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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2002
Elaine Slupe of Winchester, Va., writes that she would like to find a recipe for corn salad "like the one served on the salad bar at Ruby Tuesday's Restaurant. It appears to have corn, tomatoes, onion, and red, green and yellow peppers, plus something that tastes like cilantro and perhaps some cumin. It is always delicious and fresh. If any of your readers have this recipe, I would be most grateful for it." Beth Edelstein of Timonium responded. She wrote: "I think I have the recipe for corn salad Elaine Slupe needed.
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NEWS
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
When I was 13 or 14, I got my first real job and it was a brutal one: picking cucumbers on the Zuzgo family's 40 Acre Farm in Hadley, Mass. I have no idea if picker technology has advanced since then, but in those days, a tractor pulled a wide, wheeled platform across the fields. The platform had mattresses on top and about a dozen teenagers — always teenagers — would lie on our stomachs, face forward as the tractor moved ahead slowly. A black tarp over the whole contraption protected us from the sun and also created a sauna-like environment.
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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2008
Chipotle-flavored bratwurst from the butcher shop takes center stage in this fall celebration of the grill. The spicy smokiness of the brats takes on an extra dimension when the links are grilled, especially if they are cooked over hardwood lump charcoal. I like to top the brats with chopped red bell pepper and red onion. I char the bell pepper right on the coals, then grill thick slices of red onion alongside the brats. It's your choice whether to serve it all in a bun. Round out the bratwurst with potato salad and coleslaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
This potato salad recipe bucks the usual drenched-in-mayo stereotype — and that's a good thing. It's vegan (and gluten-free), but don't let that steer you away. You can't beat the flavor, thanks to a dressing with a base of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, red onion, herbs and more. My husband's cousin Coco, who blogs at http://www.operagirlcooks.com , developed the recipe to be served warm, which is outstanding. But the few times we've had leftovers, we've enjoyed it chilled, too. The flavors intensify as it sits, so if you make it ahead for a tailgate party or other event and chill it overnight, it's just as good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
This potato salad recipe bucks the usual drenched-in-mayo stereotype — and that's a good thing. It's vegan (and gluten-free), but don't let that steer you away. You can't beat the flavor, thanks to a dressing with a base of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, red onion, herbs and more. My husband's cousin Coco, who blogs at http://www.operagirlcooks.com , developed the recipe to be served warm, which is outstanding. But the few times we've had leftovers, we've enjoyed it chilled, too. The flavors intensify as it sits, so if you make it ahead for a tailgate party or other event and chill it overnight, it's just as good.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | September 22, 1999
* Item: Heavens' Bistro 98 Percent Fat Free Pizzas* What you get: 3 servings per 15.5-ounce pizza* Cost: $5.40* Preparation time: 1 minute in microwave, then 10 to 12 minutes in oven for soft crust, 13 to 18 minutes for crisp crust* Review: Fat-free pizza might seem like an oxymoron, but Heavens' Bistro appears to be on to something. This is pizza you can enjoy without worrying too much about calories. We tried the Barbeque Chicken flavor with white meat chicken, red onion and cilantro as well as the Grilled Vegetable with red, yellow and green bell peppers, red onion and mushrooms.
NEWS
By Emily Nunn and Emily Nunn,Chicago Tribune | October 8, 2008
If you can find a brioche loaf for this simple sandwich, all the better, but it's dreamy on plain white toast, too. And it's so fast, it will make you feel spoiled. In fact, it's the kind of white-toast sandwich that ladies-who-lunch might order at the lunch counter at an upscale department store if ladies-who-lunch still ate white-toast sandwiches at upscale department store lunch counters in the year 2008. Maybe they do. If so, here's to the ladies-who-lunch. shrimp sandwiches with chile mayonnaise (makes 4 sandwiches)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 23, 2000
Some of the best Italian cuisine is found in trattorie -- small cafes, typically family-owned and operated, often with modest menus and unpretentious wine lists. Dinner in a trattoria might begin with an aperitif and antipasti, then a small first course of soup, pasta or risotto; a second course of fish, poultry or meat, with vegetables or salad served separately; followed perhaps by fresh fruit or cheese; and ending with espresso. One of the most popular trattoria specialties is Tuscan bread salad (panzanella)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
I do love looking at Restaurant Week menus. Some of them are so lame! Salt Tavern in Upper Fells Point has a good one. It looks freshly considered -- although, that's a given at Salt, where Jason Ambrose and company regularly overhauls the menu. Also, the RW menu at Salt has more than the usual number of choices but is still focused and manageable. What do you think about Salt's RW menu -- if you haven't been for a while, does it tempt you to go back. First Course (choice of one)
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | March 26, 2008
The bulb and seeds of fennel are well-known in Mediterranean cooking, but you may not know that they generally are harvested from different varieties. Foeniculum dulce, also know as Florence fennel, produces the largest bulbs. F. vulgare, also known as common fennel, is generally grown for the seeds - used to flavor sausage or baked goods, among other foods - according to A Cook's Guide to Growing Herbs, Greens, & Aromatics, by Millie Owen. Mostly white but tinged with green, the bulbs have tightly overlapping layers that can be tough and stringy on the outside, but tender closer to the core.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Bacon-wrapped oysters with Old Bay butter, “Peachy Keen” crab cakes and Old Bay chocolate ice cream are just a few of the items that earned Alonso's Restaurant bragging rights and an award of 70 pounds of Old Bay Seasoning.  Alonso's recipes were competing against other restaurants in the recently concluded Old Bay “Taste of Baytriotism” restaurant promotion. Larry Perl of the Messenger was at the scene when the 70 pounds of Old Bay arrived at Alonso's kitchen door.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 10, 2011
On Thanksgiving, one blessing for some of us is a large-group feast that we plan and prepare in stages for several days, if not weeks. Regardless of whether some of the guests are bringing a variety of side dishes, the head chef still has to wrestle with a turkey or two. Depending on the size this usually requires getting ol' Tom into the oven in the wee hours of Thanksgiving morning. Others of us are thankful for a smaller party. And it is to those November celebrants we proffer this petite menu of seasonal dishes that, while "lavish," can allow us to sleep in on Turkey Day, at least till it's light out. It may seem to flaunt tradition, but this somewhat free-form menu is designed for six (but there's plenty for eight)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
I do love looking at Restaurant Week menus. Some of them are so lame! Salt Tavern in Upper Fells Point has a good one. It looks freshly considered -- although, that's a given at Salt, where Jason Ambrose and company regularly overhauls the menu. Also, the RW menu at Salt has more than the usual number of choices but is still focused and manageable. What do you think about Salt's RW menu -- if you haven't been for a while, does it tempt you to go back. First Course (choice of one)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
This is the kind of salsa I’m used to having at home in Arizona. It uses fresh ingredients and none of it’s pureed or cooked. I used to get into arguments with my Texas boyfriend about what made the perfect salsa. (He would secretly cook and puree my salsa when I wasn’t around.) Well, I think my  version is better than his. Of course.   Salsa Fresca About 1lb fresh tomatoes 1/4 C cilantro 1/4 C red onion 1 medium jalapeno (remove the seeds or start with half if you like milder salsa)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2008
Chipotle-flavored bratwurst from the butcher shop takes center stage in this fall celebration of the grill. The spicy smokiness of the brats takes on an extra dimension when the links are grilled, especially if they are cooked over hardwood lump charcoal. I like to top the brats with chopped red bell pepper and red onion. I char the bell pepper right on the coals, then grill thick slices of red onion alongside the brats. It's your choice whether to serve it all in a bun. Round out the bratwurst with potato salad and coleslaw.
NEWS
By Emily Nunn and Emily Nunn,Chicago Tribune | October 8, 2008
If you can find a brioche loaf for this simple sandwich, all the better, but it's dreamy on plain white toast, too. And it's so fast, it will make you feel spoiled. In fact, it's the kind of white-toast sandwich that ladies-who-lunch might order at the lunch counter at an upscale department store if ladies-who-lunch still ate white-toast sandwiches at upscale department store lunch counters in the year 2008. Maybe they do. If so, here's to the ladies-who-lunch. shrimp sandwiches with chile mayonnaise (makes 4 sandwiches)
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | November 4, 1990
Phoenix, Ariz., enjoys a well-deserved reputation as a center of innovative Southwest cooking. For in addition to its many hole-in-the-wall Mexican joints serving border food, its climate and burgeoning population have attracted several world-class chefs anxious to incorporate fresh and spicy local ingredients into their cooking.New Southwest cooking is a true amalgam of styles and ingredients, with an emphasis on hardwood-grilled meats and assertive sweet, sour and hot flavors. It is a happy combination of the native dishes of local Pueblo Indians and Sonoran Mexicans, the traditional cuisine of the conquering Spaniards and the sensibilities of chefs trained in classic French techniques.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
This is the kind of salsa I’m used to having at home in Arizona. It uses fresh ingredients and none of it’s pureed or cooked. I used to get into arguments with my Texas boyfriend about what made the perfect salsa. (He would secretly cook and puree my salsa when I wasn’t around.) Well, I think my  version is better than his. Of course.   Salsa Fresca About 1lb fresh tomatoes 1/4 C cilantro 1/4 C red onion 1 medium jalapeno (remove the seeds or start with half if you like milder salsa)
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | March 26, 2008
The bulb and seeds of fennel are well-known in Mediterranean cooking, but you may not know that they generally are harvested from different varieties. Foeniculum dulce, also know as Florence fennel, produces the largest bulbs. F. vulgare, also known as common fennel, is generally grown for the seeds - used to flavor sausage or baked goods, among other foods - according to A Cook's Guide to Growing Herbs, Greens, & Aromatics, by Millie Owen. Mostly white but tinged with green, the bulbs have tightly overlapping layers that can be tough and stringy on the outside, but tender closer to the core.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
American Masala By Suvir Saran with Raquel Pelzel Tangy Tart Hot & Sweet By Padma Lakshmi Weinstein Books / 2007 / $34.95 Although Padma Lakshmi also hails from India, Tangy Tart Hot & Sweet is less an homage to the author's ethnic roots than a tasting tour of her favorite international flavors. In fact, it's fair to say that the book, whose recipes hopscotch the globe, is really a celebration of Lakshmi, the model, author and actress best known as the host of Bravo's Top Chef. The 265-page book is liberally seasoned with her pictures.
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