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Reforestation

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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
On a 75-acre farm near Union Bridge, Clear Ridge Nursery is growing 60,000 plants, all "bay-friendly" and ready for use in conservation and forest restoration projects.The owners of the wholesale business have a lifelong respect for the state's forested lands, and for the benefits that residents and wildlife derive from native trees."Forests are a community of plants, woody trees and shrubs," said Joe Barley, who began the nursery last year with his wife, Sharon. "We are growing the more dominant components in the community."
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Tom Katzenberger calls the Essex Skypark "a blue-collar airport" - a place where the pilots have dirt under their fingernails. "All of us change our own oil," said Katzenberger, who owns a small concrete construction company and flies a 1996 Maule, a four-seat airplane. "All of us fix our own flats. " Katzenberger and other members of the Essex Skypark Association recently learned that the waterfront airport could be lost, and with it an aviation tradition that they say they couldn't afford to continue elsewhere.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | June 12, 1991
A 3-year-old program to replace trees lost to development along the county's waterfront has collected more than $560,000 from builders but hasn't planted a single tree.The County Council created the Critical Areas Reforestation Fund in 1988 when it passed regulations limiting development within 1,000 feet of Anne Arundel's 420-mile-long shore. Since then, officials have been unable to find landowners willing to allow trees to be planted on their property.But Councilwoman Diane Evans, R-Arnold, said she plans to introduce legislation next week that will allow the county to purchase woodlands or easements to protect mature forests from development.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Anne Arundel County plans to plant more than 12,000 trees at the headwaters of of Rockhold Creek and also purchase a 54-acre property on the Magothy River for conservation, County Executive John R. Leopold announced Monday. The projects are funded by the county's reforestation fund, which was created in 1985. According to county law, anyone who cuts down trees must mitigate that environmental damage, by either planting new trees or paying into the fund, which currently contains $4.1 million "This program reduces air and water pollution, provides habitat for wildlife and facilitates educational opportunities," Leopold said in a statement.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 21, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Developers concerned about the potential cost of an administration bill aimed at conserving Maryland's forests gave their conditional approval of the bill yesterday, but also presented dozens of amendments to make it easier for them to live with it."I'm not suggesting it's a bad bill, per se," Alton Scavo, a Rouse Co. spokesman, told the Senate's Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee. "I just think it needs a little melding."The Rouse Co. submitted 34 suggested amendments, ranging from expanding the definition of planned unit development to lowering the amount of money developers would be required to pay into a state conservation fund from 15 cents per square foot to 4 cents per square foot.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | March 26, 1991
A Severn River group wants developer fees, now targeted to replanting trees along Anne Arundel's 420 miles of shoreline, used to protect mature forests.More than $560,000 has accumulated in the CriticalArea Reforestation Fund since the county adopted regulations in 1988limiting development within a 1,000-foot-wide buffer along the shore.But, so far, no trees have been planted.Meanwhile, mature forests continue to be cleared, said Stuart Morris, president of the Severn River Association, which represents about 90 neighborhood groups.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 6, 1993
Local farmers expressed concern about the stat reforestation bill and the possible merging of the state Department of Agriculture with the Department of Natural Resources at last night's Carroll County Farm Bureau legislative dinner.The annual dinner at the Carroll County Agricultural Center in Westminster was attended by most of the county delegation to the General Assembly and Carroll government officials interested in agriculture."I'd hate to see the Department of Agriculture swallowed up by DNR," said Gary Brauning, president of the Carroll County Farm Bureau.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
The County Commissioners and members of Carroll's State House delegation wasted no time yesterday disagreeing about how to run local government.The first of several disputes centered on the county's forest conservation law -- said to be the toughest in the state. Delegation members think it is too strict.Republican Del. Donald B. Elliott said Carroll's reforestation requirement that developers replace every tree they remove discourages companies from coming to the county."I want to take forestation off the table" when talking to prospects, by creating an exemption in the law for businesses, Elliott said.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Not a single tree grows on the 69,000-square-foot parcel at Eastern Avenue and North Point Boulevard. There hasn't been a tree there for more than 30 years. It's part of an asphalt parking lot that serves Eastpoint Mall.James T. Dresher Jr. wants to build a family-style steakhouse on FTC that piece of asphalt. He will spend $20,000 to meet Baltimore County's strict landscaping standards. This includes planting 41 trees, 332 shrubs and 415 perennials. No problem there.But there is also the matter of the county's forest conservation law. It was designed to require developers to replace trees they destroy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
HARRISBURG, Pa.-- Saying forests are essential to saving the Chesapeake Bay, the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia agreed yesterday to replant trees along more than 2,000 miles of streams in their states over the next 14 years.Gov. Parris N. Glendening went beyond the joint pledge, setting a goal for Maryland of reforesting 600 stream miles, about 60 percent more than the state's share under the agreement."We have to challenge ourselves and others to do more," Glendening said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
A state legislator has been directed by environmental regulators to restore trees removed from his waterfront property and clean construction debris from the banks of a stream on the parcel, according to a letter from Baltimore County officials. Del. Richard K. Impallaria must plant a forest buffer on the 2-acre property, where, according to the letter, trees were cleared without government approval. Impallaria also did grading work on the property without receiving county approval, according to the letter, written this month by the director of Baltimore County's Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
Kristin VanZandt has found a way to bring home all the color she experiences in Guatemala. The 33-year-old registered nurse imports Guatemalan handicrafts, using the proceeds to fund trips there to assist aid workers in clinics in the impoverished nation. Since her first trip in 2001, she has stuffed her suitcases with prenatal and children's vitamins, clothing and other supplies to give away. And since starting her company, Vida Dulce Imports, a year ago, VanZandt regularly brings back luggage loaded with beaded purses, jewelry and pillows that she sells in shops in Glenelg and on Ellicott City's Main Street, as well as at fairs and festivals.
NEWS
By Gady Epstein and Gady Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 12, 2003
YONGQUAN VILLAGE, China - In a place where peasants grow just enough food to get by, the mulberry saplings beginning to take root in the mountain slopes of this farming village have become an issue of life and death. The saplings were planted to firm the ground and, ultimately, help curb the landslides and floods that have visited misery on farmers for centuries, from here to the Yangtze River. But the trees have disturbed the order of life so delicately balanced on this shifting soil.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
On a patch of open land along a stream in West Friendship - down a long dirt path and across a field from the nearest road - the quiet was broken repeatedly last week by hundreds of fifth-graders from schools around Howard County. They descended on the field equipped with boots, water, worksheets and pencils, and planted a scattering of stick-like seedlings that should grow into a protective stream buffer. Fifth-graders wielding shovels will continue to be a common sight in the area throughout next month as the Schools and Streams project enters its fifth year in Howard County.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
On a patch of open land along a stream in West Friendship - down a long, dirt path and across a field from the nearest road - the quiet was broken repeatedly last week by hundreds of fifth-graders from schools around Howard County. They descended on the field equipped with boots, water, worksheets and pencils, and planted a scattering of stick-like seedlings that should grow into a protective stream buffer. Fifth-graders wielding shovels will continue to be a common sight in the area throughout next month as the Schools and Streams project enters its fifth year in Howard County.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
The Friends of Carroll County Streams expects to receive a donation of 1,000 trees and shrubs for its first restoration project, tree planting along a tributary of the south branch of the Patapsco River on April 7. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation has pledged 800 trees and shrubs - worth $6,000 - for the stream-bank reforestation project on a 300-acre state-owned tract off Hoods Mill Road near Sykesville. The Department of Natural Resources will contribute 200 trees, the group said. The group will meet at 7 p.m. today at Bear Branch Nature Center.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | April 15, 1992
With a state-imposed deadline two weeks away, the Carroll commissioners yesterday said they are "very close" to approving a county forestconservation ordinance.The commissioners left a two-hour meetingyesterday with the Environmental Affairs Advisory Board with two issues still unresolved:* How much the county should charge developers who, for whatever reasons, are not able to preserve or replant forested land.* Whatshould the qualifications be for the person who prepares forest conservation plans.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 27, 1992
WINFIELD -- Engineers, landscapers and foresters came to a public workshop on Carroll's proposed forest conservation ordinance not to debate the philosophy behind the law but the mechanics in complying with it."I'm 100 percent in favor of the ordinance," said Len Wrabel, a Westminster forester who was among about a dozen people who attended the meeting Wednesday at South Carroll High School. "I like it."Mr. Wrabel and others raised concerns about technicalities, including the size and species of trees required for reforestation and how existing forests on flood plains would fit into any reforestation efforts.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
The County Commissioners and members of Carroll's State House delegation wasted no time yesterday disagreeing about how to run local government.The first of several disputes centered on the county's forest conservation law -- said to be the toughest in the state. Delegation members think it is too strict.Republican Del. Donald B. Elliott said Carroll's reforestation requirement that developers replace every tree they remove discourages companies from coming to the county."I want to take forestation off the table" when talking to prospects, by creating an exemption in the law for businesses, Elliott said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
HARRISBURG, Pa.-- Saying forests are essential to saving the Chesapeake Bay, the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia agreed yesterday to replant trees along more than 2,000 miles of streams in their states over the next 14 years.Gov. Parris N. Glendening went beyond the joint pledge, setting a goal for Maryland of reforesting 600 stream miles, about 60 percent more than the state's share under the agreement."We have to challenge ourselves and others to do more," Glendening said.
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