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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 17, 2007
Live a Little, Kill a Little," "The Flame and the Pussycat," "Slay, Gypsy, Slay" and "The Fun-Fun-Killer." If you have a good memory for colorful television, you might recognize the above as episode titles to Anne Francis' fabulous, short-lived series, Honey West. Honey was a smoking-hot private eye with a lipstick walkie-talkie, earrings that doubled as smoke bombs and a way with judo. She was like Honor Blackman's Pussy Galore in Goldfinger -- but even sexier! (And like Ms. Blackman, Anne was at her peak -- in her ripe 30s -- when she played her most famous role.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
If it worked, Monsters vs. Aliens would be the movie equivalent of a novelty song like "The Purple People Eater" - a frolic that lodges in your brain and lightens your load for an entire season. But it's mostly just a giddy, gaudy shambles. This ragtag tale of a group of Earth monsters unleashed on the evil alien Gallaxhar (Rainn Wilson) will pop your eyes without tickling your funny bone. It might have sounded hilarious as a pitch. What could be more surefire for a 3-D animated romp than assembling slapstick versions of the 50-Foot Woman, the Fly (here, "Dr. Cockroach")
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 18, 2005
Studio publicity states that June Carter Cash was an early inspiration for Reese Witherspoon, who plays Johnny Cash's true love and salvation in Walk the Line. That's surprising, considering Witherspoon, 29, is known for artistic independence (she heads her own production company, Type A), while Carter gave public statements like, "I find my happiness from trying to make John comfortable and happy. And I try to take everything off him that would cause him worry. And he does me the same way."
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By Los Angeles Times | March 5, 2009
Series American Idol: : The judges' favorites return to compete for a spot in the top 12. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: : Nick (George Eads) struggles to put together a puzzle involving three killings that took place in a seedy motel over the course of a year. Taylor Swift guest stars as the teenage daughter of the motel's owners. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) 30 Rock: : Liz befriends a pregnant teen in hopes of adopting her baby. (9:31 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) ER: : A documentary film crew descends on the ER as Morris' cop girlfriend is rushed in with gunshot wounds and Sam tries to make amends with her mother.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 1, 2004
Costume dramas, let's face it, are often stuffy. Some, like Nicholas Nickleby (2002), are so overstuffed they can barely move. But even some of the better ones - 1995's Sense and Sensibility, say - are a bit too insistently high-toned. You feel you should put on a tie just to watch. Vanity Fair, the Reese Witherspoon costume drama, based on the William Makepeace Thackeray novel, doesn't have that problem. If anything, the film may be a tad trashy. Call it "Days of Our Victorian Lives."
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2002
NEW YORK - So you want Reese Witherspoon's perfect little life? The kudos for strong comedic performances in Election and Legally Blonde? The cute-on-cute looks? The storybook marriage to actor Ryan Phillippe? Having it all never seemed so meaningless when Witherspoon was out with her then-infant daughter, Eva, in the park. "I had to put her in the back of the car and change her and a paparazzi got her," Witherspoon recalled in an interview to promote her new movie, The Importance of Being Earnest.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2003
LONDON - Never underestimate the power of perkiness. Reese Witherspoon is about to take on Arnold Schwarzenegger in a duel of sequels. Witherspoon reprises the pink and peppy Elle Woods in Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde, which opens today. Schwarzenegger shakes the rust off for Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, opening today. "Arnold was so nice to me when I was a kid," Witherspoon says during an interview at the Dorchester Hotel. "He flew me out to Los Angeles to have all these meetings with great directors, so I can't begrudge him anything."
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | May 7, 1999
With wicked, blackhearted glee, "Election" rescues social satire from the icy remove of irony and slams it straight into the solar plexus, where it belongs.A stinging commentary on democracy, sexual mores and hypocrisy, the film pokes fun at nearly everyone in its path, and its exacting scalpel penetrates all the way to the bone.Directed by Alexander Payne with an appealing mix of tartness and sincerity, "Election" stars Matthew Broderick as Jim McAllister, an Omaha high school civics teacher whose dedication to his profession is equaled only by the adoration of his students.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 13, 2001
A smart comedy about a smart blonde - that would be a sensation. But a dumb comedy about a smart blonde turns out to be not bad. The name of the film is Legally Blonde, and from the title on it attempts to integrate Clueless and The Paper Chase. More important, the star - and the film's redemption - is Reese Witherspoon. She imbues Bel Air princess Elle Woods with the luster of an actor who knows this could be her ticket to the big time. She's so game and winning, you can't help cheering her on. Woods may be the sorority belle of her Southern California party college, but she's also a fashion-merchandising major with courses such as "The History of Polka Dots."
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By Lou Cedrone | November 19, 1991
''Man in the Moon,'' directed by Robert Mulligan (''To Kill a Mockingbird''), is a bittersweet comedy-tragedy that returns to a genre that was popular when movies didn't have to make or break it with sci-fi themes and stars like Arnold Schwarzenegger.Today, the film seems old-fashioned but old-fashioned in a very nice way. While it is true that the movie is small, it is also pleasantly evocative of an era that has passed, a time when parents worried about their daughters and maybe a little less about their sons.
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December 26, 2008
Yes Man ** ( 2 STARS) $18.3 million $18.3 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 104 minutes What it's about: All the grooviness that descends on a negative guy (Jim Carrey, above) when he makes a covenant with a self-help guru (Terence Stamp) to say "Yes!" to everything in life. Our take: Most of the good vibrations come from Zooey Deschanel, who plays a free-spirited club singer; she's the rare performer who can bring verve and body to eccentricity. Seven Pounds * ( 1 STAR)
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December 25, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 The Day the Earth Stood Still What it's about : Klaatu (Keanu Reeves, above), an alien in human form, and Gort, his bioengineered protector, want to save Earth, because it's one of the few orbs capable of supporting complex life.
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December 11, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems when he unexpectedly finds himself in New York, a continent away from his beloved owner, Penny. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Serious talent can overcome even the most hackneyed of movie plots, as Four Christmases proves. A surprisingly deft and sometimes hilarious variation on the well-worn "holidays+relatives=hell" story line (see Home for the Holidays, Christmas with the Kranks, Fred Claus, etc.), Four Christmases works because of some genuinely funny setups, a pace that never dwells on one gag (or even one family) too long and a careful mix of slapstick and bawdy humor. But mostly, the film works because of the astonishing acting talent the filmmakers brought together to make it. No fewer than five Oscar winners - Reese Witherspoon, Robert Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Mary Steenburgen and Jon Voight - get to show their funny sides in the films.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 19, 2007
Jake Gyllenhaal has been making the talk-show rounds articulating his resistance to movies that merely sell a message. One wonders what art or entertainment value he saw in the script of Rendition, a movie about the secret detention and torture of suspected terrorists that heats up its ingredients to Fahrenheit 9/11 levels yet renders them all as flat as a pile of communiques. Omar Metwally co-stars as Anwar, an Egyptian-born chemical engineer who falls out of sight after flying from South Africa back to the U.S., leaving his young son and pregnant wife Isabella (Reese Witherspoon)
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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 3, 2006
Think of the glamorous Loretta Young in the doorway of her make-believe, Hollywood home theatrically welcoming viewers to the Loretta Young Show (1954-1961 on CBS). Now, add a pencil-thin mustache to the host and move the doorway from California to Baltimore, and you more or less have the delightful opening for John Waters Presents Movies That Will Corrupt You - a 13 week film series starting today on here! - TV's first gay cable channel. The series begins with Freeway, a scary twist on Little Red Riding Hood with Reese Witherspoon and Kiefer Sutherland starring in the tale of a teenager going to grandma's house and a killer.
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