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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
A group of influential clergy members representing almost every part of Baltimore met with the city's acting police commissioner yesterday and promised to work in partnership to reduce crime. The two-hour meeting at St. Paul Community Baptist Church in East Baltimore was sponsored by the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, whose leader has expressed concern over the new police leader's aggressive crime-fighting strategies, modeled on New York's. After the private meeting, the alliance's president, the Rev. Douglas I. Miles, called on clergy to "ensure that quality-of-life policing is an effective reality.
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NEWS
By Karen Stokes | March 13, 2014
The homicide rate in Baltimore is high, and everyone - from bloggers to elected officials to nonprofit leaders - is talking about it. Some are throwing up their hands in despair, while others are hoping that yet another crime-fighting innovation will somehow save the day. What is getting ignored are the real factors that lead to high crime rates: kids without something constructive to do after school, adults without employment prospects, and neighborhoods...
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
Walking down Rogers Avenue near Arlington Elementary School, pointing out homes with nicely trimmed lawns and well-kept porches, Baltimore Police Lt. Edward Jackson pauses at a rowhouse with boarded-up windows and broken vodka bottles littering the yard.Not long ago, Jackson would have driven by, rushing to a shooting scene or back to the Northwestern District station house, barely noticing the decaying homes that invite crime.But that attitude changed last month, when police lieutenants were assigned specific neighborhoods to oversee, tying their success to that of the communities they serve.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
My husband and I live two blocks from where the break-in and murder of a Canton woman took place ( "Second teen denied bail in killing ," Feb. 4). Surprisingly, it's not the murder that scares me, it's the lack of response by our city officials to make some simple changes that would help with crime. One street light and two park lights have been out for many months, and it's pitch black on our street at night. We've reported this repeatedly. The city told us it's Baltimore Gas and Electric's responsibility to fix the street light while BGE said it's the city's responsibility, and there's no movement at all with the park lights.
NEWS
September 9, 2001
STATE handgun registration and licensing laws make it harder for criminals to get guns. That's the thrust of a federally funded study by the Center for Gun Policy and Research at Johns Hopkins University. But does the combination of these restrictive laws -- in force in only seven states -- actually reduce gun crime or criminal activity? That is the fundamental question unanswered by the two-year study, released as California legislators are poised to add licensing to the state's registration law. Looking at 25 cities in 23 states, including Baltimore and Maryland, the Hopkins researchers tried to examine how state laws can influence gun trafficking.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark says his strategies are beginning to reduce crime and pointed to a sharp decrease in shootings and an eight-day respite from homicides as evidence the department is heading in the right direction. "It's definitely having the effect we want," Clark said of his strategies. The commissioner joined the force in February pledging to clear open-air drug markets and to drive drug dealers indoors. That tactic is supposed to reduce violence and other crimes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
Two more Baltimore police colonels have announced their retirements, giving the city's new mayor and police commissioner a clean slate from which to remake the force and embark on their ambitious plan to reduce crime and homicides. Cols. Alvin A. Winkler and Robert F. Smith told their staffs Thursday that they will step down Jan. 31. Col. John E. Gavrilis announced his departure last week. The three commanders have 84 years of combined experience. The retirements were made public yesterday, the day Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel took charge of the 3,200-member force.
NEWS
July 21, 1994
Several words were omitted from a letter to the editor by William Banks published Monday.The sentence should have read, "The idea that by giving honest people $107.11 worth of merchandise for antiques or firearms which have been sitting in closets for 30 years, 7-Eleven will reduce crime, is hilarious."+ The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
Republican Roscoe G. Bartlett's stand on some issues of the 1994 6th District congressional race.* Crime: Stiffer sentences for violent criminals. Make inmates serve entire sentences. Reduce crime by getting repeat criminals off the street. Remove appeals on death penalty cases.* Health care reform: Reform proposals must encourage competition and make consumers careful shoppers. Get away from third-party payer system. Address problem of losing benefits when people switch jobs. Have employee, not employer, own coverage.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
The Tri-District Republican Club welcomes the public to hear U.S. Senate candidate Joseph Cassilly of Bel Air speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Mount Zion Methodist Church, 3006 Old Westminster Pike.Cassilly, the Harford County state's attorney, has filed to run against Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski. He will speak on "How Our Current Leaders Have Failed to Provide a Steady Plan to Reduce Crime in America."A decorated Vietnam veteran, Cassilly will discuss why the federal government, especially Congress, must be more effective in providing leadership to reduce the growing crime and drug problems locally.
NEWS
By Aisha Braveboy | July 23, 2013
If the state of Maryland is serious about reducing crime, we need to be more proactive about preventive programs and seriously consider diversion programs for our youth. The recent ACLU report on arrests for marijuana possession and The Sun's June 8 editorial "Maryland's New Jim Crow" have brought much needed attention to mass incarceration in the Maryland criminal justice system. The ACLU's report raises broader questions about criminal justice policies in our state. Is mass incarceration for petty offenses a good use of public resources?
NEWS
June 27, 2013
The solution to Baltimore's crime problem ("Amid wave of 27 Baltimore shootings, police press for tips," June 26) is as simple as A, B and C. A. Put more feet on the street. It has been demonstrated before that more police on the street beat deters neighborhood crime. To accommodate this, sell half the patrol cars and take air conditioning out of the rest. B. Strengthen a regional coalition of law enforcement agencies in the city and surrounding jurisdictions to improve communication and cooperation.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
The recent editorial in The Sun ("Stopping the killing," March 24) argues the police should be focusing on guns and violent offenders. Clearly, there is value in having the police take as many guns off the street as possible, and strategies that engage hard-core violent offenders make a difference. That is why Commissioner Anthony Batts and his command staff have made guns, gangs and violent offenders the key elements of a strategy with five areas of focus aimed at reducing the unacceptable level of homicides in the city.
NEWS
March 23, 2013
Sen. Robert Zirkin's bill decriminalizing possession of small amounts of cannabis is a small step in the right direction for justice, but it will do little good for reducing gun crime in Maryland ("Advocates for legal marijuana take first steps," March 20). Only legalization can do that. The United States' nearly $150 billion-a-year black market drug economy creates such a huge demand for illegal guns that it is a subsidy for the cheap proliferation of firearms to all would-be criminals seeking to escalate their criminality with cop killing deadly force.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
A line of cars snaked around the government office parking lot, down Bendix Road and for up to half a mile along Route 108 in the late morning and the afternoon, as people waited for hours to trade in guns to Howard County police for crisp $100 bills. At the end of the day police had recovered 631 guns and at 2:30 had to start turning cars away, officials said. The last time they tried a similar effort in 1995, the total number of guns collected was three. "We didn't know what to expect," said Chief William McMahon, but officials were pleased with the turnout.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Neither the Constitution nor the wisest of laws will secure the liberty or happiness of a people whose manners are corrupt. Passing new restrictions on guns will not reduce crime. Patrick Henry
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
An enraged Baltimore police commissioner stormed into the Western District station yesterday and read officers the riot act after he received an anonymous letter at home, purportedly written by an officer upset with the new district commander. Commissioner Edward T. Norris, accompanied by an entourage of top-level commanders and the chief of the Internal Affairs Division, defended the commander he promoted last month and blamed any problems on officers not willing to work hard enough to reduce crime.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 2, 1994
RICHMOND, Va. -- The packed hearing room fell silent as Jo Ann Bruce told a panel of legislators the grisly details of how her 22-year-old daughter was raped, sodomized and stabbed to death four years ago by a man previously convicted in two other assaults."
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Rounding up the usual suspects and putting officers on foot patrol for a few weeks are desperate moves by the Baltimore Police Department to temporarily shut down gun homicides before the nice weather arrives and street crime picks up with a vengeance ("6 killings continue violent 2013 start," March 5). Temporarily flooding the streets with foot patrols is feel-good initiative similar to gun buy-back programs. Violent crime in this town is gun driven, and officers on foot, unless they are jacking up every possible suspect they see while walking their beats, will probably just displace people with illegal guns to other parts of their district.
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