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Reefer Madness

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NEWS
By Henry Cohen | February 27, 1997
THE FEB. 14 editorial, ''Legislating from the hip,'' opposes an increase in the penalties for marijuana possession but seems to favor continuing to imprison users, reassuring us that ''even the most liberal politicians recognize that drug use, including marijuana use, is not a victimless crime but contributes significantly to domestic violence, street violence, property crime, child abuse and traffic deaths.''In fact, no politicians ''recognize'' this. One cannot recognize something that is false.
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NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 15, 2011
The militarization of the Mexican border is a new phenomenon for two nations whose militaries have traditionally been made to stay out of politics. There are constant expansions of our prisons, and further explosions of the drug-related caseloads of our state and federal courts. No one can think that our illicit drug industry survives without complicity in the Border Patrol, Drug Enforcement Agency, Coast Guard and local sheriffs' offices. It is not for nothing that J. Edgar Hoover demanded that a separate agency be set up for drug enforcement because of its potentially corrupting effects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 4, 2003
Last year, Eric Schlosser's book, Fast Food Nation, was an enormous success, and rightly so. It did an arresting, keenly focused job of revealing the evils of fast food production, sales and consumption in the United States and beyond. A staff correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly since 1996, he has written for several national magazines. Now comes his Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market (Houghton Mifflin, 310 pages, $23), for which intense promotion is piggybacking on his previous success.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Mike Gimbel, in his letter to the editor ( "As dangers become clear, states shy away from medical marijuana," Feb. 15), inadvertently used the outmoded and long discredited "Reefer Madness" model in citing "two new reports" suggesting the dangers of marijuana. Did it ever occur to Mr. Gimbel that alcohol abuse also causes psychosis? Is he ignorant of the damage done to individuals and society from alcohol every year? And I'm not just referring to traffic accidents and deaths from drunk driving.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 16, 2005
Showtime's Reefer Madness is a made-for-TV movie version of a Broadway play about a film that became a camp classic almost from the time of its debut in the 1930s. Got that? TV movies about movies, plays about previous plays - that's pop culture today mired in a postmodern funk, cannibalizing works of Hollywood Past over and over in a seemingly endless loop that gets less and less rewarding with each turn. And everything is wrapped in irony and a smug superiority to generations past. The original Reefer Madness was a work of hysteria warning parents of the evil ways in which marijuana could ruin their children's lives.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Mike Gimbel, in his letter to the editor ( "As dangers become clear, states shy away from medical marijuana," Feb. 15), inadvertently used the outmoded and long discredited "Reefer Madness" model in citing "two new reports" suggesting the dangers of marijuana. Did it ever occur to Mr. Gimbel that alcohol abuse also causes psychosis? Is he ignorant of the damage done to individuals and society from alcohol every year? And I'm not just referring to traffic accidents and deaths from drunk driving.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
James Forman, 76, a civil rights pioneer credited with organizing the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, died Monday of colon cancer at a hospice in Washington. He was a native of Chicago who grew up in Mississippi. He participated in the "Freedom Rides" in which blacks rode across the South as a way to make sure buses were integrated as ordered by the courts. He used his post as executive secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee from 1961 to 1966 to strengthen the resolve of civil rights protesters and seek slavery reparations for blacks.
NEWS
February 19, 2003
Drug policies hurt people with medical needs Few Americans realize that the United States may soon be one the few Western countries that uses its justice system to punish otherwise law-abiding citizens who prefer marijuana to martinis ("Reefer madness," editorial, Feb. 9). Evidence of the U.S. government's reefer madness is best exemplified by the kangaroo court trial of Ed Rosenthal, who grew marijuana for medical use. By denying an officer of the city of Oakland the ability to use California's medical marijuana law as a defense, the judge foisted a predetermined guilty verdict onto a misinformed jury.
NEWS
February 9, 2003
ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft's cruel crusade against the medical use of marijuana backfired last week. In an extraordinary display that should thoroughly discredit the endeavor, federal jurors in California held a press conference to apologize to the man they had just convicted of cultivating pot - an offense with a mandatory five-year prison sentence. Jurors were outraged to discover after the trial that the defendant, Ed Rosenthal, was growing medical cannabis for the city of Oakland for use by critically ill patients under California's medical marijuana law. The judge wouldn't allow that defense to be raised because federal law doesn't permit the use of marijuana for medical purposes.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 15, 2011
The militarization of the Mexican border is a new phenomenon for two nations whose militaries have traditionally been made to stay out of politics. There are constant expansions of our prisons, and further explosions of the drug-related caseloads of our state and federal courts. No one can think that our illicit drug industry survives without complicity in the Border Patrol, Drug Enforcement Agency, Coast Guard and local sheriffs' offices. It is not for nothing that J. Edgar Hoover demanded that a separate agency be set up for drug enforcement because of its potentially corrupting effects.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 16, 2005
Showtime's Reefer Madness is a made-for-TV movie version of a Broadway play about a film that became a camp classic almost from the time of its debut in the 1930s. Got that? TV movies about movies, plays about previous plays - that's pop culture today mired in a postmodern funk, cannibalizing works of Hollywood Past over and over in a seemingly endless loop that gets less and less rewarding with each turn. And everything is wrapped in irony and a smug superiority to generations past. The original Reefer Madness was a work of hysteria warning parents of the evil ways in which marijuana could ruin their children's lives.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
James Forman, 76, a civil rights pioneer credited with organizing the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, died Monday of colon cancer at a hospice in Washington. He was a native of Chicago who grew up in Mississippi. He participated in the "Freedom Rides" in which blacks rode across the South as a way to make sure buses were integrated as ordered by the courts. He used his post as executive secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee from 1961 to 1966 to strengthen the resolve of civil rights protesters and seek slavery reparations for blacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 4, 2003
Last year, Eric Schlosser's book, Fast Food Nation, was an enormous success, and rightly so. It did an arresting, keenly focused job of revealing the evils of fast food production, sales and consumption in the United States and beyond. A staff correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly since 1996, he has written for several national magazines. Now comes his Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market (Houghton Mifflin, 310 pages, $23), for which intense promotion is piggybacking on his previous success.
NEWS
February 19, 2003
Drug policies hurt people with medical needs Few Americans realize that the United States may soon be one the few Western countries that uses its justice system to punish otherwise law-abiding citizens who prefer marijuana to martinis ("Reefer madness," editorial, Feb. 9). Evidence of the U.S. government's reefer madness is best exemplified by the kangaroo court trial of Ed Rosenthal, who grew marijuana for medical use. By denying an officer of the city of Oakland the ability to use California's medical marijuana law as a defense, the judge foisted a predetermined guilty verdict onto a misinformed jury.
NEWS
February 9, 2003
ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft's cruel crusade against the medical use of marijuana backfired last week. In an extraordinary display that should thoroughly discredit the endeavor, federal jurors in California held a press conference to apologize to the man they had just convicted of cultivating pot - an offense with a mandatory five-year prison sentence. Jurors were outraged to discover after the trial that the defendant, Ed Rosenthal, was growing medical cannabis for the city of Oakland for use by critically ill patients under California's medical marijuana law. The judge wouldn't allow that defense to be raised because federal law doesn't permit the use of marijuana for medical purposes.
NEWS
By Henry Cohen | February 27, 1997
THE FEB. 14 editorial, ''Legislating from the hip,'' opposes an increase in the penalties for marijuana possession but seems to favor continuing to imprison users, reassuring us that ''even the most liberal politicians recognize that drug use, including marijuana use, is not a victimless crime but contributes significantly to domestic violence, street violence, property crime, child abuse and traffic deaths.''In fact, no politicians ''recognize'' this. One cannot recognize something that is false.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
According to The Sun, Maryland legislators will pass a bill that would decriminalize possession of 10 grams or less of pot ( "Assembly set to pass wage, marijuana bills," April 7). This is a breakthrough bill, especially promoted by the Black Caucus, that should be signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley. For far too long the government has continued unabated in its efforts to destroy lives for a simple possession charge of small amounts of weed. It's well past the time to stop the real "reefer madness" of our times, the annual national incarceration of 800,000 people for marijuana use. The lunacy of the past government practices has fallen on the convicted as they struggle to find work with a tainted record.
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