Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRedistricting Commission
IN THE NEWS

Redistricting Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
The last time the Howard County Council tried to shift district boundary lines to conform with population growth, a two-year political fight ended in Circuit Court. The Democratic-controlled County Council proposed a redistricting plan in 1992 that Republican County Executive Charles I. Ecker thought went too far, so he vetoed it. The resulting political standoff left bitterness all around. But this time should be very different, Democrats and Republicans say, as each party prepares to submit names by tomorrow for the county's first redistricting commission, a compromise attempt to take the political sting out of the process that voters approved in 1996.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman announced Thursday that he would not sign off on a County Council bill redrawing district boundaries, instead endorsing a map supported by an appointed bipartisan commission. Under the new boundaries, the Columbia Association will be represented by an additional council district; two Ellicott City neighborhoods will move from their current district, despite residents' protests before the council; and parts of Elkridge will continue to bleed into District 2. The newly drawn council districts will take effect for the 2014 council elections.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
With a bitter redistricting battle still fresh in their memories, Howard County Council members favor creating a commission to help with the politically charged job of redrawing county election districts.The issue is sensitive because moving the lines of election districts can make politicians or ruin them. It can even shift the balance of party power throughout the county.At last night's County Council public hearing on the issue, speakers noted how inherently political redistricting -- and redistricting commissions -- can be."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Ellicott City blogger Frank Hecker has spent countless hours researching and writing about the history of council redistricting in Howard County — a topic he acknowledges is somewhat eye-glazing. "In and of itself, [redistricting] is not that interesting. What makes it interesting is it reflects the underlying politics in Howard County," Hecker, author of frankhecker.com, said Monday over hot chocolate at the Pottery Stop off U.S. 40. Hecker, a sales engineer for a California-based cybersecurity company, spent three to four hours writing each of the more than 20 1,000-word blog posts, which garner between 50 and 100 views.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
New census figures aren't out, but Howard County's politicians are feuding over who will draw new boundaries for County Council districts based on the new count. Instead of what was supposed to be a routine vote last night to confirm a resolution creating a seven-member redistricting commission, the council split 2-2 along party lines, killing the measure. Councilwoman Mary C. Lorsung, a west Columbia Democrat and the potential swing vote on the five-member council, was absent. The council's action delays creation of the panel for two months.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Edgewood residents want their area to have more political clout.That's what Edgewood resident Ralph DeBlasi told Harford County Redistricting Commission members at a public hearing Wednesday on the commission's proposal for new boundaries for County Council districts."
NEWS
By Andrew Green and Andrew Green,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2002
The Baltimore County Council's committee on redistricting endorsed wholesale changes yesterday to the re-mapping process that angered residents last summer. A few details have not been finalized, but the committee will recommend a charter amendment to take the initial drawing of district maps, done after every census, out of the County Council's hands. Instead, a separate commission would hold public hearings, study the data and propose maps. Four other re-mapping plans, all backed by potential or declared candidates for county offices, follow the same outline.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
Tomorrow night will be the first opportunity for Harford residents to voice their ideas on new boundaries for County Council districts.The public hearing, set for 7 in the council chambers at the CountyCourthouse in Bel Air, will focus on a redistricting proposal drafted by the Harford Redistricting Commission.The five-member commission's recommendation, one of two plans being considered by the council, would shift about 16 percent of county residents, or 28,887 people, into new districts.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
Some residents of County Council District B, which encompasses the Fallston area, might find themselves shifted into new voting districtscome election time in 1994.That's just one of the proposed changes a five-member Harford County Redistricting Commission is considering as it tries to ensure equal population representation in the six County Council districts."The main thing voters should care about is that their vote should have the same weight as someone else's vote," said commission member Glenn A. Brown.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
What began in July with five competing plans for redrawing the boundaries of Howard County Council districts was narrowed to one recommendation last night on a 4-3 party line vote. Democrats on the Howard County Councilmanic Redistricting Commission prevailed with a plan that concentrates the bulk of Democratic voters in three Columbia-based districts, while leaving most Republicans in the other two districts that cover the rural western county, Ellicott City and part of Elkridge. It is not a dramatic departure from current district lines.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2011
Appointments to the Baltimore County Councilmanic Redistricting Commission were announced Monday. Edward W. Crizer Jr., a member of the county Board of Appeals, will serve as the commission chair. The other members are James A. Gillis, a former special assistant to the county executive who works in the county state's attorney's office; Robert E. Latshaw Jr., a member of the county Planning Board and president of Latshaw Real Estate Advisors; Anne C. Neal, president of Neal Consulting Inc.; and Ralph W. Wright, a real estate agent with Long & Foster.
NEWS
By Andrew Green and Andrew Green,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2002
The Baltimore County Council's committee on redistricting endorsed wholesale changes yesterday to the re-mapping process that angered residents last summer. A few details have not been finalized, but the committee will recommend a charter amendment to take the initial drawing of district maps, done after every census, out of the County Council's hands. Instead, a separate commission would hold public hearings, study the data and propose maps. Four other re-mapping plans, all backed by potential or declared candidates for county offices, follow the same outline.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2002
A new commission charged with evaluating the Baltimore County Council redistricting process will enter a crowded field when it convenes next month - three reform proposals, all backed by county officials or candidates for public office, are already complete. The council named the commission of elder statesmen and other prominent residents last week. Members have said they want to see a process that is less secretive and based more on standards to ensure that new district lines reflect community demographics rather than political considerations.
NEWS
November 11, 2001
Difference of opinion on redistricting In response to Louis Pope's letter ("Democrats dominate council redistricting," Nov. 4) in Sunday's edition of The Sun in Howard County, I would like to take the opportunity to set the record straight on a couple of matters. While I was happy to see that Mr. Pope acknowledged the fact that the Councilmanic Redistricting Commission was created under a Republican majority County Council and a Republican County Executive, it should be noted that they created a BIPARTISAN commission, not a nonpartisan commission as he suggests.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
As the deadline nears for redrawing Harford County's council district lines, County Council members are weighing a plan submitted by a redistricting commission and a counterproposal introduced by a councilman who is unhappy with the panel's proposed changes. Rebuffing a commission's work would be nothing new for the council. The county has redistricted three times since 1972, when the council form of government was adopted. And not once has the council used the plan submitted by its appointed commissions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
What began in July with five competing plans for redrawing the boundaries of Howard County Council districts was narrowed to one recommendation last night on a 4-3 party line vote. Democrats on the Howard County Councilmanic Redistricting Commission prevailed with a plan that concentrates the bulk of Democratic voters in three Columbia-based districts, while leaving most Republicans in the other two districts that cover the rural western county, Ellicott City and part of Elkridge. It is not a dramatic departure from current district lines.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
As the deadline nears for redrawing Harford County's council district lines, County Council members are weighing a plan submitted by a redistricting commission and a counterproposal introduced by a councilman who is unhappy with the panel's proposed changes. Rebuffing a commission's work would be nothing new for the council. The county has redistricted three times since 1972, when the council form of government was adopted. And not once has the council used the plan submitted by its appointed commissions.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Ellicott City blogger Frank Hecker has spent countless hours researching and writing about the history of council redistricting in Howard County — a topic he acknowledges is somewhat eye-glazing. "In and of itself, [redistricting] is not that interesting. What makes it interesting is it reflects the underlying politics in Howard County," Hecker, author of frankhecker.com, said Monday over hot chocolate at the Pottery Stop off U.S. 40. Hecker, a sales engineer for a California-based cybersecurity company, spent three to four hours writing each of the more than 20 1,000-word blog posts, which garner between 50 and 100 views.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
When it comes to County Council redistricting, local government officials can pick their poison. Draft a plan in secret, present it to the public, and watch the angry crowds pour in - as in Baltimore County. Name a citizens commission and invite the public to say what they want - as at last night's Howard County Councilmanic Redistricting Commission hearing at Long Reach High School in Columbia - and 11 people appeared, with just three who wanted to speak. Why the poor response in Howard County?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
New census figures aren't out, but Howard County's politicians are feuding over who will draw new boundaries for County Council districts based on the new count. Instead of what was supposed to be a routine vote last night to confirm a resolution creating a seven-member redistricting commission, the council split 2-2 along party lines, killing the measure. Councilwoman Mary C. Lorsung, a west Columbia Democrat and the potential swing vote on the five-member council, was absent. The council's action delays creation of the panel for two months.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.