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NEWS
February 8, 2010
Let's say you are a governor and need your state legislature to renew a highly effective economic development program that has helped a single jurisdiction, albeit one with a high concentration of poverty, much more than the rest of your state. Would you: A. Patiently explain to lawmakers the program's benefits, the rare opportunity to match a proven strategy with a community in need, and expect them to do the right thing. B. Bribe them. If you chose A, you have probably just killed the Maryland Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit, a program that provides developers with a financial incentive to renovate older buildings that has helped bring an enormous amount of economic revitalization to Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 11, 2014
The University System of Maryland Board of Regents voted Thursday to sell the vacant and deteriorated former Hebrew Orphan Asylum in West Baltimore to the Coppin Heights Community Development Corp. for redevelopment as a community health center, according to a university spokesman. The land is currently owned by Coppin State University, which acquired it as part of a 7.3-acre, $680,000 purchase from the Lutheran Home and Hospital Foundation Inc. in 2003. The chancellor recommended that the board allow Coppin State University to move forward with sale of the property.
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NEWS
March 24, 2011
As the president of the largest trade group of commercial contractors in Maryland, I want to add my voice of support to the State Center redevelopment project planned for Midtown Baltimore. Given the tumultuous couple of years the construction industry has endured (of course, as difficult as things have been, we recognize that Maryland has fared significantly better than the rest of the country), State Center represents a tremendous opportunity for local contractors. But moreover, State Center represents a substantial opportunity for the fortunes of Baltimore and surrounding regions, as this project taps into the heart of the city's untapped market potential.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Developers of the Merritt Pavilion project in Dundalk say restaurant chains Chipotle, Panera and Five Guys are among tenants negotiating to lease space there. Baltimore County officials and Baltimore-based developer Vanguard also said this week they are working to address community concerns about the office and retail project, slated to be built at the site of the North Point Government Center. Residents packed a hearing in the spring to express concerns about traffic, a loss of community open space and disruption.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
We agree with the conclusion of The Sun's editorial about the Sustainable Communities Tax Credit of 2010 ("Rethinking redevelopment," Feb. 8) -- that the program has been a proven stimulus for economic development. However, its characterization of our motives in proposing changes to it was incorrect. When you have a program that has been successful for 14 years, you can: A. Rest on its laurels. B. Look for ways to improve it. The O'Malley administration chose B. In fact, the track record of the program as a catalyst for construction jobs and neighborhood revitalization was one reason for wanting it to be extended elsewhere -- to tightly defined places jointly identified by the state and local governments where growth should be channeled.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum today looks onto a tree stump and a grassy lot, but that view could soon change with the construction of two large, orange-accented apartment buildings. It's the first phase of a long-awaited redevelopment of the Poppleton area. The go-ahead last week from the city's urban design and architecture review panel is one of the first steps forward since ambitious plans to overhaul a 13.8-acre portion of the neighborhood were announced almost a decade ago. Just west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the $800 million, 10-year redevelopment of Poppleton is supposed to build on the expansion of the University of Maryland's BioPark and ultimately create more than 1,000 residential units, a new charter school, shopping and parks in a neighborhood once riddled with crime and drug activity.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Howard school officials have told the County Council that the plan to redevelop central Columbia could leave them without good ways to deal with unexpected school crowding once the work is in progress. Meanwhile, the council received assurances of cooperation on the plan to renovate Merriweather Post Pavilion and integrate it with Symphony Woods. The County Council discussed both topics last week, along with the dispute over affordable housing and issues involving environmental improvements and open space.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
I wish to respond to Mr. George Good's letter in which he complains about redevelopment in the Towson area (Towson Times, June 12). I certainly agree that Towson needs more and better open space, which is why our office has worked hard to make Towson greener at the same time we are redeveloping the commercial core. During the last rezoning cycle, our office initiated the most extensive downzoning of land in recent history in the Towson area. At my urging, the Baltimore County Council downzoned 67 acres of land to limit future development in Towson's neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | January 24, 2014
Howard County government took the first step last week toward purchasing and redeveloping the Long Reach Village Center by introducing legislation designating the area as an urban renewal zone. The county announced its plans to buy a portion of the property, currently owned by Long Reach Village Associates, a spin-off of Pikesville-based Americas Realty, at a Long Reach Village Board meeting earlier this month. “The Long Reach community has long been concerned over the decline of the Village Center.
NEWS
By Bryan Dunn | March 22, 2011
Peter Angelos has a long history of philanthropy and has amply demonstrated his love for Baltimore over the years. Why, then, is he standing in the way of the desperately needed redevelopment of the State Center project? Our community group, Midtown Matters, has the goal of making Baltimore a better place to live. Our current focus is on the State Center project. The working-class communities surrounding the proposed revitalization area have worked tirelessly, for more than five years and through hundreds of meetings, to make this project a reality.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
NEWS
By Richard Eberhart Hall | June 25, 2014
Jacques Kelly 's recent column ("Movement to open more corner stores in Remington," June 21), could serve as testimony for why the Baltimore City Council should not eliminate corner stores in the city zoning code. Healthy, vibrant communities need a mix of land uses that fit their scale and other characteristics. The corner store, a community fixture of the past, can fill a need throughout Baltimore and elsewhere. As we've learned over and over again, older, organic development patterns are often preferable to those driven by auto-dependent design.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
City police were investigating a shooting Monday afternoon at the Old Town Mall, the blighted outdoor shopping center that officials have pledged to redevelop. The shooting was reported at around 1:30 p.m., and the police said a man had been shot in the leg. At the scene, an overturned bicycle lay near a barber shop at the mall's east end, and police shut down Monument Street as an extension of the crime scene. A man was handcuffed and sitting on a curb inside the crime scene tape, while two blocks south officers placed another handcuffed man into a squad car and drove away.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum today looks onto a tree stump and a grassy lot, but that view could soon change with the construction of two large, orange-accented apartment buildings. It's the first phase of a long-awaited redevelopment of the Poppleton area. The go-ahead last week from the city's urban design and architecture review panel is one of the first steps forward since ambitious plans to overhaul a 13.8-acre portion of the neighborhood were announced almost a decade ago. Just west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the $800 million, 10-year redevelopment of Poppleton is supposed to build on the expansion of the University of Maryland's BioPark and ultimately create more than 1,000 residential units, a new charter school, shopping and parks in a neighborhood once riddled with crime and drug activity.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
A community input meeting on the redevelopment of the North Point Government Center in Dundalk is scheduled for Thursday evening. The meeting will be held 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Dundalk High School. Developers from Vanguard plan to present the company's proposal for revamping the site, which is now used for a variety of community activities. The firm wants to build a development called Merritt Pavilion, which would include restaurants, retail and offices. It also plans to construct a new recreational and arts facility, and to improve the ball fields.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Dundalk residents filled a high school auditorium Thursday night to speak out about the redevelopment of the North Point Government Center, many saying they fear they will lose out when restaurants and offices replace the community building. Vanguard Commercial Development wants to build a retail center called Merritt Pavilion at the site on Merritt Boulevard. The firm hosted a community meeting at Dundalk High School that became heated at times, with some speakers shouting at each other.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
Redevelopment and revitalization have emerged as key themes in the matchup between Democrat Vicki Almond and Republican Jon Herbst for the District 2 Baltimore County Council seat being vacated by Kevin Kamenetz, the Democratic nominee for county executive. To Almond, the strip malls dotted with vacant storefronts and clusters of gas stations and convenience stores in parts of the district indicate the need for comprehensive redevelopment plans, particularly for the Reisterstown Road corridor and downtown Pikesville.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Within the past five years, Shantress Wise says, she has been forced out of one home by a developer, evicted from another apartment after losing her job, and lived in two homeless shelters. Wise, of Baltimore, said the experience inspired her to join a spirited gathering of housing and community activists Saturday at an East Baltimore church to protest what they called unfair city housing policies and development that leaves the community out of the process. The group called upon the city to do more to house the homeless and to build additional affordable housing.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | March 13, 2014
The city's design panel gave a qualified go-ahead to a new $80 million mixed use project in Locust Point Thursday, marking another step in the evolution of the once dominantly industrial neighborhood. The roughly 10-story 900 E. Fort Avenue redevelopment, the product of a partnership that includes Bozzuto Development Company, sits on a large parcel at the entrance to Locust Point, where General Electric operated a service center for more than 40 years. Located on a key Locust Point corner, the project enters a neighborhood transformed over the last decade with the renovation of structures at Tide and Silo points, the addition of McHenry Row, and dozens of new townhomes.
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