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BUSINESS
November 6, 2007
The Domino Sugar plant in South Baltimore that shut down after an explosion and fire last week could restart operations by Friday, a company official said yesterday. Brian O'Malley, president of sales and marketing for Domino Foods Inc.in Iselin, N.J., said work crews are doing an extensive overhaul and cleaning of the nine-story building on Key Highway. "We certainly feel very fortunate that nobody was seriously injured or killed," O'Malley said. "It's too early to tell on the damage estimate, but we're going to be back 100 percent in a very short period of time."
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NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
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BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
W. R. Grace & Co. announced yesterday that its third quarter profit rose 3 percent, buoyed by higher sales of chemicals used in oil refining. The Columbia chemical maker's results for the quarter exceeded by a cent the 50 cents a share average forecast by analysts. The results were announced after the market close. Grace earned $34.1 million, or 51 cents per diluted share, a 15.9 percent increase in earnings per share when compared with $32.8 million, or 44 cents a share, in the same quarter last year.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
"Bat Boy: The Musical" may not be what one expects - there's not a baseball in sight - but it's still a must-see show in all aspects, captivating Colonial Players audiences since it opened in March. Set to a melodic pop-rock score, this tabloid tale - direct from Weekly World News - is set in a small West Virginia town where a half-human, half-bat mutant is found in a cave by the spelunking Taylor siblings, Ron, Rick and Ruthie. The tale unfolds as Bat Boy learns to behave most civilly toward towns folk - who respond less civilly toward him. The Colonial Players production of "Bat Boy" compares well to another renowned version of the show: the 2001 off-Broadway run at Union Square Theater, which captured several off-Broadway musical awards.
NEWS
July 27, 2002
Samuel H. McGlumphy, a retired division manager for Quaker State Oil Refining Corp. and a World War II veteran, died of heart failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 82. A resident of Joppatown since 1966, Mr. McGlumphy was born and raised in Wellsburg, W.Va. He enlisted in the Army after graduating from high school. In the early years of World War II, he served as a member of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's White House honor guard and once had tea with first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, according to his son, Jan Jackson McGlumphy of Bel Air. Mr. McGlumphy later served with a unit of Army engineers in France that helped lay a pipeline across the country.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Crown Central Petroleum Corp., which has posted losses in seven of the past eight years, reported a second-quarter loss yesterday of $11 million, or $1.12 per share, vs. a $2.2 million loss, or 22 cents a share, in the comparable quarter last year.The Baltimore gasoline refiner and retailer had revenue of $281 million, compared with $339 million in the second quarter of 1998.Crown blamed the loss in large part on low refining margins -- the difference between what it costs to purchase and refine crude oil and the amount made on sales of the finished product.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
Crown Central Petroleum yesterday reported a 57 percent decrease in second-quarter earnings as a poor performance by the company's refining operations was too much for the retail division to overcome.The Baltimore-based oil refiner and marketer reported net profit of $3 million for the quarter ending June 30, down from $7 million earned during the corresponding quarter in 1995. On a per-share basis, earnings plummeted from 72 cents to 31 cents.For the first six months of the year, Crown had a net loss of $10 million, or $1.03 a share, a larger loss than the $3.1 million, or 32 cents a share, for the corresponding period in 1995.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF Sun Staff writer M. William Salganik contributed to this article | October 30, 1998
Crown Central Petroleum Corp., a Baltimore-based refiner and marketer of gasoline, reported yesterday a 72.5 percent drop in third-quarter profit on a 25 percent decline in revenue.Crown also said yesterday that Edward L. Rosenberg, executive vice president in charge of supply and transportation, will leave the company at the end of the year "to be actively involved in family business interests."Frank B. Rosenberg, senior vice president of marketing, will add the responsibility for wholesale sales and terminals.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 30, 2005
DALLAS -- Airlines already crumbling under crude oil prices face another major expense: the record-high cost of turning crude into jet fuel. Since hurricanes Katrina and Rita idled much of the Gulf of Mexico's refining capacity, most U.S. airlines have been paying an extra premium to refine or "crack" the oil into kerosene-like jet fuel. In July, before the storms, airlines paid the equivalent of $11 per barrel of crude in addition to the spot price to keep planes aloft. Now the "crack spread" has spiked to nearly $59, meaning it costs nearly as much to refine the jet fuel as it does to buy a barrel of crude.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
Baltimore-based Crown Central Petroleum Corp. posted its first profit in nearly two years during the second quarter, but sees a challenging environment ahead, the company said yesterday. Crown said it earned $9.2 million, or 93 cents a share, in the quarter, which ended June 30. That compares with a net loss of $11 million, or $1.12 per share, posted for the second quarter of 1999. Sales totaled $481 million, a 71 percent jump from the $281.4 million notched during second-quarter 1999.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Columbia chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. said Thursday that it took a hit to sales in the second quarter as a price increase prompted customers to jump ship. Investors didn't like that news, pressing the stock price down $5.33 a share — more than 6 percent — to $78.45 at market's close. Grace's revenue fell about 3 percent in the three months ending June 30, to $802.8 million, compared with the year-earlier period. Profit rose — nearly 20 percent — but that was driven in part by an approximately $20 million drop in asbestos-related costs.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Brandon Hamschin grew up next door to a dairy farm in rural western Pennsylvania. So when this 31-year old engineer headed south to work in an applied physics lab in Laurel, Md., he knew a complete change was due and willingly opted for city-life. "I was fairly homeless before I moved here," he recalled. The applied physics lab put me up. " His search for houses online paid off when he found a small, two-story row house with basement and rooftop deck on a quiet street in the east Baltimore neighborhood of Canton.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Kit Waskom Pollard | November 4, 2012
For his 50th birthday, Patrick Sutton got down - but not dirty - on the farm. The Baltimore interior designer is known for his elegant, understated and carefully curated spaces. To celebrate his milestone birthday, he and his girlfriend, Tracy Kwiatkowski, kept the elegance but added a few rough edges. That approach - mixing high-end style with less refined elements - is a popular one among Baltimore's party planning elite. Sutton's "Rustic Renaissance" birthday festivities took place outside, overlooking the rolling hills of Sagamore Farm, the Reisterstown horse farm owned by Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank (and decorated by Sutton)
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Orioles reliever Pedro Strop turned 27 earlier this month, but he's already overcome a career's worth of obstacles. There were plenty of nights filled with uncertainty - and tears - along the way. There were times when he wondered whether his childhood dream would ever become reality, whether those times rehabbing and reinventing would ever pay off. "A lot of tough times," Strop said, sitting at his locker in the corner of the Orioles' clubhouse...
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Prometric, a Baltimore-based provider of educational testing services, said Thursday it secured a $175 million loan to refinance the remaining debt of when it was purchased five years ago by Educational Testing Services Inc. for $435 million. The loan arrangement is in two parts: a five-year, $165 million loan arranged by TD Securities, and a $10 million revolving line of credit funded by nine banks. Prometric will also use some of the funds as working capital for company initiatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
In the more than 45 years since the Prime Rib opened, precious little has changed at the iconic midtown restaurant. Walking in is like stepping into a bygone era: Well-dressed diners carve into steaks the size of dinner plates while waiters in suits top off their wine glasses. The walls are black with gold trim; on them hang paintings, posters and framed covers of Vogue from the early 1930s. And who could miss that swinging '60s leopard print carpet? The Prime Rib has been around long enough to see its style fall in and out of fashion.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 8, 2001
SAN ANTONIO - Valero Energy Corp. agreed yesterday to buy Ultramar Diamond Shamrock Corp. for $6 billion in cash, stock and assumed debt, creating the second-largest U.S. oil refiner behind Exxon Mobil Corp. Ultramar holders will get $55 in cash or 1.23 shares of Valero stock for each share held. That's 29 percent more than Ultramar's closing price Friday. Valero will pay about half in cash and half in stock. It will assume about $2 billion in debt. Valero's chief executive, William Greehey, said limited U.S. capacity for refining oil into gasoline and other fuels, combined with high demand, are boosting profit margins after years of low earnings.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Crown Central Petroleum Corp. said yesterday that low refining margins produced a $700,000 quarterly loss that snapped a year-long streak of strong earnings.The fourth-quarter loss represents a steep drop from the year-ago period, for which Baltimore-based Crown reported a net profit of $10.9 million. On a per-share basis, the loss was 7 cents, compared with net profit of $1.12 a share a year ago. Sales were down 7 percent, to $404 million.The company said high processing rates in the second and third quarters sent gasoline inventories soaring in the fourth quarter.
NEWS
Advertioral content by Ryan Homes | February 17, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT Leading locations and leading values…they've made Ryan Homes Maryland's #1 Homebuilder, and they've made Ryan Homes' new Kelly Glen community a leading destination for discerning homebuyers in Harford County. This community of new single-family homes in Bel Air represents the best value among all new single-family homes in the area, but still gives buyers the convenient location, size, features and energy efficiency they would expect in homes costing thousands more.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 26, 2011
Defensive tackle Arthur Jones made his first career start Saturday, finishing with just one tackle in the Ravens' 20-14 victory over the Cleveland Browns. “It felt amazing to run out of that tunnel with my team,” Jones said. “It was a special moment, and it couldn't have been a better Christmas.” Starting in place of injured defensive end Cory Redding (right ankle), Jones had a few chances to make plays but was unable to follow through. Jones said refining his play will be priority No. 1 this week.
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