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By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | October 11, 2006
This pasta of Italian flavors takes advantage of red peppers and fresh herbs still abundant in farmers' markets, or maybe in your garden if you've planted them. The recipe calls for fresh thyme and oregano, but many other herbs would substitute just as well. Think basil or marjoram. For dessert, sliced fresh peaches with a splash of liqueur (such as the Italian lemon-flavored limoncello) make a simple and refreshing ending. A simple biscotti alongside wouldn't hurt. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 12, 2013
The sandwich's simple format offers unlimited options for culinary creativity. At Woody's Hitching Post - deep in Monkton's pastoral horse country - chef-owner David "Woody" Woodruff is busy exploring those options - to the great benefit of his customers. Woodruff opened his eponymous shop last summer, leaving behind a career in commercial real estate (he had restaurant experience from his younger days). It's a simple spot - bare-bones decor, handwritten signs advertising the menu, a handful of tables and an open, diner-style kitchen - but that keeps the focus on the food and on Woodruff's friendly personality.
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EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Chef Rebecca Pauvert reflects: “I chose this recipe because it is one of my favorites. It has great flavors, it's comforting and it's a recipe that you can increase if you want and enjoy for a couple of nights. It only gets better.” Braised Chicken Basquaise with red peppers and artichokes Ingredients: •    olive oil •    ½ pound chorizo •    2 small red onions, cut in 6 wedges •    2 red peppers, cut in ½-inch strips •    4 Cornish game hens, halved •    4 plum tomatoes, quartered •    8 small artichoke hearts, halved •    6 cloves garlic •    2 cups chicken stock, plus •    Juice of 1 lemon •    ¾ cup sherry •    sea salt and ground black pepper Directions: 1. Heat oil in large braising pan. Brown chorizo slightly, add red onions and red peppers and toss a few times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 19, 2013
Paolo Romeo believes that food is art. The chef-owner of Artful Gourmet, which has been an Owings Mills mainstay for just over a decade, isn't wildly avant-garde in the kitchen. He doesn't take chances on creative dishes. But Romeo does take an artist's care with his capable interpretations of Italian food and global favorites. And the restaurant's adoption of the food-is-art theme adds charm to a menu stocked with familiar fare. His conservative approach, which focuses on well-worn classics like lamb chops and simple pastas, appears to be a hit with locals, who keep the restaurant busy.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Jeannette Yates of Annapolis wrote that she loved the recipe her mother made called Chow Chow. "This one was made in the microwave and had pearl onions, cauliflower, red peppers, green tomatoes and more. It was wonderful with pork or turkey. Hope someone has it and will send it to you for me." Marie Mezewski of Baltimore responded with a recipe for Chow Chow. "We call it relish, and the recipe is over 100 years old. It was my mother's, handed down from her mother. I am glad to share it with Jeannette Yates and other readers.
FEATURES
By Linda Susan Dudley and Linda Susan Dudley,Copley News Service | February 2, 1992
Red bell peppers are hot. Well, not hot actually. Not like fiery red chilies. Hot as in popular or trendy.In fact, the word pepper can be confusing. Sweet peppers -- also called bell peppers -- are botanically related to chilies yet are quite different in their usage.Sweet peppers can be used in large quantities in a dish such as in stuffed peppers. Paprika is made from dried sweet red peppers. Chilies, on the other hand, are prized for their hot, spicy qualities. The potent ground cayenne pepper is made from dried chilies.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff writer | April 1, 1992
This weekend is a real treat for cooking show junkies because two popular television chefs, Pierre Franey and Nathalie Dupree, introduce their new shows."
NEWS
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
Spring onions rarely get a chance to shine. They are always relegated to playing fourth or fifth fiddle. But the spring onion has much more to offer than being a bit player in a soup. From now until the end of the summer, farmers' markets all over Maryland will offer these pungent alliums in sizes ranging from pencil thin to baseball thick. They're a cheap and easy way to impress your friends and family at a cookout (using our recipe, natch). This recipe brings out our inner terrible cook because it encourages us to burn our food.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
The Complete Whole Grains Cookbook By Judith Finlayson Betty Crocker Whole Grains Easy Everyday Recipes Wiley Publishing / 2007 / $19.95 This is a practical book that would be particularly useful to a novice cook who's trying to eat better. Pluses include a user-friendly explanation of how to decipher information about grains on supermarket labels; nutritional information with each recipe; and a heading that tells you how many whole-grain servings are in a serving of each recipe. The Savory Millet and Potato Stew we tried made a quick, basic, one-pot meal that was very low in fat. kate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Since the Ravens are playing in Cincinnati this weekend, there won't be a proper chance to tailgate at M&T Bank Stadium. If you're planning on celebrating at home, one-pot recipes are often the best option: They don't take too much time to make and serve, and can satisfy a group of hungry fans. Enter the humble bowl of chili - a signature dish for many home cooks. This recipe has meat and beans, and a touch of spice - but not enough to cause much trouble. It's made in three stages: Brown the meat; cook the vegetables; and combine everything.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Chef Rebecca Pauvert reflects: “I chose this recipe because it is one of my favorites. It has great flavors, it's comforting and it's a recipe that you can increase if you want and enjoy for a couple of nights. It only gets better.” Braised Chicken Basquaise with red peppers and artichokes Ingredients: •    olive oil •    ½ pound chorizo •    2 small red onions, cut in 6 wedges •    2 red peppers, cut in ½-inch strips •    4 Cornish game hens, halved •    4 plum tomatoes, quartered •    8 small artichoke hearts, halved •    6 cloves garlic •    2 cups chicken stock, plus •    Juice of 1 lemon •    ¾ cup sherry •    sea salt and ground black pepper Directions: 1. Heat oil in large braising pan. Brown chorizo slightly, add red onions and red peppers and toss a few times.
NEWS
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
Spring onions rarely get a chance to shine. They are always relegated to playing fourth or fifth fiddle. But the spring onion has much more to offer than being a bit player in a soup. From now until the end of the summer, farmers' markets all over Maryland will offer these pungent alliums in sizes ranging from pencil thin to baseball thick. They're a cheap and easy way to impress your friends and family at a cookout (using our recipe, natch). This recipe brings out our inner terrible cook because it encourages us to burn our food.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | March 7, 2012
Although winter in these parts hasn't been a terrible hardship this year, it's still pleasant to anticipate more moderate temperatures when you can put away the winter Crocs and start looking for your sandals. And who can blame you if you jump the proverbial gun and invite friends in for a petite soiree with a springtime theme. To celebrate the onset of a purportedly milder season, we present this simple - emphasis on simple - seasonal dinner for eight. Begin with goat cheese triangles used as a "garnish" on a salad of spring greens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Since the Ravens are playing in Cincinnati this weekend, there won't be a proper chance to tailgate at M&T Bank Stadium. If you're planning on celebrating at home, one-pot recipes are often the best option: They don't take too much time to make and serve, and can satisfy a group of hungry fans. Enter the humble bowl of chili - a signature dish for many home cooks. This recipe has meat and beans, and a touch of spice - but not enough to cause much trouble. It's made in three stages: Brown the meat; cook the vegetables; and combine everything.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | December 12, 2011
Executive chef Joshua Vazquez reflects: Cooking is really a passion of mine and has been since my childhood. As a child, I grew up in Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is truly a wonderful place because of the cultural mix that stems from its history. Growing up there really influenced me not only as a person, but also as a cook. The rich history created a nexus of Indian, European and African influences and flavors that all still inspire me today. These rich flavors and cooking styles, Ceviche for example, always provide a base I can look back to whenever I am in doubt about a dish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
I do love looking at Restaurant Week menus. Some of them are so lame! Salt Tavern in Upper Fells Point has a good one. It looks freshly considered -- although, that's a given at Salt, where Jason Ambrose and company regularly overhauls the menu. Also, the RW menu at Salt has more than the usual number of choices but is still focused and manageable. What do you think about Salt's RW menu -- if you haven't been for a while, does it tempt you to go back. First Course (choice of one)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 7, 1999
This Shrimp and Scallop Gumbo is a variation on the ones I grew up eating during my childhood in the South. For my version, I used more vegetables than in traditional gumbos. Chopped onions and green peppers are staples, but I also added sweet red peppers, carrots and celery for extra flavor and texture. Also, instead of making this classic soup with a single shellfish, I combined shrimp and scallops.Although the recipe is for four portions, it can easily be doubled or tripled and would make a delicious entree for a buffet.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1993
To embellish a meal of romance on the day designed for love, consider this effortless menu masquerading as a culinary feat. Arty and appealing roulade rounds are a tasty use of vegetables with the always popular steak. The trick for instant tenderness is to have the butcher run the steak through his tenderizer machine and this takes only a minute. (Otherwise, your flank steak could well be stringy and tough.)Simple fresh steamed green beans add a bright touch as the vegetable and can be fanned out on the plate for an attractive presentation.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
The Complete Whole Grains Cookbook By Judith Finlayson Betty Crocker Whole Grains Easy Everyday Recipes Wiley Publishing / 2007 / $19.95 This is a practical book that would be particularly useful to a novice cook who's trying to eat better. Pluses include a user-friendly explanation of how to decipher information about grains on supermarket labels; nutritional information with each recipe; and a heading that tells you how many whole-grain servings are in a serving of each recipe. The Savory Millet and Potato Stew we tried made a quick, basic, one-pot meal that was very low in fat. kate.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | October 11, 2006
This pasta of Italian flavors takes advantage of red peppers and fresh herbs still abundant in farmers' markets, or maybe in your garden if you've planted them. The recipe calls for fresh thyme and oregano, but many other herbs would substitute just as well. Think basil or marjoram. For dessert, sliced fresh peaches with a splash of liqueur (such as the Italian lemon-flavored limoncello) make a simple and refreshing ending. A simple biscotti alongside wouldn't hurt. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
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