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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Terry Moore, who refereed and judged boxing matches for 36 years after a distinguished career as a middleweight fighter in the late 1940s and 1950s, was struck and killed by a car Saturday night in East Baltimore.The 65-year-old Mr. Moore -- his real name was Norman Theodore Barnes -- began boxing at age 15 after wandering into the Joe Gans Athletic Club gym.He said he could throw the punch that boxing coach George "Bright Eyes" Whyte was having trouble teaching to a student. "All right, kid, let's see what you can do," the instructor told young Norman, according to a later newspaper story.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Arnold A. "Arnie" Heft, a minor league Orioles pitcher during the 1930s who later was an NBA referee, co-owner of the Baltimore Bullets, noted horse owner and real estate entrepreneur, died in his sleep of unknown causes March 12 at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. The former Chevy Chase resident was 94. "Never in the 10 years that I worked for him did I ever feel like I was working for him," said Tim Keefe, Mr. Heft's horse trainer. "He never put pressure on me, even though he loved to win. " "Arnie was a very friendly guy who was drawn to people, and they were drawn to him. He stood 5-7 and had a 10-foot-tall heart," said Richard Hoffberger, who had been president for 27 years of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
James J. Wyman, who was an owner of a house inspection business, a sports referee and active in Republican politics, died of a heart attack Wednesday while refereeing a football game at John Carroll School in Bel Air. He was 50. The longtime Wiltondale resident was born in Washington and raised in Rockville and Monkton, where he graduated from Hereford High School in 1967. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1971 from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and in 1982 earned a second bachelor's degree in economics from what was then Towson State College.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | March 14, 2014
Et cetera Horse owner Arnold Heft dies; he pitched in minors, co-owned Bullets Arnold Heft , a longtime horse owner who pitched for the minor league Orioles in 1938, refereed in the NBA from 1945 to 1961 and co-owned the Baltimore Bullets from 1964 to 1968, died in his sleep Wednesday night at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. He was 94. Heft pitched four minor league seasons, finishing with a 30-25 record, including 22 victories for Owensboro in the D League in 1941.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
Basketball referee Wilbert T. Spivey collapsed and died yesterday at halftime of the Randallstown-Patterson boys game he was working at Coppin State College.Spivey, 43, had an apparent heart attack during the game, which was part of the third-annual Mayor's Basketball Academy tournament.Following courtside efforts by two athletic trainers and others to revive him, he was taken by ambulance to nearby Liberty Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.The game continued, and Randallstown, ranked No. 18 locally, won easily.
SPORTS
By Vic Ziegel and Vic Ziegel,New York Daily News | March 24, 1991
LAS VEGAS -- Richard Steele is a pit boss, supervising the gambling tables at the downtown Golden Nugget Hotel & Casino. The owner is Steve Wynn, who also owns the Mirage hotel on the Strip.The Mirage was the site of Monday night's heavyweight fight between Mike Tyson and Donovan "Razor" Ruddock. Steele, the pit boss, was the referee.What was the Nevada Boxing Commission thinking when it let Steele, even though he is a world-class referee, work this fight at his boss' hotel.Steele wouldn't have been inside the ring in New York, said Randy Gordon, chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 13, 1990
LAUREL -- Arnold Heft took advantage yesterday of his experience as a National Basketball Association referee in making a pitch that appeared to help win a purse for one of his racehorses.Heft, 71, hasn't refereed since 1961. But when he began to talk about the need for consistency in making decisions, it fit perfectly with the thinking of six members of the Maryland Racing Commission who voted to reverse a stewards' decision and elevated Heft's horse, Tacoboy, from fifth to fourth in a race here Oct. 6.It was a unanimous decision by the commissioners, who studied videotapes of the fourth race.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
Raymond Leroy Klingmeyer, a former boxer and referee who is a member of the state's boxing Hall of Fame, died Friday of renal failure at the Bel Air Health and Rehabilitation Center. He was 88. "When he came into the ring, he looked like a referee. He had a presence, like an old-time referee … that commanded the respect of the boxers," said Patrick Pannella, executive director of the Maryland State Athletic Commission. "He was knowledgeable about any possible event that could happen in the ring," Mr. Pannella said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1993
It's official. Rich Logue still enjoys wrestling.Logue became a wrestling referee about 10 years ago following a successful career as a wrestler for Westminster High School. The Finksburg resident developed into one of the top officials around, working the state tournament for the last three years.Logue, who wrestled at 132 and 138 pounds, spent four years on the Westminster varsity. He won the Carroll County championship twice, the Tri-State tournament twice and made the state tournament twice before he was graduated in 1980.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 10, 1991
The big blue Lincoln is rolling down the expressway, taking the referee back to his house in Timonium. It is dark outside. The referee's face is lit by the --board lights. It is time for dinner. The referee is hungry. The gym was hot and the game was not.This has been the routine for 20 years now. Leave work in the middle of the afternoon. Change into the black-and-white shirt, the black pants, the black shoes, the whistle. Get in the car, find the gym. Work the game, work up a sweat, get called a few names.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 19, 2014
No. 10 host Patterson and No. 7 Edmondson played Tuesday night for nearly three quarters in a boys basketball game that included 61 personal fouls. The Clippers (18-4) led 54-31 when the game was called complete by the referees. The Red Storm fell to 13-5. Patterson coach Harry Martin said the Red Storm coaches and players walked off the court with 44.3 seconds left in the third quarter. Edmondson coach Darnell Dantzler said he took a timeout and "I told my team to come here.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
As a kid, Terry McAulay watched football games on TV and practiced the moves he saw - not the spins and jukes of the players, but the gestures and actions of the officials. Hands on hips? Offside. Arms folded? Delay of game. At age 9, McAulay knew them all. "Terry would sit there for hours, mimicking every signal that the referees used," said Dene McAulay, his mother. "We marveled at [the pantomime]. He never said a word, he just did it. " Some day, he told his family, he would referee the Super Bowl . Sunday, McAulay will do that for the third time when the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks meet in Super Bowl XLVIII in East Rutherford, N.J. It's the highest honor for an NFL official and a tribute that doesn't surprise high school coaches in the Baltimore area who dealt with McAulay, of Howard County, in his early years as an arbiter.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
Raymond Leroy Klingmeyer, a former boxer and referee who is a member of the state's boxing Hall of Fame, died Friday of renal failure at the Bel Air Health and Rehabilitation Center. He was 88. "When he came into the ring, he looked like a referee. He had a presence, like an old-time referee … that commanded the respect of the boxers," said Patrick Pannella, executive director of the Maryland State Athletic Commission. "He was knowledgeable about any possible event that could happen in the ring," Mr. Pannella said.
SPORTS
By Adam Testa and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Two weeks ago, Jerry "The King" Lawler suffered a heart attack on live television. In the time since, websites have reported and speculated on Lawler's condition and the events surrounding the incident, which played out on live television. On tonight's episode of Raw, fans had the chance to hear from The King himself, who shared some shocking details about his condition immediately after awakening at the hospital. Lawler did not even remember being part of a tag team match on that episode, let alone the events that followed.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 24, 2012
New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick's decision to grab an official at the conclusion of the Ravens' 31-30 win Sunday night drew the headlines, but that doesn't mean that Ravens coach John Harbaugh has escaped the NFL's attention. The league announced Monday that it was opening an investigation into several coaches who had run-ins with officials Sunday, including Harbaugh's self-acknowledged bump of a referee while attempting to call a timeout in the fourth quarter. “We are reviewing incidents from yesterday's games involving the game officials and Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh, New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick and Washington Redskins offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan,” the NFL said.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 17, 2012
Nearly two weeks into the preseason, Ravens Pro Bowl outside linebacker Terrell Suggs said the replacement referees would have little impact on the outcome of games if the Ravens performed well. "We [the players] get paid to make plays and if we do our jobs, then we take the game out of the hands of the officials," Suggs said. "The outcome of a game should never come down to a referee's call. " Amen. The injured Suggs hasn't been able to play this year, but maybe he should talk to his teammates before they play the New England Patriots here Sunday night.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
Joseph DiRenzo Jr., the referee who signaled touchdown on Doug Flutie's unforgettable "Hail Mary" pass in 1984 and officiated many other big games in nearly 30 years as a National Collegiate Athletic Association referee, died of a heart attack Friday at his summer home in Sarasota, Fla. The Severna Park resident was 62.Mr. DiRenzo, who had been an executive in several oil and real estate companies, was regional sales manager for Dynasplint Inc. at his death.He was active in the Severna Park community and was chairman of the Anne Arundel County Physical Fitness Commission in the early 1980s.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
LAS VEGAS -- Referee Joe Cortez, a man known for allowing fighters to dictate a physical pace, has been named the third man in the ring for the Hasim Rahman-Lennox Lewis rematch Saturday night. Cortez is most recently remembered for allowing John Ruiz extra time to recover from a low blow against Evander Holyfield in their rematch. Cortez's action in that fight, won by Ruiz, may have cost him the nod as referee for the Bernard Hopkins-Felix Trinidad fight in September. Ruiz, like Trinidad, is Puerto Rican.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Ravens veteran safety Bernard Pollard has never been one to mince words, and he stayed true to form today when he was asked about whether he had any concern about the replacement officials who are on track to referee Week One.   "You know what, this is what it is right now,” said Pollard, letting out an audible groan as the question was asked. “I would love to see the refs come back. I could care less if you fine me or whatever. I would love to see them come back, but this is the business part of the NFL. They want things to happen, the refs want things to happen.
SPORTS
May 1, 2012
Enough is enough Teddy Greenstein Chicago Tribune I can live with the one-game clip. But if I were dean of discipline, Rajon Rondo also would have to agree to some conditions. Start with publicly apologizing to official Marc Davis. Acknowledge that you intentionally bumped him. He didn't get in your way, as you pathetically claimed. Go to some elementary schools and tell the kids that what you did was inexcusable. They look up to you; they're watching you. Why should they respect referees after seeing what you did?
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