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By Los Angeles Times | November 8, 1993
MOSCOW -- Thousands of heavily armed riot policemen blocked an attempt yesterday by Russian Communists to celebrate their most sacred holiday, Revolution Day, in the streets of Moscow.Turned away from Red Square and other rallying points with little coercion and few arrests, about 500 Communists withdrew to a snow-blanketed birch forest just north of the city for their party's smallest gathering here on this date since the event it commemorated -- the Bolshevik overthrow of Russia's post-czarist government in 1917.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | January 25, 2007
Red Square Restaurant and Lounge is the real Russian experience. With its semi-tacky decor, weird vodka shots and performers singing stale pop songs, this restaurant and bar in the Belvedere's basement is exactly what I imagine a Moscow club looks like. A decorative fountain with no running water sits by the entrance. The main dining room and bar area is pretty large, with a dance floor and a small stage. Most of the walls are unsurprisingly done in red hues, and a panoramic photo of Red Square is above the bar. To top it off, a huge vodka bottle shaped like an assault rifle hangs on the wall behind the bar. Another one shaped like a sword sits on a ledge above it. As if the atmosphere were not bewildering enough, one of the singers started off the live performance by saying something like: "Welcome to Red Square -- the only Russian restaurant in Baltimore County!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | January 25, 2007
Red Square Restaurant and Lounge is the real Russian experience. With its semi-tacky decor, weird vodka shots and performers singing stale pop songs, this restaurant and bar in the Belvedere's basement is exactly what I imagine a Moscow club looks like. A decorative fountain with no running water sits by the entrance. The main dining room and bar area is pretty large, with a dance floor and a small stage. Most of the walls are unsurprisingly done in red hues, and a panoramic photo of Red Square is above the bar. To top it off, a huge vodka bottle shaped like an assault rifle hangs on the wall behind the bar. Another one shaped like a sword sits on a ledge above it. As if the atmosphere were not bewildering enough, one of the singers started off the live performance by saying something like: "Welcome to Red Square -- the only Russian restaurant in Baltimore County!"
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2006
MOSCOW -- Nikita Muchnik, a student who sells cell phones at a department store near the Kremlin, doesn't much care whether the embalmed body of Vladimir I. Lenin stays in its airtight glass coffin in Red Square or is banished from its place of honor. In his mind, the Soviet founder has sunk to the level of a cynically exploited tourist attraction, a kind of real-life Madame Tussaud wax figure. "I don't think it's a particularly good thing that he's lying where he is, and I don't find it particularly pleasant to walk past there," said Muchnik, 18. "But those people who were affected by communism feel strongly about it. ... He's good for tourists.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 10, 2003
MOSCOW - Its churches have been restored, its 112-year-old shopping mall refurbished, its grand brick gate rebuilt. Lenin rests, freshly renovated, in his polished granite digs. Red Square, the space around which the rest of Russia turns, has probably never been more polished or surrounded by more prosperity. But seldom, in the sweet heat of August, has it been more deserted. Moscow authorities quietly closed the square to most visitors July 11, and officials have variously claimed that the area has been closed for invisible "restoration" work, or because chemicals were sprayed to kill weeds.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2006
MOSCOW -- Nikita Muchnik, a student who sells cell phones at a department store near the Kremlin, doesn't much care whether the embalmed body of Vladimir I. Lenin stays in its airtight glass coffin in Red Square or is banished from its place of honor. In his mind, the Soviet founder has sunk to the level of a cynically exploited tourist attraction, a kind of real-life Madame Tussaud wax figure. "I don't think it's a particularly good thing that he's lying where he is, and I don't find it particularly pleasant to walk past there," said Muchnik, 18. "But those people who were affected by communism feel strongly about it. ... He's good for tourists.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 5, 1993
Guide for Americans: In Tiananmen Square, the people were the good guys and the soldiers were the bad 'uns. In Red Square, is other way round.The most important issue is not who controls Moscow, but whether Moscow controls Russia and the nukes.How come the longer this recovery goes on, the more Americans get poor?
NEWS
June 19, 1997
SIX YEARS after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin wants to get rid of the icons of communism by removing the embalmed body of Vladimir I. Lenin from its Red Square mausoleum and reburying the ashes of hundreds of other communist heroes interred behind the granite stones of the Kremlin wall.Among the latter are three Americans: John Reed, a journalist who witnessed the 1917 revolution and wrote "Ten Days That Shook the World"; William "Big Bill" Haywood, a radical organizer who fled to Moscow to escape treason charges, and Charles Ruthenberg, one of the founders of the U.S. Communist Party.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | May 2, 1992
MOSCOW -- The celebrators of workers' power who once streamed through Red Square in endless, banner-carrying lines on May Day returned yesterday in bitterness and small numbers.Too much has happened since last May 1. The march toward a workers' paradise has been halted. The nation has disintegrated. The once glorified Communist Party was disgraced.And yesterday the final indignity was reported. Viktor Tolmachev, worker, pensioner and courageous defender of the Motherland, marched to Red Square to praise the Communist cause.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | May 10, 1993
MOSCOW -- Maria Lapina knew that yesterday's big march of Communists and nationalists down Tverskaya Street was supposed to turn into an even bloodier clash with the police than the one on May 1, so she came prepared.With two bright scarves, the diminutive Mrs. Lapina, a retiree who lives on a pension of about $4 a month, had strapped a dented steel soup pot onto her head."I intend to be ready," she said. "But I'm not afraid -- because I'm going to die soon anyway."She squinted from beneath the rim of the pot into the brilliant sunshine.
NEWS
May 10, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH is hitting all the right notes on Russia. It's a welcome change from his first term. He was right to go to Moscow to attend the V-E Day events yesterday - despite the creepy Stalinization under way there and the refusal of the Russians to recognize the harm they brought to Eastern Europe in the wake of World War II. He was also right to visit Latvia and Georgia - despite the Russian accusations that the United States is meddling too much...
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 10, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - The demonstrators who packed Independence Square here night after night rooted for more than just the capitulation of Ukraine's government. More quietly, many said they hoped that similar mass protests would one day fill Moscow's Red Square. "Sooner or later the Russian people will understand that they also have the right to be independent," said dentist Yuri Lvov, 54, as he stood with his daughter and thousands of others outside parliament. "And what is happening in Ukraine might happen in Russia."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
Detroit last week. Baltimore this week. Next month, the world. Elvira Kolpakova is gradually conquering her little corner of the road-racing circuit. In November, the 30-year-old Russian will travel to Taiwan and seek a world championship at 100 kilometers -- 62 miles. Just 10 days ago, she won a marathon in Detroit, and Saturday she will attempt to make history in the third Baltimore Running Festival. Kolpakova won here in 2001, when everyone else complained about a course that climbed into the north side.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 10, 2003
MOSCOW - Its churches have been restored, its 112-year-old shopping mall refurbished, its grand brick gate rebuilt. Lenin rests, freshly renovated, in his polished granite digs. Red Square, the space around which the rest of Russia turns, has probably never been more polished or surrounded by more prosperity. But seldom, in the sweet heat of August, has it been more deserted. Moscow authorities quietly closed the square to most visitors July 11, and officials have variously claimed that the area has been closed for invisible "restoration" work, or because chemicals were sprayed to kill weeds.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 2001
MOSCOW - For its ferocious critics, Russia's first reality TV show was evidence of rampant cultural rot. For its millions of fans, Behind the Glass was a mesmerizing glimpse into the conflicted lives and healthy libidos of modern Russian youth. But when it ended Saturday night near Red Square amid cheers and tears and fireworks, two questions remained: Would the winners find happiness together with their first prize, a year rent-free in a luxury Moscow apartment? And would Russia ever be the same?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 10, 1998
Sculptor Paul Wallach creates abstract wood and plaster sculptures that lead two lives in his show at the C. Grimaldis Gallery. They function as pure form, interacting with the room they're in, but they also politely possess more implications than they first appear to.They are still waters that run deep, and one has to give them time to reveal what lies in wait behind the first impression. Good manners are part of their essence. They nestle in corners or sit quietly on walls, declining aggressiveness in favor of allowing the viewer to discover them little by little.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 10, 1998
Sculptor Paul Wallach creates abstract wood and plaster sculptures that lead two lives in his show at the C. Grimaldis Gallery. They function as pure form, interacting with the room they're in, but they also politely possess more implications than they first appear to.They are still waters that run deep, and one has to give them time to reveal what lies in wait behind the first impression. Good manners are part of their essence. They nestle in corners or sit quietly on walls, declining aggressiveness in favor of allowing the viewer to discover them little by little.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1995
MOSCOW -- For a brief, bright moment yesterday, this nation battered by self-doubt and reversed fortunes walked with purpose, confidence and even pride.Russians celebrated and sorrowed over what many of them remember as the single greatest moment of their history -- May 9, 1945, when Germany admitted defeat in World War II.The anniversary began solemnly and emotionally at Red Square. There, 4,000 elderly veterans marched, sometimes feebly but with enormous determination, behind the red standards that they followed through the wartime years and through staggering losses.
NEWS
June 19, 1997
SIX YEARS after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin wants to get rid of the icons of communism by removing the embalmed body of Vladimir I. Lenin from its Red Square mausoleum and reburying the ashes of hundreds of other communist heroes interred behind the granite stones of the Kremlin wall.Among the latter are three Americans: John Reed, a journalist who witnessed the 1917 revolution and wrote "Ten Days That Shook the World"; William "Big Bill" Haywood, a radical organizer who fled to Moscow to escape treason charges, and Charles Ruthenberg, one of the founders of the U.S. Communist Party.
NEWS
By Susan Sachs and Susan Sachs,NEWSDAY | April 19, 1997
MOSCOW -- After 73 years of being injected with chemicals, bathed in artificial light and ogled by millions, it shouldn't come as a surprise: The corpse of Lenin returned from its annual touch-up this month with a bandage on the right thumb.That evidence of physical atrophy is not the only insult to the father of the Soviet state, whose mummified remains and copper-colored mausoleum on Red Square are once again at the center of a battle over symbols and memory.Six years after dismantling the Communist system and embarking on the road to capitalism, Russia remains a nation in search of consensus over where it is headed and what it should become.
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