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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | February 25, 2011
Aunt Tilly finally decided to give you that old dining room set you always loved, but countless family get-togethers have taken their toll. Or maybe you spotted a great antique credenza at a secondhand store, and its worn-out, scratched finish has you thinking twice. There are many reasons for refinishing older and antique furnishings. Whatever they are, there's no doubt refinishing or restoration can be an environmentally friendly and economical way to give older tables, chairs, chests and sideboards a new lease on life.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | February 25, 2011
Aunt Tilly finally decided to give you that old dining room set you always loved, but countless family get-togethers have taken their toll. Or maybe you spotted a great antique credenza at a secondhand store, and its worn-out, scratched finish has you thinking twice. There are many reasons for refinishing older and antique furnishings. Whatever they are, there's no doubt refinishing or restoration can be an environmentally friendly and economical way to give older tables, chairs, chests and sideboards a new lease on life.
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FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | May 30, 1993
If you've never done it, refinishing a wood chair or table sounds easy enough. Just strip off the old finish to reveal the wood's underlying glory, do a little sanding, apply some stain if the wood needs it, then put on the new finish. Voila.Question: Is refinishing a piece of furniture really that simple?Answer: Of course not.A good refinishing project is a long, painstaking process that requires patience, dedication and an eye for detail. Yet in spite of the time and effort it takes to strip, stain and refinish wood, retailers report a dramatic increase in sales of furniture refinishing products such as paint and finish removers, cleaners, wood stains and finishes.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
When Jeanne and Sean St. Martin bought an old house on a hill above Historic Ellicott City's Main Street, they became the owners of a building that had been turned into three apartments and had been rented for decades. They could see the sky through numerous places in the roof. That was 22 years and many improvements ago. The couple, both accountants, removed walls, created rooms, dumped three work kitchens in favor of one airy eat-in and stripped the black paint off the pine floors in a home that already had a few additions to the original house.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz | May 30, 1993
While refinishing a small piece of wooden furniture is a labor-intensive and messy job, unusual skills and tools aren't required. Nor is there a need to worry about dangerous fumes and caustic chemicals: Refinishing products are safe when used as directed.Before you begin a project, however, here's some advice that can save you time and trouble.* Visit a library or bookstore and pick up a book on refinishing before beginning your first project. Home centers and hardware stores are another excellent source of information.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
A 40- by 70-foot wooden building used for refinishing furniture burned to the ground yesterday in a fire equal to three alarms.The building in the 5400 block of Buffalo Road, Mount Airy, carried the name Jack's Refinishing. There were four men inside when the fire erupted around a machine used in the refinishing procedure, according to Deputy State Fire Marshal Frank M. Rauschenberg.Jack Douglas operated the business in a building owned by his mother, Cathy Douglas, according to the deputy fire marshal.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | August 16, 1998
SOMETIMES the hardest part of getting started on a new home improvement project is gathering enough information on how to go about it.Most manufacturers of home improvement products are happy to help out with brochures you can send for. (Most also have Web sites, but that doesn't help if you don't have access to a computer.)Here are some free brochures we've heard about recently:* From Benjamin Moore, the paint people: booklets on "How to Paint the Interior of Your Home" and "How to Paint the Outside of Your Home."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Heagy's Sports Shop, the landmark Main Street sporting goods store destroyed in 1991 during Westminster's worst fire, will not reopen, its owner and attorney said yesterday."
FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Contributing Writer | December 13, 1992
Whether you're contemplating putting in a new wood floor or refinishing an old one, don't automatically resort to a run-of-the-sawmill approach. These days, there's an almost infinite number of alternatives to the conventionally installed wood strip floor and conventional one-wood-tone finish.One of the hottest new options, and one you'll be hearing more about in the next few years, is the use of recycled wood floors or recycled wood milled into flooring. In big cities such as Chicago, New York and Houston, some specialty wood flooring companies are salvaging floor wood from old mansions, department stores, public buildings and even warehouses.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
Barbara Demidenko, who escaped the Communist takeover of Ukraine and later settled in Baltimore, died yesterday at her Lansdowne home of complications from a fall. She was 92. Born and raised Barbara Ackerman in Ukraine, she left school at an early age to help her parents, who were farmers. In 1941, she married John Demidenko. After Communists took control of Ukraine, the young couple fled their homeland in a horse-drawn wagon with their two sons hidden beneath a load of straw. They made their way to Hamburg, Germany, where they lived in a refugee camp until landing at Ellis Island in New York City in 1950.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | September 24, 2006
It's easy to be cynical about artist Sandra Magsamen. When her signature ceramic plaques first started appearing in stores 17 years ago, with sweet little messages like "Believe in yourself" and "Let your dreams take flight," they seemed fresh and charming. But nowadays she's a lifestyle industry, with a new book out, Living Artfully, a new line of baby clothes and scores of home decor items, greeting cards, cookware and calendars. Her elongated hearts and upbeat sayings have become this decade's version of the smiley face.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
Barbara Demidenko, who escaped the Communist takeover of Ukraine and later settled in Baltimore, died yesterday at her Lansdowne home of complications from a fall. She was 92. Born and raised Barbara Ackerman in Ukraine, she left school at an early age to help her parents, who were farmers. In 1941, she married John Demidenko. After Communists took control of Ukraine, the young couple fled their homeland in a horse-drawn wagon with their two sons hidden beneath a load of straw. They made their way to Hamburg, Germany, where they lived in a refugee camp until landing at Ellis Island in New York City in 1950.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Barry R. Malpass, a furniture refinisher and war veteran who touched the lives of countless children as a Boy Scout leader for more than 40 years, died of liver cancer Saturday at his Frederick Road home near Catonsville. He was 76. He was born in the city's Reservoir Hill neighborhood. After completing sixth grade, he and his identical twin brother, Billy, attended vocational school until they were 16 - when both enlisted in the merchant marine and traveled around the world. Returning to Baltimore, he married his childhood sweetheart, JoAnn, on Father's Day in 1950, and began working as a furniture refinisher in his father's business, M.D. Malpass & Sons on Reisterstown Road.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1999
Richard Victor Miceli, who refinished the doors on the Washington Monument and other Baltimore landmarks, died while swimming Tuesday in the pool of his Mocksville, N.C., home. The former Catonsville resident was 57.A heart attack is suspected as the cause of death.Mr. Miceli operated Baltimore Stripping Corp. from 1985 to 1990, offering advice to hundreds of customers restoring rowhouses and other buildings during the rehab boom of William Donald Schaefer's mayoral administration."From early on, Rick liked to work with his hands and with wood," said his brother, Francis G. Miceli Jr. of Homeland.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | September 27, 1998
Furnishing AmericaWhere do you shop for furniture? If you're like most consumers, you buy bedding and other household items in stores devoted exclusively to furniture and decorations. The second most common place to shop for furniture is in department stores, with office-supply stores a close third. Those are some of the conclusions in a report by Furniture/Today, a weekly trade publication, on the industry that took in revenues of $13.6 billion in 1997, the latest year for which figures are available (up from $12.1 billion in 1996)
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | August 16, 1998
SOMETIMES the hardest part of getting started on a new home improvement project is gathering enough information on how to go about it.Most manufacturers of home improvement products are happy to help out with brochures you can send for. (Most also have Web sites, but that doesn't help if you don't have access to a computer.)Here are some free brochures we've heard about recently:* From Benjamin Moore, the paint people: booklets on "How to Paint the Interior of Your Home" and "How to Paint the Outside of Your Home."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | September 27, 1998
Furnishing AmericaWhere do you shop for furniture? If you're like most consumers, you buy bedding and other household items in stores devoted exclusively to furniture and decorations. The second most common place to shop for furniture is in department stores, with office-supply stores a close third. Those are some of the conclusions in a report by Furniture/Today, a weekly trade publication, on the industry that took in revenues of $13.6 billion in 1997, the latest year for which figures are available (up from $12.1 billion in 1996)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
Jessica and Dave Burns fell in love with a quaint green and white bungalow in Overlea, so they bought it, then proceeded to tear it apart.Over the five years they have lived there, almost every room has been renovated: walls have been torn out, doors moved and carpets pulled up in favor of a decor popular when the early-20th-century house was built.And the couple did almost all of it themselves."Dave didn't believe in hiring someone to do anything you can do yourself," said Jessica Burns, 33, who works at Fort Meade as an analyst for the Defense Department.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
Jessica and Dave Burns fell in love with a quaint green and white bungalow in Overlea, so they bought it, then proceeded to tear it apart.Over the five years they have lived there, almost every room has been renovated: walls have been torn out, doors moved and carpets pulled up in favor of a decor popular when the early-20th-century house was built.And the couple did almost all of it themselves."Dave didn't believe in hiring someone to do anything you can do yourself," said Jessica Burns, 33, who works at Fort Meade as an analyst for the Defense Department.
NEWS
September 21, 1995
A plan to raise money for the arts in Anne Arundel County by selling bricks to resurface a fishing pier is on hold.Diane R. Evans, the Anne Arundel County Council chairwoman, said her proposal to spruce up the pier will have to wait until state officials finish work on the pier and decide what agency will own and manage the site.The State Highway Administration owns the pier, but the Department of Natural Resources typically runs fishing piers.A panel of representatives from both agencies has been working on a management agreement.
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