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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1993
Every so often you experience a meal in a restaurant that merits mimicking. If only home cooks had the same advantages as the professionals' prep cooks and equipment. Given our domestic limitations, I am enthusiastic about the following efficient creation that surpasses most professional efforts I have consumed in the past year.This dish has three levels and each is a snap. First, red snapper fillets are coated with crunchy ground corn cereal crumbs and then baked quickly along with the interesting garnish which are piles of very thin baked strands of corn tortillas.
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NEWS
July 17, 2006
Ten years after Congress required that 67 species of depleted fish stocks be rebuilt to healthy levels, only three of them have been. The law had no effective means of enforcement, so many of the vanishing species continue to be overfished. Regional management councils have been loath to impose curbs that would hurt local fishermen, particularly in New England, even at the cost of ultimately putting them all out of business, according to a recent University of New Hampshire study. Five years later than scheduled, Congress may be finally on the verge of fixing the problem.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Remember that red snapper you picked up for dinner last week? It was probably a red herring. A provocative new genetic study by scientists at the University of North Carolina has found that most supermarket fillets sold as red snapper - one of America's priciest and most popular fish - are actually some other species. The findings, published today in the journal Nature, might come as a shock to fish lovers. But not to government officials and industry veterans, who say that confusing names and "species substitution" - illegally passing off a cheap fish as a more expensive one - are as old as the industry itself.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2005
It's 4:30 a.m., and the Maryland Wholesale Seafood Market in Jessup is awash in activity. A hundred miles from the Atlantic Ocean, the smell of saltwater fills the air. Mounds of fresh fish - salmon, tuna, glistening red snapper - lie on beds of ice in the chill, dimly lit warehouse. Soft-shell crabs, hauled from the Chesapeake Bay hours before, wriggle in wooden boxes lined with newspaper. Amid the din of forklifts and hand trucks, warehouse workers in orange rubber suits patrol the loading docks, handling tons of fresh catch bound for seafood markets and restaurants throughout the Mid-Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
There is only one way to properly interview Lisa Simeone: wine and dine her. "Food and wine. Absolutely. No question about it. Big-time. Somebody who doesn't appreciate food and wine, I'm sorry, I don't care how great a personality, sorry. There's nothing we have in common if you can't appreciate a good meal." Which brings us to Sotto Sopra, where Simeone is assured her car won't be towed outside on Charles Street and, sorry, they are fresh out of the rockfish but try the broiled red snapper in a lemon-caper dressing.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2005
It's 4:30 a.m., and the Maryland Wholesale Seafood Market in Jessup is awash in activity. A hundred miles from the Atlantic Ocean, the smell of saltwater fills the air. Mounds of fresh fish - salmon, tuna, glistening red snapper - lie on beds of ice in the chill, dimly lit warehouse. Soft-shell crabs, hauled from the Chesapeake Bay hours before, wriggle in wooden boxes lined with newspaper. Amid the din of forklifts and hand trucks, warehouse workers in orange rubber suits patrol the loading docks, handling tons of fresh catch bound for seafood markets and restaurants throughout the Mid-Atlantic.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 1996
Mixed wild mushrooms and brandy make an elegantly simple accompaniment for a delicate white fish such as red snapper, orange roughy or even farm-raised catfish. While fresh mushrooms are wonderful, you can get the same earthy flavor and save money if you use dried mushrooms and rehydrate them.Roast vegetables in the oven while the fish is being prepared on the stove. Heat oven to 450 degrees and cut potatoes, eggplant and tomatoes into 1 1/2 -inch cubes. Douse with olive oil and salt. Roast the potatoes for 5 minutes, then add the eggplant and bake potatoes and eggplant together for 5 minutes, then add the tomatoes and roast a final 5 minutes.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 23, 2005
Tiny bites of sausage, shellfish and poultry are combined in this hearty stew, which blends delicious flavors remembered from my grandmother's creole repertoire. This dinner's regional accent depends on market availability. Add fresh fish fillets and serve with French bread, and the pendulum swings toward creole dining. Leave out the red snapper and serve with wheat rolls, and the meal takes on a hint of cold-weather fare from the prairie. This time of year, when onions from the produce section tend to be harsh, I replace them with shallots or green onions to avoid the strong and sometimes bitter tones creeping into bulbs stored over the winter.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 16, 1995
You may have come to Baltimore for great basketball, but you don't want to leave without sampling our seafood.The first thing you need to know about eating out in Baltimore is that we're the crab cake capital of America, perhaps the universe. Don't leave town without trying one of these delicacies.Second, all our best restaurants have wonderful seafood -- even places with names such as the Prime Rib. Here are some nearby places to eat that capture the essence of Baltimore or, at the very least, offer a fine crab cake.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 19, 1997
Carrol's Creek has the potential to be that Holy Grail for visitors to a waterfront town, a great seafood restaurant.It's got all the ingredients, starting with a fine location right on the water. Every seat in the main dining room has a scenic view of Spa Creek. (Once known as Charles Carroll's creek, but spelled with one "l" on an 18th-century map. Hence the name.)The menu isn't long, but it has a good balance of local seafood dishes and more exotic ones. The fish is beautifully fresh, the kitchen's New American creations imaginative without crossing the line into strange.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 23, 2005
Tiny bites of sausage, shellfish and poultry are combined in this hearty stew, which blends delicious flavors remembered from my grandmother's creole repertoire. This dinner's regional accent depends on market availability. Add fresh fish fillets and serve with French bread, and the pendulum swings toward creole dining. Leave out the red snapper and serve with wheat rolls, and the meal takes on a hint of cold-weather fare from the prairie. This time of year, when onions from the produce section tend to be harsh, I replace them with shallots or green onions to avoid the strong and sometimes bitter tones creeping into bulbs stored over the winter.
TOPIC
July 18, 2004
The World A suicide attacker detonated a car bomb at a checkpoint near the British Embassy and the interim Iraqi government's headquarters in Baghdad, killing 11 people and wounding 40, including a U.S. soldier. It was the worst attack in the capital since the United States transferred sovereignty to the interim Iraqi government June 28. A day later, attackers detonated a car bomb near police and government buildings in the western city of Haditha, killing 10 Iraqis, while the prime minister said he would create a new security service geared toward halting the insurgency.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Remember that red snapper you picked up for dinner last week? It was probably a red herring. A provocative new genetic study by scientists at the University of North Carolina has found that most supermarket fillets sold as red snapper - one of America's priciest and most popular fish - are actually some other species. The findings, published today in the journal Nature, might come as a shock to fish lovers. But not to government officials and industry veterans, who say that confusing names and "species substitution" - illegally passing off a cheap fish as a more expensive one - are as old as the industry itself.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 28, 2003
Ah, yes, it's the end of the year and time for the annual "Things That Make You Go Hmmm" column. These are outdoors tidbits collected from colleagues and total strangers that make you realize that perhaps not all things alien stay at Area 51. Sure, recycling other people's stuff is cheap, but that's nothing compared to what I got friends and family for Christmas presents. Besides, recycling is environmentally correct. A ranger at Natchez Trace Parkway near Nashville, Tenn., stopped a station wagon on New Year's Day after he noticed a bullet hole in the driver's door and fresh blood on the bumper.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | July 6, 2002
Sadly, the Splendid Splinter has left us too soon. He's gone off to Ebbets Field, the Polo Grounds or some other version of baseball heaven where undoubtedly he'll get a warm welcome and probably some razzing too from such as the Flying Dutchman, the Georgia Peach and - without question - the Sultan of Swat himself. Probably, they'll greet The Kid with a pick-up game, a dream inter-generational All-Star Game. Teddy Ballgame might find himself playing left field behind the Rajah, the man he regarded as the best hitter ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
There is only one way to properly interview Lisa Simeone: wine and dine her. "Food and wine. Absolutely. No question about it. Big-time. Somebody who doesn't appreciate food and wine, I'm sorry, I don't care how great a personality, sorry. There's nothing we have in common if you can't appreciate a good meal." Which brings us to Sotto Sopra, where Simeone is assured her car won't be towed outside on Charles Street and, sorry, they are fresh out of the rockfish but try the broiled red snapper in a lemon-caper dressing.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 6, 1994
Jumbo Seafood, Sudbrook Square, 48 E. Sudbrook Lane, Pikesville, (410) 602-1441. Open Tuesdays to Sundays for lunch and dinner. D, MC, V. No-smoking restaurant. Wheelchair-accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $3-$5.50; entrees, $4.95-$16.95. ***I found out about Jumbo Seafood by accident when someone at work said he had a funny story about it. He and his wife, when they were told they were being taken to a place called Jumbo Seafood for their anniversary, had planned to order crab imperial and a nice piece of red snapper with a cream sauce.
NEWS
July 17, 2006
Ten years after Congress required that 67 species of depleted fish stocks be rebuilt to healthy levels, only three of them have been. The law had no effective means of enforcement, so many of the vanishing species continue to be overfished. Regional management councils have been loath to impose curbs that would hurt local fishermen, particularly in New England, even at the cost of ultimately putting them all out of business, according to a recent University of New Hampshire study. Five years later than scheduled, Congress may be finally on the verge of fixing the problem.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 13, 2001
Whenever people ask me about trendy Greek seafood restaurants in Fells Point, I always remind them not to forget Opa!, the eldest of a group that includes the Black Olive, Kali's Court and Karabelas. Opa! was formerly the Taverna Athena in Harborplace. When it moved to Aliceanna Street five years ago and got its new name, it was essentially the same restaurant. The concept -- traditional Greek food served in a pretty setting -- had worked well in the Inner Harbor. Nowadays, given the success of the places that followed it, Opa!
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
As the crab and boating season gets into full gear, waterfront restaurants in South County are braced for the summer rush. One of these, Skipper's Pier in Deale, boasts local crabs and an excellent waterfront view. The restaurant isn't blessed with the best location to find by land, but its deck, opening onto Rockhold Creek, gives it an authentic bayside atmosphere. At the end of the long and winding Drum Point Road, Skipper's Pier offers a good selection of seafood and relaxed atmosphere.
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