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By Ray Richmond and Ray Richmond,Orange County Register | October 14, 1991
They don't make 'em like Redd Foxx anymore, which is reason enough to mourn the crusty comedian's death Friday evening from a heart attack at age 68.Mr. Foxx was one of those guys who told crude jokes in mixed company, spoke with a pronounced rasp and displayed a generally cantankerous attitude. He was, in other words, the last guy you would expect to become a television star in network prime time. But he did, and he was.The word "throwback" is a term so overused it has become rather trite.
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By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | July 9, 2007
Clarence "Shad" Brown Sr., a former bail bondsman, travel agent and fixture in the long-faded nightlife of Pennsylvania Avenue, died of an infection June 30 at Genesis Eldercare in Randallstown. He was 92. Born in Blackstone, Va., he moved to Baltimore with his parents and two brothers at a young age. He graduated from Frederick Douglass High School. He married Helen Francis in 1935, and the young family lived in the 300 block of Presstman St. for decades. Mr. Brown operated an after-hours club in the basement of his West Baltimore home that attracted many top entertainers when they were in town, said his son, Clarence Brown Jr. of Lochearn.
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By GREGORY KANE | August 16, 1997
Somewhere in the land is a college professor who has offered the opinion that Elvis Presley should be considered one of the major civil rights figures of the 20th century. That goes to show that no one is immune from making daffy remarks, not even college professors.Which is not to say that Elvis didn't have his impact. He plainly did. But I've always felt his relationship with black Americans was, at best, ambiguous.Years ago, when Pennsylvania Avenue was the cultural and economic hub of blacks in West Baltimore, Elvis' movies -- "Love Me Tender," "Jailhouse Rock," "King Creole" -- played to packed houses.
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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
As generations of patrons tell it, women in party dresses and men in suits would flock to the old Glen Burnie roadhouse to drink and dance. A guy named Slim parked patrons' cars, and a host ushered guests to crowded tables and booths. Waitresses served beer and rum cocktails with baskets of fried shrimp - a house specialty. Like black entertainment districts in Baltimore and Annapolis, Dotson's became a showcase, drawing top acts such as Dinah Washington and Redd Foxx in the 1950s and 1960s.
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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
As generations of patrons tell it, women in party dresses and men in suits would flock to the old Glen Burnie roadhouse to drink and dance. A guy named Slim parked patrons' cars, and a host ushered guests to crowded tables and booths. Waitresses served beer and rum cocktails with baskets of fried shrimp - a house specialty. Like black entertainment districts in Baltimore and Annapolis, Dotson's became a showcase, drawing top acts such as Dinah Washington and Redd Foxx in the 1950s and 1960s.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1991
Sharon Gless and Carol Burnett rose yesterday from the ashes of spring pre-emption and outright cancellation, respectively, to find new life on CBS for next fall. "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which disappeared from the CBS schedule this spring, was picked up for the fall. "Carol & Company," which was canceled Monday by NBC, will be reborn on CBS as "The Carol Burnett Show."Other shows renewed from last year were "Northern Exposure," "Evening Shade" and "Top Cops." They'll be joined next fall by new shows starring Redd Foxx, Della Reese and Connie Sellecca.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 18, 1991
THE INTO-the-past orientation of this new TV season continues tonight as Redd Foxx shows up in the rearview mirror.This is not some new, improved Redd Foxx. This is not a sudden discovery of overlooked dramatic talent hidden by years of stereotyped comedy.No, this is the same old Redd Foxx, actually a bit older. If you liked him in "Sanford & Son," you'll probably like him in "Royal Family," his new CBS comedy that premieres tonight at 8 o'clock on Channel 11 (WBAL).He's still gruff and rough and full of bile, this time spouting all sorts of allegedly humorous euphemisms for the bad words he wants to use.The reason he can't use them is not only that he's on television, but also that he's in an 8 o'clock time period.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | July 9, 2007
Clarence "Shad" Brown Sr., a former bail bondsman, travel agent and fixture in the long-faded nightlife of Pennsylvania Avenue, died of an infection June 30 at Genesis Eldercare in Randallstown. He was 92. Born in Blackstone, Va., he moved to Baltimore with his parents and two brothers at a young age. He graduated from Frederick Douglass High School. He married Helen Francis in 1935, and the young family lived in the 300 block of Presstman St. for decades. Mr. Brown operated an after-hours club in the basement of his West Baltimore home that attracted many top entertainers when they were in town, said his son, Clarence Brown Jr. of Lochearn.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
James S. Bierer: An obituary published yesterday incorrectly reported that James Shadel Bierer was survived by his wife, the former Cornelia Warner Rutledge, who died in 1993. The Sun regrets the error.John Owens sang as he flipped burgers as a short-order cook, sang while he chauffeured passengers in his cab and sang while he swept alleys and cleaned vacant lots as a sanitation worker.And he didn't just sing or hum to himself -- he sang loud and strong so all could hear."Not a day went by when Mo wasn't singing," said Rodney McNeil, a longtime friend and former neighbor of Mr. Owens' in the Rosemont community of West Baltimore.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
LaWanda Page, 81, a comedic character actress best known for her role as the Bible-thumping Aunt Esther in the 1970s television hit Sanford and Son, died Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from diabetes. Born in Cleveland and raised in St. Louis, Ms. Page began her career as a dancer and chorus girl billed as "the Bronze Goddess of Fire." She soon became adept at stand-up comedy. But her greatest fame began in her 50s, when childhood friend Redd Foxx asked her to join his Norman Lear sitcom adapted from the British series Steptoe and Son. She signed on as Fred Sanford's crusty sister-in-law, Esther Anderson, in 1973, and stayed until the series ended with Mr. Foxx's departure in 1977.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
James S. Bierer: An obituary published yesterday incorrectly reported that James Shadel Bierer was survived by his wife, the former Cornelia Warner Rutledge, who died in 1993. The Sun regrets the error.John Owens sang as he flipped burgers as a short-order cook, sang while he chauffeured passengers in his cab and sang while he swept alleys and cleaned vacant lots as a sanitation worker.And he didn't just sing or hum to himself -- he sang loud and strong so all could hear."Not a day went by when Mo wasn't singing," said Rodney McNeil, a longtime friend and former neighbor of Mr. Owens' in the Rosemont community of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 16, 1997
Somewhere in the land is a college professor who has offered the opinion that Elvis Presley should be considered one of the major civil rights figures of the 20th century. That goes to show that no one is immune from making daffy remarks, not even college professors.Which is not to say that Elvis didn't have his impact. He plainly did. But I've always felt his relationship with black Americans was, at best, ambiguous.Years ago, when Pennsylvania Avenue was the cultural and economic hub of blacks in West Baltimore, Elvis' movies -- "Love Me Tender," "Jailhouse Rock," "King Creole" -- played to packed houses.
FEATURES
By Ray Richmond and Ray Richmond,Orange County Register | October 14, 1991
They don't make 'em like Redd Foxx anymore, which is reason enough to mourn the crusty comedian's death Friday evening from a heart attack at age 68.Mr. Foxx was one of those guys who told crude jokes in mixed company, spoke with a pronounced rasp and displayed a generally cantankerous attitude. He was, in other words, the last guy you would expect to become a television star in network prime time. But he did, and he was.The word "throwback" is a term so overused it has become rather trite.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 18, 1991
THE INTO-the-past orientation of this new TV season continues tonight as Redd Foxx shows up in the rearview mirror.This is not some new, improved Redd Foxx. This is not a sudden discovery of overlooked dramatic talent hidden by years of stereotyped comedy.No, this is the same old Redd Foxx, actually a bit older. If you liked him in "Sanford & Son," you'll probably like him in "Royal Family," his new CBS comedy that premieres tonight at 8 o'clock on Channel 11 (WBAL).He's still gruff and rough and full of bile, this time spouting all sorts of allegedly humorous euphemisms for the bad words he wants to use.The reason he can't use them is not only that he's on television, but also that he's in an 8 o'clock time period.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1991
Sharon Gless and Carol Burnett rose yesterday from the ashes of spring pre-emption and outright cancellation, respectively, to find new life on CBS for next fall. "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which disappeared from the CBS schedule this spring, was picked up for the fall. "Carol & Company," which was canceled Monday by NBC, will be reborn on CBS as "The Carol Burnett Show."Other shows renewed from last year were "Northern Exposure," "Evening Shade" and "Top Cops." They'll be joined next fall by new shows starring Redd Foxx, Della Reese and Connie Sellecca.
NEWS
March 16, 2004
Julia M. Jackson, a former exotic dancer known as Kitty Dean, died of cancer Thursday at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 72. She was born Julia Magnolia Savage in Baltimore and raised in the Mount Winans neighborhood. She spent most of her childhood there and attended Baltimore public schools. Mrs. Jackson began dancing in the 1940s and retired in the 1960s. In her entertainer persona as Kitty Dean, her photograph ran in The Sun in 1992 with comedian Redd Foxx at the Sphinx Club.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 18, 1991
CBS has paired "The Royal Family" with another sitcom starring a black performer. While the veteran Redd Foxx might have the clout put over a family sitcom, young Phill Lewis can't do much with "Teech," another high-school comedy premiering tonight at 8:30 (Channel 11).This time, the school is an exclusive boarding school, so music teacher "Teech" Gibson (Lewis) has to endure watermelon jokes and being mistaken for the electrician. Teech asks his class, "Does anyone know what I'm doing here?"
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