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NEWS
October 14, 2005
Raising oil capacity serves U.S. interests The Sun's editorial on Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest's vote on the refinery legislation the House of Representatives passed late last week leaves the wrong impression about the legislation ("Mr. Gilchrest's flip-flop," Oct. 11). The Sun asserts incorrectly that it exploits the hurricane damage to aid refineries, that the bill involves environmental rollbacks and that "it would be hard to support the proposal on its merits." In fact, the hurricanes that devastated the Gulf Coast region clearly indicate the need for more refining infrastructure, a problem with which we have long been concerned.
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NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The House approved legislation yesterday that seeks to spur construction of oil refineries - the first major congressional response to rising energy prices and tight supplies after Hurricane Katrina. The bill passed 212-210, but only after House Republican leaders extended the roll call from a scheduled five minutes to about 40 minutes to round up the votes. Partisan tension boiled over, as Democrats shouted, "Shame! Shame! Shame!" to protest the prolonged vote. The measure was approved after the bill's GOP sponsors dropped the most contentious provision - relaxing anti-pollution rules for refinery projects - after moderate Republicans threatened to vote against the bill and possibly kill it. Still, every Democrat who was present voted "no," contending that the legislation was designed more to shield the GOP-controlled Congress from political fallout from high gas prices than to bring down fuel costs.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush called yesterday for a serious expansion of the nation's refining capacity to make more gasoline and other fuels. Energy companies support the goal, but warn it won't make a dent in high pump prices for several years. "It ought to be clear to everybody that this country needs to build more refining capacity to be able to deal with the issues of tight supply," Bush said during a White House news conference, echoing what officials of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have been saying for weeks.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Richard Simon and Warren Vieth and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | September 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush urged Americans yesterday to drive less and embrace conservation in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and he said he would work with Congress to enact new incentives for energy production and refinery construction. The president said he was directing federal agencies to take steps to reduce energy consumption and that he would release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as needed to ease the shortages and price spikes caused by the two hurricanes.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2005
Hurricane Rita's late shift to the east spared all but a few Texas oil refineries from significant damage, likely sparing consumers a repeat of the gasoline price shocks that occurred after Hurricane Katrina pummeled plants in Louisiana a month ago, energy experts said yesterday. At least eight refineries in the Houston area that had shut down before the storm as a precaution were working on getting restarted, and two pipelines that serve the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas were delivering gas in the wake of the storm, industry sources said.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | September 23, 2005
Oil industry experts say energy prices are likely to bounce back upward this weekend as Hurricane Rita charts an uncertain path toward the Houston area, which is home to more than a quarter of the nation's already beleaguered refining industry. For the second time in a month, gasoline futures climbed and natural gas prices hit new highs as oil companies abandoned hundreds of rigs in the Gulf of Mexico and shut down refineries that feed a pipeline that carries a majority of the Baltimore area's fuel.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | September 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. energy industry, already staggered by Hurricane Katrina, braced for another punch this weekend as Hurricane Rita headed for oil- and gas-producing areas along the Texas and Louisiana coast. A second hit could raise the chances for a recession, some analysts fear. The Gulf of Mexico is home to about a quarter of the country's oil and natural gas production, with Houston -- close to where the rapidly strengthening storm is projected to come ashore Friday or Saturday -- serving as the key refining center.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
The telephones don't work in Louisiana's St. Bernard Parish. In any case, there's no one to answer them. Nobody - not even business executives desperate to learn the fate of their employees - is allowed into the washed-out community. Domino Sugar is frantically battling against this information blackout to find the 332 people who until last week worked at its refinery there in Chalmette, southeast of New Orleans. Domino's owners, who also operate the landmark Baltimore factory, have paid for airtime on cable news channels to broadcast a toll-free number for people to call.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2005
The record high gasoline prices reached just a week ago in Maryland and much of the nation might seem like a bargain compared with what many experts say could occur at the pump once the effects of Hurricane Katrina are felt in the coming days. The powerful storm forced the evacuation of oil rigs and the shuttering of refineries along the Gulf of Mexico, sending natural gas, oil and gasoline prices higher yesterday amid fears that production in one of the nation's most important oil regions could be curtailed for days or weeks.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 25, 2005
A federal appeals court has largely upheld a Bush administration rule that allows thousands of power plants and refineries to avoid installing newer pollution control equipment when they modernize, rejecting arguments by Maryland and 13 other states that it violated the Clean Air Act. But the ruling yesterday was mixed and not final; another lawsuit by the states over air pollution rules was pending. Environmentalists said they had won some elements of the complex dispute over "new source review" regulations, which require older coal-fired plants to add modern filters when they upgrade.
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