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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
At a time when employers receive hundreds of applications for a single job opening, a glowing reference could be the difference between standing out and sitting at home. Enter CareerExcuse.com, a website that promises to "act as your past employer" and provide you with a positive reference. "You provide us with your name, employment dates, ending salary and job titles, we do the rest!!" the site pledges. Of course it's never OK to lie, and doing so can backfire. But some workers are desperate in what is the worst job market in more than a generation.
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NEWS
Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
One Towson University student drank so much alcohol he was unable to speak and threw up "without a pause" before passing out outside a nearby apartment complex, according to an anguished email his mother sent to university officials. Another student attempted to drink a bottle of Southern Comfort and ended up in the hospital with a blood alcohol content of 0.34 percent, a level that's life-threatening. In 2012, a rugby club member was so intoxicated he told a dormitory resident assistant that the year was 1993.
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BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | September 5, 1993
On the verge of hiring an agent to sell your house? Then real estate experts strongly recommend that you do what employers do: Check references."Selling your home is probably one of the largest financial transactions you'll ever make. So it's a very, very smart idea to ask an agent for references," says Judy Plowman, sales manager for the Bel Air office of Coldwell Banker Grempler Real Estate.To be sure, the task of calling a half-dozen previous customers to ask about an agent's performance can seem like a troublesome waste of time.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | May 19, 2014
Talk about generation gap. During a Saturday commemoration speech at Morgan State University's commencement, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lauded Morgan State's band and choir, which  moments earlier had rendered a crowd pleasing performance. Then the 63-year-old Holder turned to the band and asked, “Do you all know Flash Light?” referring to the 1978 hit song by funk troupe Parliament. The song peaked at Number One on the Billboard R&B charts and helped popularize the group's brand of music that became known as P-Funk.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Before tossing their caps into the air to celebrate graduation May 28, the Naval Academy's class of 2004 will belt out a decidedly different version of an old standard - "Navy Blue & Gold," a school anthem since 1923. The academy superintendent, Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, dropped this week two references to "men" from the song, saying the lyrics inadvertently excluded women. "It was time, to say the least," said the superintendent, standing on the steps of the academy chapel yesterday to watch plebes - or freshmen - scramble to climb Herndon Monument in an annual tradition.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 15, 2003
UNITED NATIONS - European and even Chinese diplomats took shots yesterday - some with humor - at Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's recent branding of France and Germany as "old Europe" for their reluctance to go to war against Iraq. French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin, one of the first speakers in the pivotal debate at the Security Council, noted tartly: "This message comes to you today from an old country, France, from a continent like mine, Europe, that has known war, occupation, barbarity."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | January 30, 2005
Serious fiction supposedly avoids gratuitous pop references certain to be incomprehensible to readers 50 years hence, whether to gangsta rap or Britney Spears. Topical touchstones may comfort the reader with the pleasures of the familiar, but they earn, it is assumed, no place in art. No writer depends upon the topical more than Tom Wolfe. Enlisting what has by now become his modus operandi, Wolfe peppers his current best seller, I Am Charlotte Simmons, with faddish buzz words like "globalization."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 17, 2000
An emperor's son disguised as "a second trombone." An executioner who wouldn't hurt a fly. A bribe-hungry bureaucrat who has managed to secure every official job worth having, including archbishop and first commissioner of police. Out of such stuff Gilbert and Sullivan concocted a time-resistant masterwork of tuneful comedy and satire. The enduring powers of "The Mikado" can be savored in the Young Victorian Theatre Company's production at the Bryn Mawr School, which celebrates the company's 30 years of devotion to the G & S canon.
SPORTS
November 21, 2007
Good morning -- Nick Saban -- We know football is king at Alabama, but the 9/11 and Pearl Harbor references seemed a bit much.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
Jeff Brauner, in Baltimore, asks if there's a difference between cumulo-stratus clouds and strato-cumulus: "Also, are there really nimbo-stratus clouds? Sounds like an oxymoron." Cloud names are bewildering, but I find only stratocumulus in my references -- broad, low clouds with brighter, puffy heaps. Nimbo means rain, so nimbostratus clouds are simply low, featureless clouds that rain.
NEWS
By June Sawyers,special to Tribune Newspapers | May 2, 2014
"Fluent in 3 Months: How Anyone at Any Age Can Learn to Speak Any Language From Anywhere in the World" HarperOne, $17.99 The subtitle might seem too good to be true but, according to author Benny Lewis, it can be done. Lewis is an Irishman and affable linguistic guide as well as the creator of fluentin3months.com, and he should know. At last count, he reports, he could "use" 12 languages "in varying degrees of proficiency. " In addition, he understands the basics of another 12 languages, and this from a guy who dropped out of his Spanish class as a dismal failure.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Elizabeth T. Clark, who was deputy head of Baltimore City's Department of Legislative Reference for more than two decades, died Jan. 18 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Agnes Hospital. The 50-year Catonsville resident was 89. The daughter of Galen Taylor, a West Point graduate and career Army officer, and Gertrude Taylor, a homemaker, Elizabeth Ann Taylor was born in Watertown, Mass. Because of her father's work, she spent her youth in Philadelphia and Washington, where she graduated in 1942 from Woodrow Wilson High School.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
It was the most expensive campaign ever launched, but opponents were determined to defeat the president's health care reform plan. "Would socialized medicine lead to socialization of other phases of American life?" began one of the pitches used in a massive advertising and lobbying effort. "Lenin thought so. He declared: 'Socialized medicine is the keystone to the arch of the Socialized State.'" That may sound like it was ripped from today's headlines — or at least, the debut this week of Fox News' latest talking head, Dr. Ben Carson.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
From many little yellow peeps, one artistic family saw a giant yellow bird. At the sixth annual "Peep Show" in downtown Westminster, the massive 3,810-marshmallow-strong Big Bird drew the biggest oohs and ahhs among the young kids and older fans who filled the Carroll County Arts Council building on Main Street Saturday, all there to take in a host of candy-inspired creations. The "Long Live Sesame Peep" display, complete with a trash-canned Oscar the Grouch, was created by Robert Mondor and his family - wife Ann, son Sean, 10, and daughter Lauren, 8, all of Westminster - and was just one of many pop-culture-inspired displays at the Easter event, which has become a major fundraiser for the council each year.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Should I consider changing the frames on my artwork/wall art to keep them looking up to date? It depends on how the frames were chosen initially. If the original design was a trend of the moment, and the look no longer fits the tastes or decor of the owner, definitely change the frame — and most likely the mat, too. If the proper conservation materials are used, the frame will likely never need to be replaced. We like to tell our customers that as much as we enjoy seeing the art and working on it, once the customer takes it home, we hope to never see it again.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
An elementary school student threatened a schoolmate with a bb gun during a morning school bus ride Wednesday in Northwest Baltimore, according to a city schools spokeswoman. Both students were boys, on a bus bound for Arlington Elementary School, said Edie House Foster, the spokeswoman. The threat was reported to school officials, and an investigation was launched by school police. House Foster said she did not know who reported the threat, nor did she know whether school police were able to find the weapon involved.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | February 17, 2002
A new translation of the country's best-selling modern Bible that incorporates gender-neutral references is roiling the evangelical world. Today's New International Version won't be out until April, but some evangelical Christians have pronounced it a desecration that, as far as they're concerned, is dead on arrival. "We believe that these changes are not only driven by a feminist agenda, but that they alter the essential meaning of passages that we believe to be inspired by God," said Randy Stinson, a Southern Baptist who is executive director of the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood in Louisville, Ky. The new edition was translated by a group of conservative biblical scholars and targeted to the evangelical market, which has made the original New International Version the most widely read English translation, with more than 150 million copies distributed globally.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | October 9, 2000
"If you're going to pick on a rookie, you might not want him called Dennis," said Dennis Miller during last week's "Monday Night Football" game. Dennis, you've been picked on for two reasons: 1) You have a great sports gig and we don't. 2) If we'd paid attention in school, we wouldn't have to look up these references of yours. "Dragged his feet like Neville Chamberlain": No, not the unknown, unsung Neville Brother. An advocate of appeasement as Britain's prime minister, Chamberlain was finally forced to declare war on Germany after it invaded Poland.
NEWS
November 22, 2012
The Sun recently ran a front page, above-the-fold story under the headline, "Ethics Board Gone AWOL?" (Nov. 12). The story went on to report in some detail about the workings of the seven-member Board of Legislative Reference, a body established by the city charter whose members include the mayor, the city solicitor, a member of the City Council, the president of the Johns Hopkins University, the deans of the University of Maryland and the University of...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is asking the council to appoint him to a long-dormant board city officials say is supposed to oversee the city's ethics director. "It is my hope that you will see fit to appoint me to represent this Honorable Body," Young wrote in a letter to fellow council members this week. The seven-member Board of Legislative Reference, which is charged with hiring and potentially dismissing the Director of Legislative Reference -- who also serves as the ethics director -- has not met in years, city officials say. One board member, contacted by The Sun, said he had never even heard of the board.
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