Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRed Riding Hood
IN THE NEWS

Red Riding Hood

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1994
Instead of going through the woods to Grandma's house, Little Red Riding Hood is coming to Westminster tomorrow as The Parker Playhouse of Ocean City presents its annual production at 2 p.m. at Westminster High School.For 14 years, the mayor and council of Ocean City have allocated money for The Parker Playhouse to perform family shows around the state as a way of saying "thank you" for making the town a successful family resort.The 1994 show is the musical "Red Riding Hood," which begins with the little girl being sent to her sick grandmother's with a basket of goodies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2009
Rainbow Theatre at Slayton House in the Wilde Lake Village Green will continue its series of performances for children with a musical Little Red Riding Hood at 10 a.m. Friday. Carousel Puppets will dramatize the story with hand and rod puppets. Tickets are $5 in advance and $6 at the door, if available. Group rates are available. The series is sponsored by the Wilde Lake Community Association. Information: 410-730-3987. Natural balance Local naturopathic physician Dr. Julie Kniess will discuss "How to Balance Female Hormones ... Naturally" from 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Thursday at Slayton House.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 15, 2009
Rainbow Theatre at Slayton House in the Wilde Lake Village Green will continue its series of performances for children with a musical Little Red Riding Hood at 10 a.m. Friday. Carousel Puppets will dramatize the story with hand and rod puppets. Tickets are $5 in advance and $6 at the door, if available. Group rates are available. The series is sponsored by the Wilde Lake Community Association. Information: 410-730-3987. Natural balance Local naturopathic physician Dr. Julie Kniess will discuss "How to Balance Female Hormones ... Naturally" from 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Thursday at Slayton House.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
At Linton Springs Elementary School, students rolled out the red carpet for a bunch of storybook characters. Snow White and Cinderella, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Little Red Riding Hood and, of course, her grandmother, made appearances, smiling and camera-ready. The fairy-tale legends arrived at the 2007 Granny Awards - named for the Little Red Riding Hood character impersonated by the infamous Wolf - to sing, dance, and, of course, take home one of those coveted gold statues. The ceremony, presented by the South Carroll school's fourth- and fifth-grade chorus Wednesday, served as their spring music program.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
"Freeway" is a retelling of the old Little Red Riding Hood tale, but it seems to draw more on Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs than Perrault's French original."Hey, there, Little Red Riding Hood/You sure are looking good" would appear to be the reigning aesthetic as Red shimmies across the Valley in tarty teen clothes that show more than they should. The film reinvents the story in the sleazy suburbs of L.A. and peoples it with archetypes not of 16th century nursery tales but of Jim Thompson novels.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES | February 11, 1996
I found a china bank in the shape of Little Red Riding Hood. A coin slot is in her basket. There are holes in the back of the figure so it can hang on a wall. It's marked "Pat. No. 135889." Was it made by Hull Pottery like other Little Red Riding Hood items? It must be valuable, because you have to break it to get the money. There must be very few left.The Hull Pottery Co. of Crooksville, Ohio, made Little Red Riding Hood items from the mid-1940s through the '50s. Pieces with the patent number you describe were made in the pottery and shipped to the Royal China and Novelty Co. of Chicago, where they were decorated.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
Lost in the Forest By Sue Miller The powerful but painful story of a teenage girl blackmailed into a relationship with a much older man. Miller creates an engrossing turn on the "Little Red Riding Hood" fairy tale. This is an examination of how parents may obliviously harm their children, and how those children may harm themselves by turning inward rather than reaching out for help, or by reaching out to the wrong people.
NEWS
By Tiffany Latimore | February 15, 1996
This ain't no story of celebrationYou see, where I've been and what I've seenLittle Red Riding Hood never got to her grandmom's houseThe big bad man kidnapped herGoldilocks never got back homeShe got caught in a crossfireLittle Bo Peep never found her sheepShe took drugs and diedYou see, in my neighborhoodIt ain't no fairytaleTiffany Latimore is an eighth-grade student at Old Court Middle School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander | May 9, 2002
They may be made of felt and fur and paper, but the Kaydee Puppets' rabbits, hedgehogs, wolves and little girl in a red riding hood will be the storytellers in a program Saturday at the White Marsh Branch Library, while puppeteers Dee and Chuck Cardiff stay behind the scenes, literally. The couple will work from behind a stage and use the hand puppets to involve the audience throughout the 30-minute event. "We stick mostly to fairy tales," says Dee, but they also update parts of the stories and throw in some current humor to keep it fun. The Kaydee Puppets will perform Little Red Riding Hood and Bunny Tales, including a story about Peter Rabbit and a hedgehog race and a story about how Peter outsmarted a fox and a wolf.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 8, 2005
`Children's Day' On Sunday, Ladew Topiary Gardens is all about kids. The 22-acre garden in Monkton is presenting its Children's Day. Kids can enjoy interactive musical performances, sing-alongs, crafts, rock-painting, face-painting, balloon sculptures and treats, including cotton candy. Kids can also take a walk through the flower and topiary gardens to spot the animal-shaped shrub sculptures. Children's Day is noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Ladew Topiary Gardens, 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [J. WYNN ROUSUCK] | January 18, 2007
`Into the Woods' The lowdown -- It's Into the Woods and "into the new theater" for Signature Theatre of Arlington, Va., which inaugurates its new, $16 million theater complex with a production of the 1987 Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical, opening tomorrow. Signature artistic director Eric Schaeffer directs this revisionist look at fairy tales and their consequences. The cast is headed by Eleasha Gamble as the Witch, April Harr Blandin as the Baker's Wife, Stephen Gregory Smith as Jack and Lauren Williams as Little Red Riding Hood.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
Lost in the Forest By Sue Miller The powerful but painful story of a teenage girl blackmailed into a relationship with a much older man. Miller creates an engrossing turn on the "Little Red Riding Hood" fairy tale. This is an examination of how parents may obliviously harm their children, and how those children may harm themselves by turning inward rather than reaching out for help, or by reaching out to the wrong people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 8, 2005
`Children's Day' On Sunday, Ladew Topiary Gardens is all about kids. The 22-acre garden in Monkton is presenting its Children's Day. Kids can enjoy interactive musical performances, sing-alongs, crafts, rock-painting, face-painting, balloon sculptures and treats, including cotton candy. Kids can also take a walk through the flower and topiary gardens to spot the animal-shaped shrub sculptures. Children's Day is noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Ladew Topiary Gardens, 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2004
I'm not sure there's a tougher musical to bring off these days than Into the Woods, Stephen Sondheim's bittersweet take on the not-so-happily-ever-after endings of the classic fairy tales we thought we knew. The score's rhythmic demands are relentless, and while Sondheim's spiky melodies are singable to a fault, they can be deucedly hard for performers to pull out of the air. Most difficult is the balance that must be struck between the ups of Act I and the downs of Act II, when Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red Riding Hood, Jack (of beanstalk fame)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2004
I'm not sure there's a tougher musical to bring off these days than Into the Woods, Stephen Sondheim's bittersweet take on the not-so-happily-ever-after endings of the classic fairy tales we thought we knew. The score's rhythmic demands are relentless, and while Sondheim's spiky melodies are singable to a fault, they can be deucedly hard for performers to pull out of the air. Most difficult is the balance that must be struck between the ups of Act I and the downs of Act II, when Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red Riding Hood, Jack (of beanstalk fame)
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2002
Move over, Prokofiev. There is no more popular piece to introduce children to the orchestra than your Peter and the Wolf, but now there is an alternative. Making its debut at the Meyerhoff yesterday was a new piece for children, Red Riding Hood, set to the famous childhood story. As its nervous composer, 27-year-old Brian Balmages, hung over a balcony box watching Baltimore Symphony Orchestra assistant conductor Lara Webber's every move, a house full of schoolchildren followed the antics of two mimes wearing granny glasses and carrying an ax. A solo clarinet represents Red Riding Hood in the 10-minute narrated piece.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop | February 16, 2000
"Cinderella," "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood" -- all classic tales with sound lessons of just deserts and possibilities, but also all tales of female characters waiting for someone else to pave the way -- for someone else to rescue them. If you have daughters, or sons, you might want to introduce them to a different kind of heroine -- the kind who does the rescuing. Kathleen Odean, a librarian and former member of the Caldecott and Newbery Award selection committees, has compiled a list of more than 600 titles into "Great Books for Girls" (Ballantine, 1997)
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 12, 1997
Typewriters are gradually being replaced by computers. Some collectors are now searching for old and rare examples that explain the history and evolution of the typewriter.The first successful production typewriter was made in 1874 by the E. Remington & Sons Co. of Ilion, N.Y. There had been more than 100 other writing machines invented by that time. Most of them were patented, and a few were sold in small numbers.Christopher Latham Sholes, Carlos Glidden and Samuel Soule made the machine in the 1860s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander | May 9, 2002
They may be made of felt and fur and paper, but the Kaydee Puppets' rabbits, hedgehogs, wolves and little girl in a red riding hood will be the storytellers in a program Saturday at the White Marsh Branch Library, while puppeteers Dee and Chuck Cardiff stay behind the scenes, literally. The couple will work from behind a stage and use the hand puppets to involve the audience throughout the 30-minute event. "We stick mostly to fairy tales," says Dee, but they also update parts of the stories and throw in some current humor to keep it fun. The Kaydee Puppets will perform Little Red Riding Hood and Bunny Tales, including a story about Peter Rabbit and a hedgehog race and a story about how Peter outsmarted a fox and a wolf.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | October 28, 2001
When Steven Spielberg calls, Hollywood answers, especially when it's for a good cause. So when the legendary movie director asked Gwyneth Paltrow, Whoopi Goldberg and nearly 20 other celebrities to re-write four classic children's stories, they said yes. The result, Once Upon a Fairy Tale (Viking, $30), is a quirky take on old favorites that is visually captivating, thanks to 21 renowned children's book illustrators -- and easy on the ears, thanks to a CD that comes with the book. Royalties from the project will go to the STARBRIGHT Foundation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.