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By CAL RIPKEN JR | November 19, 2006
DEAR CAL -- My grandson is 11 years old and seems to be a very good athlete. He plays basketball, football and baseball, although I think baseball is his favorite. Are there any exercises to improve his reflexes? Carolyn Dotterer, Towson DEAR CAROLYN -- While I'm sure that there are plenty of scientifically proven methods of improving a young person's reflexes, I don't think that anything takes the place of having a child actually participating in the sports that he or she enjoys. If your grandson has a sport that he likes playing during each season of the year, his motor skills, coordination, athleticism and reflexes are going to develop naturally over time.
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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 18, 2014
"I think they're going too far with Ray Rice. " So said a civil servant I know only in passing, making small talk the other day. No, it is not the majority opinion, but neither is the guy alone. Last week, USA Today quoted women fans who pointedly support Rice, the NFL star dropped by the Baltimore Ravens and indefinitely suspended by the league this month for a February incident in which he cold-cocked his then-fiancee (now wife) Janay Palmer. "I've met the guy," said one. "He's such a sweet guy. " "I'm supporting him all the way around," said another woman, herself a survivor of domestic abuse.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Last year, Jerre Musser, a retired math teacher fro Taneytown, took a senior citizens driving course called 55 Alive.Mrs. Musser said taking the class improved her driving.Now, she said, "I am able to predict what's coming up and act, rather than react."So now Mrs. Musser, 66, teaches the course, which is sponsored several times a year by the American Association of Retired Persons.About 20 seniors attended the two-day course taught by Mrs. Musser Thursday and Friday at the public library in Westminster.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | July 8, 2013
Mohamed Morsi holds a singular distinction. While president of Egypt, he was the world's only democratically elected leader to motivate more than 20 million of his people, one-quarter of the population, to sign a petition calling for his ouster. Millions of these people began showing up at angry, sometimes violent demonstrations in Cairo and other cities a week ago, the one-year anniversary of his rule. They're irate about Mr. Morsi's blatant leadership failures. Egypt is riven with enervating economic, political and social problems of the sort it has never experienced before.
NEWS
By Laura Beil and Laura Beil,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 2004
In the future, reality shows may have names such as "Extreme Makeover: Brain Edition" or "Sharp Eye for the Dumb Guy." At the beginning of each episode, viewers could learn about one hapless soul's lifelong struggles with algebra and another's desire to not be a worrywart. By the end of the hour, the transformed contestants would be winning chess matches and prancing carefree through fields of daisies. Don't check the TV listings just yet, but the idea is not all fantasy. Some neurologists have recently wondered whether their field is the next frontier in elective medicine.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The eyes of the world may have been on the Summer Olympics in Barcelona yesterday, but the 26 competitors at Gunpowder Falls State Park were thinking snow.They were the finest State Highway Administration snow-removal specialists who assembled to compete for top honors in the 4th annual Snow Roadeo competition.Even the more experienced drivers going through the course, which was laid out with orange traffic cones on a parking lot, admitted it was challenging."The course was tight, tighter than usual," said George Weidner of the Hagerstown shop, an 18-year snow-removal veteran.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Dr. Harry A. Teitelbaum, a retired psychiatrist and neurologist whose practice spanned half a century, died of arteriosclerosis June 30 at his North Baltimore home. He was 98. Dr. Teitelbaum was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., one of seven children of Russian immigrants. He earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1929, and was a 1935 graduate of the UM School of Medicine. He earned a doctorate in anatomy a year later. He completed a residency in psychiatry and neurology at Bellevue Hospital in New York City.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | April 19, 1991
DON'T GO OUT and eat a hot fudge sundae worrying over the fate of 42-year-old overweight heavyweight George Foreman tonight's title fight against Evander Holyfield.As amazing as it seems, two of three sports medicine physicians interviewed say Foreman's age, weight and reflexes do not put him at any greater risk than the 28-year-old Holyfield.In fact, if a man is going to resume boxing at an advanced age, then Foreman has done it exactly right, said Dr. Robert Cantu, a neurosurgeon, boxing expert and sports medicine specialist in Concord, Mass.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
Wilde Lake goalkeeper Nick Parypinski has what no coach can teach -- great reflexes. That's what makes the 5-foot-11 junior so tough against breakaways and one-on-ones.He regards stopping a breakaway by Glenelg's Reg Brown last season in the regional finals as one of the highlights of his high school career. The Wildecats eventually won that game in overtime, 2-1, and then advanced as far as the state finals before losing to Patapsco.Parypinski also stopped a breakaway against Oakland Mills in the regional semifinals.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 14, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- To the grumps and zealots who insist that Michael Jordan is embarrassing himself and baseball this spring: Take a pill and try to relax, OK? And by the way, you're wrong.You want to talk about who is embarrassing baseball? Let's talk about who is really embarrassing baseball. With their soul-robbing wild-card playoffs, unsubstantiated cries of poverty and empty-suit commissionership, the owners are doing far more defile the game than Jordan ever could with a mere hitless spring.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | dan.connolly@baltsun.com | February 7, 2010
As Miguel Tejada attempts to make the switch to third base in 2010 after playing shortstop his entire major league career, he can look to Orioles history for guidance. Thirteen years ago, another proud and aging superstar made the short but potentially treacherous trip from shortstop to third base at Camden Yards, and did so without difficulty. It just took time, patience and repetition, said Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. "I think the hardest part is reworking the thinking about the position," said Ripken, who was the Orioles' everyday shortstop from 1983 to 1996, before moving at age 36 to make room for shortstop Mike Bordick.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | October 11, 2007
When Apple releases Leopard this month (we hope), owners of older PowerPC-based Macs will have a tougher-than-usual decision to make. Unlike new versions of Microsoft's Windows operating system, which invariably require much more robust hardware to run acceptably than the previous version, every successive version of Mac OS X has actually run faster on existing hardware. Because of this, I have always advised Mac users to run the latest supported version of OS X on their Mac. But Leopard promises to be a cat of a different stripe.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | November 19, 2006
DEAR CAL -- My grandson is 11 years old and seems to be a very good athlete. He plays basketball, football and baseball, although I think baseball is his favorite. Are there any exercises to improve his reflexes? Carolyn Dotterer, Towson DEAR CAROLYN -- While I'm sure that there are plenty of scientifically proven methods of improving a young person's reflexes, I don't think that anything takes the place of having a child actually participating in the sports that he or she enjoys. If your grandson has a sport that he likes playing during each season of the year, his motor skills, coordination, athleticism and reflexes are going to develop naturally over time.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Dr. Harry A. Teitelbaum, a retired psychiatrist and neurologist whose practice spanned half a century, died of arteriosclerosis June 30 at his North Baltimore home. He was 98. Dr. Teitelbaum was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., one of seven children of Russian immigrants. He earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1929, and was a 1935 graduate of the UM School of Medicine. He earned a doctorate in anatomy a year later. He completed a residency in psychiatry and neurology at Bellevue Hospital in New York City.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 23, 2005
Terri Schiavo's eyes look vacant. Her mouth hangs open. Then, her mother approaches, saying, "Hi, baby," in a bright voice. Schiavo's lips turn upward, and her blinking accelerates. What do these carefully edited video clips reveal about the severely brain-damaged woman? Nothing of any real significance, medical experts say. Therein lies one of the most difficult-to-grasp facets of this controversial right-to-die case. What appears on the surface to be intelligent, intelligible behavior on Schiavo's part is anything but, most physicians say. To the contrary, the 41-year-old woman is capable only of meaningless, spontaneous responses arising from the deepest, most primitive centers of her brain, experts suggest.
NEWS
By Laura Beil and Laura Beil,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 2004
In the future, reality shows may have names such as "Extreme Makeover: Brain Edition" or "Sharp Eye for the Dumb Guy." At the beginning of each episode, viewers could learn about one hapless soul's lifelong struggles with algebra and another's desire to not be a worrywart. By the end of the hour, the transformed contestants would be winning chess matches and prancing carefree through fields of daisies. Don't check the TV listings just yet, but the idea is not all fantasy. Some neurologists have recently wondered whether their field is the next frontier in elective medicine.
NEWS
By Clancy Sigal | July 27, 1992
GEORGE Orwell was convinced that corrupt language -- inflated imagery, stale metaphors, meaningless words -- corrupted thought.As I watched the Democratic convention, his ghost reminded me that "euphemism, question-begging and a sheer cloudy vagueness" in political language was not unique to Britain in the 1930s.Am I the only left-leaning progressive who feels asphyxiated every time Bill Clinton makes a speech?Forget Al Gore, who has so mastered Non-Speak that a pharmaceutical company should buy the rights to him as a non-addictive alternative to Seconal.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - I'll be honest. I have trouble seeing Robert Kelly as a victim. The singer, professionally known as R. Kelly, stands accused by Chicago authorities of child pornography, the chief evidence of which is a videotape that allegedly shows him having sex with an underage girl. Similar charges in Florida were tossed last month on a technicality. So, while Mr. Kelly is certainly entitled to the legal presumption of innocence, he hardly seems like a fellow who should be greeted with trophies and applause.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - I'll be honest. I have trouble seeing Robert Kelly as a victim. The singer, professionally known as R. Kelly, stands accused by Chicago authorities of child pornography, the chief evidence of which is a videotape that allegedly shows him having sex with an underage girl. Similar charges in Florida were tossed last month on a technicality. So, while Mr. Kelly is certainly entitled to the legal presumption of innocence, he hardly seems like a fellow who should be greeted with trophies and applause.
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