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By Antero Pietila | February 8, 2010
A small paid notice in Wednesday's Sun announced the death of Anne Irene Ruth Salzman at Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 97 and "was preceded in death by her husband of fifty years, Sidney Salzman," the notice said. Missing was the rest of the story -- how the Salzmans in 1941 fought the Federal Housing Administration for the right to live in a neighborhood of their own choosing. Much has changed since then, but studies suggest that each year millions of Americans still face similar discrimination -- not by the government, perhaps, but by the real estate marketplace.
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EXPLORE
June 13, 2013
Listening to the speech that Ken Ulman made on Monday, June 3 I was struck by his passion for Columbia. It is the same passion I have felt living in Columbia for 40 years. I too have loved this planned city that treats people equally. As proud as I am seeing one of our own named to the top of the ticket I am imbued with a sense of unease. One of the reasons many people came to Columbia was to live in a well thought out and carefully planned community. Columbia was the antidote to the hodgepodge exemplified by routes 1 and 40 and to escape the insidious and unethical practice of redlining!
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NEWS
May 5, 2010
Redlining is a strong word. For those of us who lived through times when African-Americans were denied opportunities, that word gets under our skin. This is why I see the careless use of it as misleading and irresponsible when discussing Verizon's FiOS not being in Baltimore City. FiOS is in several Maryland towns where the population is largely diverse — such as Bowie, Capitol Heights, Dundalk, Essex, Glen Burnie, Milford Mills, Randallstown, Seat Pleasant and Woodlawn.
NEWS
May 5, 2010
Redlining is a strong word. For those of us who lived through times when African-Americans were denied opportunities, that word gets under our skin. This is why I see the careless use of it as misleading and irresponsible when discussing Verizon's FiOS not being in Baltimore City. FiOS is in several Maryland towns where the population is largely diverse — such as Bowie, Capitol Heights, Dundalk, Essex, Glen Burnie, Milford Mills, Randallstown, Seat Pleasant and Woodlawn.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2013
Listening to the speech that Ken Ulman made on Monday, June 3 I was struck by his passion for Columbia. It is the same passion I have felt living in Columbia for 40 years. I too have loved this planned city that treats people equally. As proud as I am seeing one of our own named to the top of the ticket I am imbued with a sense of unease. One of the reasons many people came to Columbia was to live in a well thought out and carefully planned community. Columbia was the antidote to the hodgepodge exemplified by routes 1 and 40 and to escape the insidious and unethical practice of redlining!
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | July 31, 1994
Washington -- Here's the headline many congressmen up for election this November would like homeowners and buyers to read this week: "House passes tough anti-redlining home insurance legislation. Minority and low-income consumers to gain new fair housing protections."But here's the real headline: "House passes toothless bill" that will do virtually nothing to curb central city redlining in home insurance policy availability, pricing or coverage.By a voice vote July 20, the House defeated a bill approved by its banking committee that had the strong support of consumer, civil rights, and housing groups concerned about discriminatory home insurance practices in urban markets around the country.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | September 1, 1993
A community activist group representing low- and moderate-income homeowners in Baltimore charged yesterday that Allstate Insurance Co. is illegally discriminating against selected Baltimore neighborhoods and asked the state insurance commissioner to investigate."
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 1992
In a decision that expands the legal weapons used to combat housing discrimination, a U.S. appeals court has ruled that the federal Fair Housing Act prohibits "redlining" in insurance just as it does in mortgage lending.The decision by a three-judge federal appeals court panel in Chicago was hailed as "a major breakthrough" by fair-housing advocates because it brings the insurance industry under the same law that has been used in the past to attack discriminatory practices by banks, other mortgage lenders and real estate agents.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1994
Agreement reached on redliningAnother East Coast regional bank criticized for alleged redlining practices has agreed to change its lending policies and make loans to low-income neighborhoods in the Bronx.National Westminster Bancorp. said yesterday that it will lend in minority neighborhoods of the South Bronx and open an office there under an agreement with Inner City Press-Community On the Move, a group that accused the bank of redlining.The agreement follows a similar deal between the government and Chevy Chase Federal Savings Bank, a Maryland savings and loan charged in a civil suit with redlining -- refusing to lend in an area on the basis of its racial makeup.
NEWS
January 10, 2008
A spike in foreclosures can be seen across Baltimore: families moving out and houses ending up vacant and shuttered. The personal losses are devastating enough, but an investigation by the city suggests a disturbing trend - Baltimore's foreclosures are most prevalent in black neighborhoods, and it's not coincidental. The disproportionate rate, the city contends, is the result of an insidious and illegal practice, reverse redlining. The claims are at the center of an innovative lawsuit filed this week by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration against Wells Fargo Bank, one of the top two mortgage lenders in Baltimore in the past three years.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | February 8, 2010
A small paid notice in Wednesday's Sun announced the death of Anne Irene Ruth Salzman at Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 97 and "was preceded in death by her husband of fifty years, Sidney Salzman," the notice said. Missing was the rest of the story -- how the Salzmans in 1941 fought the Federal Housing Administration for the right to live in a neighborhood of their own choosing. Much has changed since then, but studies suggest that each year millions of Americans still face similar discrimination -- not by the government, perhaps, but by the real estate marketplace.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
Wells Fargo loan officers guided minorities toward high-rate mortgages and joked that they were "riding the stagecoach to hell" for routinely steering prime-loan-qualified customers toward subprime loans, according to sworn declarations by two former employees, filed in federal court this week. The affidavits were offered as evidence in a lawsuit filed on behalf of Baltimore last year and amended Monday, alleging "tens of millions" of dollars in losses from racist, predatory lending, known as "reverse redlining"- the targeting of minority borrowers, regardless of credit history, for unfavorable subprime loans.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY and KEN HARNEY,kenharney@earthlink.net | November 30, 2008
In what is apparently the first legal action of its kind, an association of community-based organizations has filed a federal civil rights complaint against two of the three largest Wall Street ratings agencies, charging that their inflated ratings on subprime mortgage bonds disproportionately caused financial harm to African-American and Latino homebuyers across the country. The complaint, filed by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, alleges that Moody's Investor Services and Fitch Ratings Ltd. enriched themselves by assigning high ratings to bonds backed by mortgages "that were designed to fail" because of "unfair payment terms and insufficient borrower income levels."
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | February 3, 2008
Critics call it the new redlining: Many of the country's largest mortgage lenders are imposing loan restrictions in entire counties or ZIP codes that they rank as risky or "declining." On Jan. 25, Countrywide Bank sent mortgage brokers a list that categorized hundreds of counties as "soft markets" with rankings from one to five, in ascending order of perceived risk. In areas rated in categories 4 and 5 -- roughly 100 counties in metropolitan areas nationwide -- Countrywide said it will now require down payments 5 percentage points larger from most applicants.
NEWS
January 10, 2008
A spike in foreclosures can be seen across Baltimore: families moving out and houses ending up vacant and shuttered. The personal losses are devastating enough, but an investigation by the city suggests a disturbing trend - Baltimore's foreclosures are most prevalent in black neighborhoods, and it's not coincidental. The disproportionate rate, the city contends, is the result of an insidious and illegal practice, reverse redlining. The claims are at the center of an innovative lawsuit filed this week by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration against Wells Fargo Bank, one of the top two mortgage lenders in Baltimore in the past three years.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2006
Mortgage lender SouthStar Funding LLC has agreed to discontinue a policy of refusing loans to buyers of rowhouses in Baltimore and pay $500,000 under a settlement with a fair lending group, the Department of Housing and Urban Development said yesterday. In a lending discrimination complaint filed with HUD in March, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition alleged that SouthStar excluded loans for rowhouses valued at less than $100,000 in all markets nationally and excluded loans for rowhouses of any value in Baltimore.
NEWS
February 28, 1998
Maryland needs more argument about abortionAfter reading The Sun's editorial "Keep abortion legal" (Feb. 18), I have to respond that Marylanders have not, in fact, argued long enough about the issue of abortion. We will have argued long enough about it when we decide to adopt the only civilized solution of banning it, and stop killing our own children.I find it incongruous that The Sun supports measures to make it easier for the state to take children away from their parents, and stands behind the mandatory sale of trigger locks on all guns, all in the interest of "our children's safety," and yet can somehow rationalize abortion, a decidedly unsafe procedure for the children involved.
NEWS
October 20, 2004
REMEMBER REDLINING, circa 1970? We may soon see a modern-day version of the old practice when banks drew invisible but detrimental geographical boundaries around poor urban and rural areas and refused to do business with them. Recent moves by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) and other banking regulatory agencies to water down a nearly 30-year-old law designed to ensure that banks provide lending, investment and basic banking services to poor communities are prompting fears of a return to the old days.
NEWS
August 29, 2001
A regional approach to certifying teachers could ease shortage University of Maryland Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg should be commended for his attention to issues surrounding the teacher shortage, and his sound recommendations should command the attention of education stakeholders ("Teacher shortage requires action," Aug. 19). However, one question remains: How can teachers gain the respect they deserve when their professional skills are not even recognized? Too often, state certification and licensure offices turn away teachers with the most experience and expertise from the classroom as unfit to teach in a new state or district until they take several courses or an expensive test.
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