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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Boston--Supported by a cane and escorted by two publicists in spike heels and spangly mini-suits, Red Skelton limps into the lobby of the Wang Center for the Performing Arts, a vintage Boston movie palace restored to authentic grandeur. More than half a century ago, Mr. Skelton played this theater on the vaudeville circuit, no doubt treating his audience to the spectacular pratfalls that have hobbled him today.Call: (410) 783-8000 or (410) 481-SEAT to charge by phone.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
It didn't take much, maybe a wave of the hand, a thumbs-up sign, or a simple laugh. Just some indication the guy sitting behind the desk liked you, that was all a struggling young comic needed. When Johnny Carson died yesterday at age 79, comedians all over America lost the best promoter they ever had. By all accounts, Carson loved nothing more than showcasing new talent. "Bill Cosby started on his show, George Carlin started on his show. I started on it, and David Brenner," Joan Rivers, a favorite of Carson's until she started her own show, told CNN yesterday.
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By Andrew Ratner | September 21, 1997
WHEN RED SKELTON died the other day at age 84, baby boomers did something they loathe: They felt their age.Skelton's act, of course, traced back much farther than the boomers, the oldest of whom turned 50 last year. The slapstick comedian and pantomimist played burlesque houses in the 1920s, vaudeville and radio in the '30s and starred in a couple dozen films, mostly after World War II, just as the boomers were being born. But he was best known for his long-running variety show on network television.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2005
Michael D. Pangalis Jr., who abandoned his dream of becoming a professional clown and became the owner of a popular Essex crab house, died of cancer Thursday at his Middle River home. He was 70. He was born Michael Botsaris in Farrell, Pa., and after the death of his father moved with his family to Quantico, Va. When his mother remarried, he was adopted by his stepfather and given his name. In 1945, the elder Pangalis sold his successful restaurant in Quantico and moved to Essex, where he opened A-1 Cocktail Lounge at Josenhans Corner, Old Eastern Avenue and Stemmers Run Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2004
"My plan as a little boy was to try to be a movie comedy actor like a Bob Hope or a Danny Kaye or a Red Skelton." -- Comedian George Carlin
NEWS
September 24, 1997
Mayor deserves praise for not spending moneyAlthough I grew up liberal-thinking in Northwest Baltimore, I have always been conservative on financial matters. My friends could not understand how I could consistently vote against almost every loan or bond issue on the ballot.I am uncomfortable spending money we don't have, relying on a future generation to pay off our notes. Politicans who regularly voted our deficits into the stratosphere criticize Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke for waiting until the tax revenue check clears, as it were, before spending the money.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 20, 1990
On The Weekend Watch:CARTOON CRUSADE -- How's this for timing? McCall's magazine this week sent TV writers a press release in advance of a January article in which child psychologist Lee Salk cites such programs as "The Simpsons" and "Roseanne" for having a negative influence on children. And in tonight's scheduled episode of "The Simpsons" (at 8, Channel 45), mother Marge takes up a community crusade against violence in TV cartoons.ANOTHER DREAM? -- In the 1965-70 series "I Dream of Jeannie," Barbara Eden was the genie who sprang from a bottle to serve her astronaut master, played by Larry Hagman.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
It didn't take much, maybe a wave of the hand, a thumbs-up sign, or a simple laugh. Just some indication the guy sitting behind the desk liked you, that was all a struggling young comic needed. When Johnny Carson died yesterday at age 79, comedians all over America lost the best promoter they ever had. By all accounts, Carson loved nothing more than showcasing new talent. "Bill Cosby started on his show, George Carlin started on his show. I started on it, and David Brenner," Joan Rivers, a favorite of Carson's until she started her own show, told CNN yesterday.
NEWS
By Stephen Budiansky | May 12, 2004
THE EXAMPLE of Pat Tillman, who turned down a $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist as an Army private and who died last month fighting in Afghanistan, is more than a story of one man's exceptional sacrifice: It is a story of one nation's loss of its moral compass. In World War II, the historian (and ex-Marine) William Manchester recalled, "everybody who was fit went." Sports heroes went - Joe DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg, Joe Louis. Entertainers and movie stars went - Red Skelton, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Henry Fonda, Jimmy Stewart, Clark Gable, Glenn Miller.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2005
Michael D. Pangalis Jr., who abandoned his dream of becoming a professional clown and became the owner of a popular Essex crab house, died of cancer Thursday at his Middle River home. He was 70. He was born Michael Botsaris in Farrell, Pa., and after the death of his father moved with his family to Quantico, Va. When his mother remarried, he was adopted by his stepfather and given his name. In 1945, the elder Pangalis sold his successful restaurant in Quantico and moved to Essex, where he opened A-1 Cocktail Lounge at Josenhans Corner, Old Eastern Avenue and Stemmers Run Road.
NEWS
By Stephen Budiansky | May 12, 2004
THE EXAMPLE of Pat Tillman, who turned down a $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist as an Army private and who died last month fighting in Afghanistan, is more than a story of one man's exceptional sacrifice: It is a story of one nation's loss of its moral compass. In World War II, the historian (and ex-Marine) William Manchester recalled, "everybody who was fit went." Sports heroes went - Joe DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg, Joe Louis. Entertainers and movie stars went - Red Skelton, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Henry Fonda, Jimmy Stewart, Clark Gable, Glenn Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2004
"My plan as a little boy was to try to be a movie comedy actor like a Bob Hope or a Danny Kaye or a Red Skelton." -- Comedian George Carlin
NEWS
September 24, 1997
Mayor deserves praise for not spending moneyAlthough I grew up liberal-thinking in Northwest Baltimore, I have always been conservative on financial matters. My friends could not understand how I could consistently vote against almost every loan or bond issue on the ballot.I am uncomfortable spending money we don't have, relying on a future generation to pay off our notes. Politicans who regularly voted our deficits into the stratosphere criticize Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke for waiting until the tax revenue check clears, as it were, before spending the money.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | September 21, 1997
WHEN RED SKELTON died the other day at age 84, baby boomers did something they loathe: They felt their age.Skelton's act, of course, traced back much farther than the boomers, the oldest of whom turned 50 last year. The slapstick comedian and pantomimist played burlesque houses in the 1920s, vaudeville and radio in the '30s and starred in a couple dozen films, mostly after World War II, just as the boomers were being born. But he was best known for his long-running variety show on network television.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Boston--Supported by a cane and escorted by two publicists in spike heels and spangly mini-suits, Red Skelton limps into the lobby of the Wang Center for the Performing Arts, a vintage Boston movie palace restored to authentic grandeur. More than half a century ago, Mr. Skelton played this theater on the vaudeville circuit, no doubt treating his audience to the spectacular pratfalls that have hobbled him today.Call: (410) 783-8000 or (410) 481-SEAT to charge by phone.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 20, 1990
On The Weekend Watch:CARTOON CRUSADE -- How's this for timing? McCall's magazine this week sent TV writers a press release in advance of a January article in which child psychologist Lee Salk cites such programs as "The Simpsons" and "Roseanne" for having a negative influence on children. And in tonight's scheduled episode of "The Simpsons" (at 8, Channel 45), mother Marge takes up a community crusade against violence in TV cartoons.ANOTHER DREAM? -- In the 1965-70 series "I Dream of Jeannie," Barbara Eden was the genie who sprang from a bottle to serve her astronaut master, played by Larry Hagman.
NEWS
September 16, 1999
Harry Crane, 85, co-creator of Jackie Gleason's classic 1950s sitcom "The Honeymooners" and comedy writer for Red Skelton, the Marx Brothers, Bing Crosby and others, died in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Tuesday of cancer.
NEWS
May 25, 1998
Royce Kendall, 61, of the father-daughter country music duo the Kendalls, died Friday after collapsing at a concert site in Iowa. He and daughter Jeannie Kendall had several hits, including "Heaven's Just a Sin Away," "Thank God for the Radio" and "Sweet Desire."Robert W. Morgan, 60, a fixture on KRTH-FM and other Los Angeles radio stations for more than three decades, died Friday after a two-year battle with lung cancer.Ricardo Franco, 48, a director whose film "The Good Star" swept Spain's Goya Film Awards in January, died of a heart attack Thursday in Madrid.
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