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By CANDUS THOMSON | November 18, 2007
When the Temple M pulled out of St. Jerome Creek last week and headed east for Point No Point, another charter boat already was sitting atop the artificial reef and working birds wheeled in the misty-gray sky above. A good sign. Although several of us positively twitched at the thought of grabbing rods from the overhead racks and joining the party, work was on our agenda. We wanted to see the recently completed reef off St. Mary's County from the bottom up. The deck of Capt. Greg Madjeski's boat, from cabin to stern, was decorated in wet suits, dry suits, oxygen bottles and high-tech camera equipment.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
A massive barge dumped 1,000 tons of concrete slabs on the floor of the Chesapeake Bay yesterday to begin construction of the state's fourth artificial reef. The site at the mouth of the Choptank River, known as "The Gooses," was once a popular fishing spot that could attract 100 boats in its heyday. Its yield, however, gradually diminished as silt covered the hard bottom. Marty Gary, a fisheries biologist who is overseeing the work for the Department of Natural Resources, said that when construction is complete, the Gooses will be "the crown jewel of the Chesapeake's artificial reefs" to serve as habitat for fish, oysters and crabs.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Although it has been more than 11 years since Memorial Stadium was demolished, much of the concrete that once made up the bygone home of the Orioles, Colts and Ravens continues to host a hotbed of activity nearly 18 miles southeast of its previous location. In 2002, approximately 10,000 cubic yards of rubble from the stadium was deposited over a 6-acre site on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, 3 miles west of Tolchester Beach in Kent County. Every year since then, the Perry Hall chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association has organized the construction and placement of reef balls - hollow, flat-bottomed concrete blobs with holes - on a 1-acre section of the Memorial Stadium reef.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
Plans to drop rubble from the soon-to-be-demolished old Severn River Bridge into the water to create an oyster reef are back on track.Officials at the state Board of Public Works revised permits late Tuesday, eliminating a crucial time restriction that threatened to kill the experimental conservation project, said William Moulden, the Sherwood Forest naturalist who devised the project.The Maryland Department of Natural Resources' tidal wetlands permit, issued in July, stipulated no work could take place between Oct. 1 and March 31, so as not to disturb migratory birds who use the area as a stopover.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | April 21, 1991
On Wednesday, the Department of Natural Resources an representatives of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association put overboard 5,000 pounds of structure to replenish the state fishing reef off Love Point at the mouth of the Chester River.The tonnage of concrete-and-tires, donated and constructed by the MSSA at a cost of nearly $5,000, was placed in about 28 feet of water.In all, the MSSA membership has made available 200 blocks of low density concrete, each studded with four automobile tires.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | July 29, 2007
Ayear into Maryland's artificial reef-building program and, on the surface, there's nothing to show for it. That's the way it is with projects that are on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay. You can't see it, like bay grasses. Or hear it, like the new "smart" buoy at the mouth of the Patapsco River that passes along water quality measurements and history and cultural nuggets to your cell phone and home computer. Or smell it, like wildflower plantings in the Interstate 95 median. But MARI, as the Maryland Artificial Reef Initiative is called, is making progress.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 18, 2007
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will spend about $40,000 to remove a concrete oyster reef that contractors placed in waters near the Magothy River that are too shallow to support it. The reef, which was planted in Sillery Bay near Gibson Island in Anne Arundel County two months ago, is part of the agency's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay's struggling oyster beds by growing oysters on artificial surfaces. For decades, the state planted oysters on shells dredged from the bay but is now using concrete because shells are scarce.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 7, 2007
Remember fishing the Summer Gooses in its heyday? It wasn't that long ago. Come the dog days each year, boats - up to 100 of them - used to sit atop one of the greatest hard-bottom areas on the Chesapeake Bay, chumming. Glistening, fat striped bass came over the sides of boats in nets held by straining anglers-maybe you were one of them about a decade ago. But a slow-motion avalanche of silt buried that prime spot. Although boats still make a pass for old time's sake, in the eyes of most, the Gooses are cooked.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
Plans to build an artificial reef in the Patapsco River off Fort Smallwood Park were scrapped this week because the Maryland Port Authority objected that it would be too close to Baltimore's shipping lanes."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 13, 2013
Some long-gone oysters from prehistoric times are going to play a role in restoring the Chesapeake Bay's current crop of bivalves. Maryland has purchased 112,500 tons of fossilized oyster shells for $6.3 million from a quarry in the panhandle of Florida, officials announced Friday. The first 25-car trainload has been offloaded into barges in Baltimore for the last leg of its journey to Harris Creek , a tidal Eastern Shore water way targeted by the state for an ambitious effort to replenish the bay's depleted oyster population.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A dozen sharks were spied in Baltimore waters Monday. Their arrival was greeted with smiles and much applause. The first of 20 blacktip reef sharks that will be calling Baltimore's National Aquarium home were released into their new digs Monday. The sharks are the centerpiece of the aquarium's $13 million Blacktip Reef exhibit, a re-creation of a piece of Australia's Great Barrier Reef that replaces the popular multi-level Wings in the Water exhibit of rays. The remaining eight sharks, which are distinguished by the dark black coloring on the tips of their fins, will be released Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
The National Aquarium's new $12.5 million "Blacktip Reef" exhibit, a replica of an Indo-Pacific coral reef that replaces the "Wings in the Water" exhibit, will open July 10, officials announced Monday. Once it is completed, visitors will be able to view the 260,000-gallon self-contained ecosystem through a 27-foot viewing window, as well as from platforms above the water. Visitors also will be able to observe diver demonstrations and feedings. "You're sort of transferred into their world," Jack Cover, the aquarium's general curator, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A planned $12.5 million coral reef exhibit will be the first step toward a rejuvenated National Aquarium, officials said this week. The Wings in the Water exhibit, the centerpiece of the Pier 3 Pavilion and a home for rays, sharks and other large fish, will be turned into what officials are calling Blacktip Reef. The replica of an Indo-Pacific Coral Reef - thinkAustralia'sGreat Barrier Reef, though much smaller - it will be home to a school of more than a dozen sharks, plus other creatures that call such habitats home.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
A new colorful, watery world of sand, coral and 43 kinds of fishes has been created at the National Aquarium. Inch by inch, a team of curators, biologists and designers built a coral reef from concrete, polyurethane and fiberglass. Drop by drop, they filled its tank with 335,000 gallons of salt water. And sea creature by sea creature, they made it come alive.Now French angelfish and grunts, trigger fish and tripletails, jacks and jolthead porgies, lookdowns and spiny lobsters are settling into a new home.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
ABOARD THE YNOT MABEL - A massive front-end loader wrestled more than 40 stainless steel New York City subway cars off a barge yesterday, swinging them one by one over the gray, choppy water before releasing them with a splash. Some of the cars lingered briefly on the surface before heading for the ocean bottom 85 feet below. Others rolled on their side, emitting hisses as water rushed in and air escaped, creating tiny geysers like whales exhaling. One by one, they became Maryland's most-ambitious offshore artificial reef project to create homes for fish and an underwater playground for divers.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2012
Efforts to restore native oysters in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay are about to begin in earnest, as state and federal officials air plans to conduct large-scale reef rebuilding projects in Harris Creek on the Eastern Shore. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources , along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the US. Army Corps of Engineers , are scheduled to present their plans for oyster restoration work in Harris Creek from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Concrete that once blocked fish from swimming up the Patapsco River to spawn has a new life as home for aquatic creatures at the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay. Water cannons blasted chunks of the demolished Simkins Dam off a barge Wednesday, completing the structure's transition from a river barrier to an oyster reef the size of two football fields. On Thursday and Monday, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation will seed the site at the mouth of the Chester River with 4 million baby oysters.
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