past, a man walking into a Reform synagogue wearing a yarmulke, the skullcap worn by many Jews, would be asked to remove it.Reform Judaism was founded last century as a leftward movement, emphasizing social justice and rejecting many of the traditional rituals and practices regarding diet and dress as at odds with modern society.But an increasing number of North America's 1.5 million Reform Jews are embracing observances cast off by their forebears. They are wearing yarmulkes, donning the prayer shawl called a tallit, keeping kosher kitchens, and learning Hebrew, all practices that would have been taboo a generation ago.The move has been unsettling for some longtime Reform Jews, many of whom joined the movement to escape what they perceived was the rigidity of the Orthodox and even the Conservative.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
Friars' seminar tomorrow to provide history of the Mass The Friars of the Sanctuary of St. Anthony will offer a seminar, "Do This in Remembrance of Me," from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow. The seminar will provide a history of the Mass and an explanation of the ritual used to participate in the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. Registration is required. The fee is $25. The friars will offer another seminar, "Your Sins Are Forgiven," from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 21. It will examine what constitutes a sin and its effect on relationships with self, others and God. Registration is required.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Religion Editor of The Sun | December 7, 1990
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, one of the nation's oldest and largest Reform Jewish synagogues, has announced to its members that it will open an elementary day school next fall.By 1995, the Pikesville congregation expects to enroll 150 students from kindergarten through the fifth grade.It will be only the 15th such school among more than 800 Reform congregations in the United States, said Rabbi Murray Saltzman of Baltimore Hebrew."While not everyone in the congregation is overjoyed," he said, "nevertheless, the decision stands as an important and historic move, which places this congregation in the forefront of Reform Judaism's dynamic growth."
NEWS
April 16, 1998
The Rev. Louis A. Saunders, 88, who performed the funeral for President Kennedy's assassin because "even Lee Harvey Oswald deserved a Christian burial," died April 5 of heart disease near Dallas.Mr. Oswald, shot by Jack Ruby, was to be buried Nov. 25, 1963, in Rose Hill Cemetery. But the ministers who were supposed to perform the service did not show, so the funeral director asked Mr. Saunders to preside.Roger F. Murray II, 96, an expert on pensions who helped create the concept of individual retirement accounts, died Monday of a heart attack in Wolfeboro, N.H.James B. Conkling, 83, who helped develop the Grammys and later became the first president of Warner Bros.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
Many of the 4,000 delegates from the United States and Canada here for Reform Judaism's biennial assembly seem to have their minds elsewhere -- in Madrid, Spain, the site of the current Middle East peace conference.The peace talks "will dominate conversations at the biennial," said delegate Karen Stromberg of Paradise Valley, Ariz., echoing the sentiments of other conventioneers as they registered yesterday at the Baltimore Convention Center downtown.Resolutions seeking to shape Reform policy on the Middle East will be taken up during plenary sessions of the 61st General Assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
NEWS
November 5, 1991
For many years Rabbi Alexander Schindler has been an eloquent and courageous voice in Reform Judaism in America, and he brought a timely message in his opening remarks to the 4,000 delegates who gathered this week in Baltimore for the biennial meeting of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. His message was that tolerant people of all religions and cultures in America must come together to resist the siren blandishments of extremists like Louis Farrakhan on the one side, David Duke on the other.
NEWS
By Lynne Landsberg | April 2, 2008
I've been told that in my former life, I was an effortless multi-tasker, a fast talker and a quick thinker. I had speaking engagements across the country and composed my most powerful speeches in airplanes and taxis. In that former life, I was Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, associate director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, then the Union of Reform Judaism's director for the mid-Atlantic region, including Maryland. I am still Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, but the rest has changed. In 1999, I suffered a traumatic brain injury when my Jeep Cherokee skidded on a patch of black ice and wrapped around a tree.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
When Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman accepts the Democratic Party's nomination for vice president tonight, it will raise questions for a public unfamiliar with Judaism: Not only is Lieberman a Jew, but he is an Orthodox Jew. But what does that mean? Will his activities be severely limited on the Sabbath? What other restrictions does his faith impose, and will they stand in the way of his potential vice presidential duties? And how are the Orthodox different from the rest of the Jewish world? Lieberman is a member of a people that traces its lineage back not just generations, but millennia.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
When Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman accepts the Democratic Party's nomination for vice president tonight, it will raise questions for a public unfamiliar with Judaism: Not only is Lieberman a Jew, but he is an Orthodox Jew. But what does that mean? Will his activities be severely limited on the Sabbath? What other restrictions does his faith impose, and will they stand in the way of his potential vice presidential duties? And how are the Orthodox different from the rest of the Jewish world? Lieberman is a member of a people that traces its lineage back not just generations, but millennia.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
In the not-too-distant past, a man walking into a Reform synagogue wearing a yarmulke, the skullcap worn by many Jews, would be asked to remove it.Reform Judaism was founded last century as a leftward movement, emphasizing social justice and rejecting many of the traditional rituals and practices regarding diet and dress as at odds with modern society.But an increasing number of North America's 1.5 million Reform Jews are embracing observances cast off by their forebears. They are wearing yarmulkes, donning the prayer shawl called a tallit, keeping kosher kitchens, and learning Hebrew, all practices that would have been taboo a generation ago.The move has been unsettling for some longtime Reform Jews, many of whom joined the movement to escape what they perceived was the rigidity of the Orthodox and even the Conservative.
NEWS
April 16, 1998
The Rev. Louis A. Saunders, 88, who performed the funeral for President Kennedy's assassin because "even Lee Harvey Oswald deserved a Christian burial," died April 5 of heart disease near Dallas.Mr. Oswald, shot by Jack Ruby, was to be buried Nov. 25, 1963, in Rose Hill Cemetery. But the ministers who were supposed to perform the service did not show, so the funeral director asked Mr. Saunders to preside.Roger F. Murray II, 96, an expert on pensions who helped create the concept of individual retirement accounts, died Monday of a heart attack in Wolfeboro, N.H.James B. Conkling, 83, who helped develop the Grammys and later became the first president of Warner Bros.
NEWS
November 5, 1991
For many years Rabbi Alexander Schindler has been an eloquent and courageous voice in Reform Judaism in America, and he brought a timely message in his opening remarks to the 4,000 delegates who gathered this week in Baltimore for the biennial meeting of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. His message was that tolerant people of all religions and cultures in America must come together to resist the siren blandishments of extremists like Louis Farrakhan on the one side, David Duke on the other.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
Many of the 4,000 delegates from the United States and Canada here for Reform Judaism's biennial assembly seem to have their minds elsewhere -- in Madrid, Spain, the site of the current Middle East peace conference.The peace talks "will dominate conversations at the biennial," said delegate Karen Stromberg of Paradise Valley, Ariz., echoing the sentiments of other conventioneers as they registered yesterday at the Baltimore Convention Center downtown.Resolutions seeking to shape Reform policy on the Middle East will be taken up during plenary sessions of the 61st General Assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | October 31, 1991
Thousands of delegates representing Reform Judaism in North America begin meetings today in Baltimore excited by the Middle East peace conference but also skittish about how American Jews should respond to the talks in Madrid, Spain.The Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC), which expects nearly 4,000 delegates to attend its biennial convention, has long expressed disagreement with Israel's Likud government over such matters as Palestinian rights and settlements in occupied territories.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
Friars' seminar tomorrow to provide history of the Mass The Friars of the Sanctuary of St. Anthony will offer a seminar, "Do This in Remembrance of Me," from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow. The seminar will provide a history of the Mass and an explanation of the ritual used to participate in the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. Registration is required. The fee is $25. The friars will offer another seminar, "Your Sins Are Forgiven," from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 21. It will examine what constitutes a sin and its effect on relationships with self, others and God. Registration is required.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 30, 1991
Most American Jews have never been to Israel, do not consider themselves to be Zionists, and do not follow news from the Middle East very closely. The Middle East peace conference could change that.Several Jewish leaders say that depending on how the talks go, American Jewish opinion could break with Israel's hard-line government, or turn angrily on the Bush administration."I believe this peace conference will be a profound event in the life of American Jewry," said Albert Vorspan of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the umbrella group of Reform Judaism.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Religion Editor of The Sun | December 7, 1990
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, one of the nation's oldest and largest Reform Jewish synagogues, has announced to its members that it will open an elementary day school next fall.By 1995, the Pikesville congregation expects to enroll 150 students from kindergarten through the fifth grade.It will be only the 15th such school among more than 800 Reform congregations in the United States, said Rabbi Murray Saltzman of Baltimore Hebrew."While not everyone in the congregation is overjoyed," he said, "nevertheless, the decision stands as an important and historic move, which places this congregation in the forefront of Reform Judaism's dynamic growth."
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