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NEWS
July 8, 1991
Baltimore's Planning Commission has at last conceded what urban planners have known for decades: Promises of tax revenue can never be the sole concern in urban development conflicts.The current conflict, which had been languishing in the commission for almost a year, was whether to endorse three city council bills to allow developer Leonard Attman to buy one lane of Redwood Street and build a $90 million office tower at the southeast corner of Redwood and Charles. The project was plagued by controversy from the start -- primarily because it asks the city to sell public land to a private developer for purely private purposes, but also because the sale risks altering the ambience of the area and threatens traffic congestion and parking problems as well.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
The drivers whizzing along Redwood Street through the heart of the city's old business district, which was once lined with brokerage houses, banks, the stock exchange and the old Merchants Club, probably have no idea for whom it is named. Late last year, James Carl Nelson's book "Five Lieutenants," which told the story of five Harvard men who fought on the Western Front during World War I, was published. One of those men was George Buchanan Redwood, a newspaperman and editor who worked for the Baltimore News and was a member of the Harvard Class of 1910.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | November 19, 1991
One week after abandoning plans to buy a lane of Redwood Street to enlarge his construction site for the Baltimore Financial Centre office tower, developer Leonard Attman has come up with a design for a more slender tower that would not take away the street.Mr. Attman's architects unveiled plans yesterday for a tower at the southeast corner of Redwood and Charles streets that would be as tall as earlier planned buildings -- 32 stories -- but which had 18 feet shaved off the north side.It was the second major revision in six months for the $90 million project, which is being designed to take the place of the mid-rise buildings at 15, 17 and 19 S. Charles St.The revised tower would have 388,000 square feet of space -- down from 447,900 square feet provided in a June 1991 plan and 484,500 square feet in a design unveiled in late 1990 that would have covered two lanes of Redwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Nicholas Piscatelli's annus horribilis seems to be extending into 2012. On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Appeals sided against the developer in a four-year-old libel lawsuit against Baltimore City Paper.  Meanwhile, his former megaclub, Redwood Trust , is still up for sale, and at half the price from when it was first listed six years ago. Last year, Piscatelli tried to auction off 200 E. Redwood, the nearly 130-year-old building...
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
Baltimore's older, much maligned downtown office market received a boost yesterday when a Laurel-based construction firm purchased the Redwood Center office complex and earmarked it for a $10 million refurbishment.Orion Construction Corp.'s plan for the long vacant two-building complex at Calvert and Redwood streets calls for an eight-story building at 131 E. Redwood St. -- the 90-year-old former headquarters for USF&G Corp. -- to be renovated for office use.An adjacent 12-story structure is expected to be razed this winter to make way for a mixed-use building with parking, retail and office space.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1997
The city's economic development agency yesterday awarded a contract to lease and manage a 20-story office building it owns downtown to Colliers Pinkard, the second time the Baltimore real estate firm has been selected for the job.The Baltimore Development Corp.'s decision to award leasing and management of 7 E. Redwood St. to Pinkard over five other firms came after the city's Board of Estimates, in May, overturned a BDC decision to give Pinkard the assignment on a no-bid basis.Pinkard is expected to receive roughly $500,000 to lease and manage the 157,000-square-foot building, which the city bought as part of a deal to keep Legg Mason Inc.'s headquarters downtown.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
A Laurel construction company has filed a plan with the city to raze a portion of the Redwood Center office complex downtown in the hopes of reviving the derelict property.Orion Construction Corp.'s plan for the two-building complex at the intersection of Calvert and Redwood streets calls for the demolition of a vacant 12-story office tower at 26 S. Calvert St., as well as the purchase from the city of Mercer Street, which splits the two structures.Orion intends to replace the razed building and a portion of the street with a 300-space parking garage, according to plans filed with the city.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | February 15, 1991
Trying to smooth over differences with neighboring businesses, the developers of the proposed Baltimore FinancialCentre are offering to amend their plans to close a portion of Redwood Street in downtown Baltimore.Charles/Redwood Limited Partnership, the development team that wants to build a 32-story office tower at the corner of Redwood and Charles streets, is offering to narrow the project by 10 feet. Instead of taking two lanes of Redwood as the developers had asked to do, the project would take one lane.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
A local developer believes two historic office buildings in downtown Baltimore can be converted successfully to apartments, even though their Washington-based owner is contemplating demolition.J. Joseph Clarke, head of Clarke Enterprises and husband of City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, is part of a team that has studied the former Redwood Center office buildings at Redwood and Calvert streets. He believes they would be ideal for conversion to 132 apartments for stockbrokers, attorneys and others who work in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
The owner of yet another downtown property, unable to market it in the recession, has begun to explore the idea of demolition.First the Manekin Corp. tore down the Tower building. The Rouse Co. leveled the McCormick building. Then Constellation Real Estate started toppling the Terminal Building.The owners of the Southern Hotel want to do the same.The latest property owner to get the idea is Riggs National Bank of Washington. It is contemplating demolition of not one, but two, historic office buildings in the heart of Baltimore's financial district.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
In a "grueling" 18-hour auction that finished early Wednesday, Erickson Retirement Communities selected a local investment firm over a New York bidder as its buyer - part of the effort to bring the Catonsville senior-living firm out of bankruptcy reorganization. Erickson did not disclose the terms of the transaction but said Hanover-based Redwood Capital Investments LLC was the successful bidder in the auction, which put on the block almost all of the company's assets. The sale will require bankruptcy court approval.
TRAVEL
By Rachel Leibrock and Rachel Leibrock,McClatchy-Tribune | March 16, 2008
MUIR WOODS NATIONAL MONUMENT, Calif. -- It takes a moment for the realization to sink in: We are 12 miles from San Francisco - one of the busiest, most bustling, loudest cities - yet I can't hear a sound. It's a warm, sunny weekday afternoon, but here beneath Muir Woods' majestic canopy of redwood trees, just a traffic jam north of the Golden Gate Bridge, it's shady, cool and mind-alteringly relaxing. It's been 100 years since President Theodore Roosevelt declared Muir Woods a national monument, ensuring its preservation as an oasis of natural beauty amid urban chaos.
BUSINESS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 10, 2007
First it was to be apartments, then condominiums and now it looks like a $25 million hotel is in the works for a prime downtown corner. Developers behind One East Redwood, an elaborate melding of three radically different buildings at South Charles and Redwood streets, say they're adapting their plans to accommodate changing market forces. "With the condo market softening, the opportunity opened for a hotel," said Crispin Etherington, one of the partners behind Charles Redwood Group LLC. "The hotels we're talking to both want to be in our location."
TRAVEL
October 23, 2005
I recently took this photo of a mighty redwood at Humboldt Redwoods State Park in Northern California. Humboldt is the home of a magnificent forest of ancient redwood trees. Being there was like visiting an outdoor cathedral. It was both a spiritual and a mystical experience. William Hughes Baltimore
TRAVEL
By Chris Dixon and Chris Dixon,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 2005
South of Oregon and far north of the Golden Gate, the Pacific coastal road retreats inland, bypassing 120 miles of wild, rugged shoreline aptly called the Lost Coast. In this isolated pocket of gargantuan redwoods, surf-pounded mountains and hidden valleys, there's scant access to road-trip staples like cell-phone connections and four-lane asphalt. But brave the bumps and guardrail-free switchbacks of the lonely Lost Coast roads, and you'll drive into a wild, majestic California little changed from the time when today's 2,000-year-old redwoods were just seedlings.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 29, 2004
The northeast corner of Light and Redwood streets has long been a place for people on the move - most recently as the site of the 14-story Southern Hotel and before that as the setting for the historic Fountain Inn. But it may soon be the address for people who want to make downtown Baltimore their more permanent home, if the owners proceed with their latest redevelopment plan. Seeking to tap into the growing market for upscale housing in Baltimore's central business district, J. Joseph Clarke Enterprises and Capital Guidance Corp.
NEWS
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,NIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 24, 2000
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The tree arrived in a little box and without fanfare close to four decades ago, a seedling given by a brother in California to his sister here. For years it grew in a pot until Cary Ellen Howie decided, finally, it was big enough to go in the ground. And there it is today, rising gracefully to 51 feet, about five stories tall, in her backyard. In a city filled with pines, poplars and oaks soaring to 100 feet and higher, one might not think twice about a tree half that height.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Real estate developer Leonard Attman won key city approval last night in his campaign to build a controversial office building that would overhang the sidewalk at the corner of Charles and Redwood streets.The city planning commission gave its blessing to a city council bill that would authorize selling Mr. Attman the air rights needed to build his proposed 29-story building.Mr. Attman has been trying to get his building approved since 1990 but has been blocked because his plans called for condemning part of Redwood Street to allow for a larger building.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2004
The historic USF&G Corp. building, once destined for demolition, will show off an extreme makeover Thursday as downtown Baltimore's newest hotel -- a Hampton Inn & Suites. The $22 million transformation of the 1906 building at Calvert and Redwood streets has been in progress for about three years. "Our concept was to take the historic building and restore the historic areas, and everywhere else to make sure that the customer had all the modern amenities that could be afforded into a hotel," said Rick Diehl, one of the principals of Baltimore-based Focus Development LLC, which developed the hotel.
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