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Red October

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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy didn't realize he was forever changing the spy novel back in 1982, while working in obscurity on his first book, a Cold War thriller centering on the defection of a Soviet naval captain and the technologically advanced submarine he includes in the bargain. But then "The Hunt for Red October" was published, and things would never be the same - not for spy fiction, which was given new life by the detail-obsessed "techno-thriller" genre he invented, and certainly not for Clancy, who seemingly out of nowhere became one of the country's most prominent authors.
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By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
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NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | October 16, 1991
It would seem that success can be measured in different ways.When insurance agent-turned-author Tom Clancy wrote a story about the successful mutiny and defection of a Soviet missile submarine called "The Hunt for Red October" in 1984, it made him a highly popular author.When Navy Lt. Gregory D. Young wrote a graduate thesis in 1982 onthe 1975 mutiny and attempted defection of a Soviet anti-submarine vessel that helped inspire Clancy, it earned him credit toward a master's degree in national security affairs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Tribune newspapers | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" subsequently inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, died Tuesday after a brief illness at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. His lawyer, Thompson "Topper" Webb, of the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, confirmed his death. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, an author and former Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for The Washington Post.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Tribune newspapers | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" subsequently inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, died Tuesday after a brief illness at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. His lawyer, Thompson "Topper" Webb, of the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, confirmed his death. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, an author and former Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for The Washington Post.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | August 28, 2005
THE LAST SENTRY: THE TRUE STORY THAT INSPIRED THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER By Gregory D. Young and Nate Braden. Naval Institute Press. 250 pages. Tom Clancy, an obscure Maryland insurance agent neglecting business because he wanted to write, was nosing about in the basement of the Naval Academy library when he stumbled on a postgraduate thesis by a young U.S. Navy officer that described a mutiny on a Soviet warship called the Storozhevoy -- in English, the...
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 19, 1992
Now that "Patriot Games" is packing crowds into theaters, Mace Neufeld can afford a look back at how the high-profile project came together -- and almost didn't. Mr. Neufeld and partner Robert Rehme produced the Harrison Ford thriller based on Tom Clancy's tome, and he's been involved on every level of the project.The picture made news before the cameras even started rolling, when Alec Baldwin -- CIA analyst Jack Ryan in "The Hunt for Red October" -- ankled the sequel because of a schedule conflict (he was set to star with Jessica Lange in the Broadway revival of "A Streetcar Named Desire")
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the prolific Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, earning him the nickname "king of the techno-thriller," died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness. He was 66. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, a Baltimore author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former film critic for The Washington Post.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1990
In video the seasons come and go as they do everywhere, if not always in sync with seasons in other entertainments with which video competes for time and attention.Early autumn, for example, with a new TV season unfolding, is usually a slower period in video stores. But this fall there are some big titles to promote -- three principal specimens being "Pretty Woman," with Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, one of the best box-office performers of all time (Oct. 19); "Total Recall," with Arnold Schwarzenegger (Nov.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the prolific Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, earning him the nickname "king of the techno-thriller," died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness. He was 66. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, a Baltimore author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former film critic for The Washington Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy didn't realize he was forever changing the spy novel back in 1982, while working in obscurity on his first book, a Cold War thriller centering on the defection of a Soviet naval captain and the technologically advanced submarine he includes in the bargain. But then "The Hunt for Red October" was published, and things would never be the same - not for spy fiction, which was given new life by the detail-obsessed "techno-thriller" genre he invented, and certainly not for Clancy, who seemingly out of nowhere became one of the country's most prominent authors.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | October 7, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — No active big league starter had gone longer without pitching in the playoffs than the Phillies' Roy Halladay. So in Wednesday's opener of the National League Division Series, he more than made up for the wait, no-hitting the Cincinnati Reds in a 4-0 win. Halladay was masterful, retiring the first 14 Reds before walking Jay Bruce on a full-count pitch with two outs in the fifth inning. But that was all Cincinnati got as Halladay came within a pitch of his second perfect game of the season and the second perfect game in postseason history.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | October 28, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The big brother, the one who had been cast aside and told he no longer could do this, and the younger brother, the one with the golden arm who inadvertently pushed his older sibling away, held each other and wept. Standing on the Busch Stadium infield, just paces beyond that mound where the older brother had just starred, the two men exchanged "I love yous" and wept again. The saying goes there is no crying in baseball, but in October, on the sport's biggest stage, anything can and will happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | August 28, 2005
THE LAST SENTRY: THE TRUE STORY THAT INSPIRED THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER By Gregory D. Young and Nate Braden. Naval Institute Press. 250 pages. Tom Clancy, an obscure Maryland insurance agent neglecting business because he wanted to write, was nosing about in the basement of the Naval Academy library when he stumbled on a postgraduate thesis by a young U.S. Navy officer that described a mutiny on a Soviet warship called the Storozhevoy -- in English, the...
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 19, 1992
Now that "Patriot Games" is packing crowds into theaters, Mace Neufeld can afford a look back at how the high-profile project came together -- and almost didn't. Mr. Neufeld and partner Robert Rehme produced the Harrison Ford thriller based on Tom Clancy's tome, and he's been involved on every level of the project.The picture made news before the cameras even started rolling, when Alec Baldwin -- CIA analyst Jack Ryan in "The Hunt for Red October" -- ankled the sequel because of a schedule conflict (he was set to star with Jessica Lange in the Broadway revival of "A Streetcar Named Desire")
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | October 7, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — No active big league starter had gone longer without pitching in the playoffs than the Phillies' Roy Halladay. So in Wednesday's opener of the National League Division Series, he more than made up for the wait, no-hitting the Cincinnati Reds in a 4-0 win. Halladay was masterful, retiring the first 14 Reds before walking Jay Bruce on a full-count pitch with two outs in the fifth inning. But that was all Cincinnati got as Halladay came within a pitch of his second perfect game of the season and the second perfect game in postseason history.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 15, 1990
CINCINNATI -- The dog did it.The Cincinnati Reds are so draped in history that it's hard to believe the credibility of the entire organization could be cast into doubt by one silly looking St. Bernard.But there it was, right in the 1986 media guide, a half page (with photo) devoted to Schottzie, right there in front of the club vice presidents and everything. The owner's dog had a front-office job. Had the Cincinnati Reds -- one of the charter members of the National League way back in 1876 -- really come to this?
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | October 16, 1991
It would seem that success can be measured in different ways.When insurance agent-turned-author Tom Clancy wrote a story about the successful mutiny and defection of a Soviet missile submarine called "The Hunt for Red October" in 1984, it made him a highly popular author.When Navy Lt. Gregory D. Young wrote a graduate thesis in 1982 onthe 1975 mutiny and attempted defection of a Soviet anti-submarine vessel that helped inspire Clancy, it earned him credit toward a master's degree in national security affairs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 15, 1990
CINCINNATI -- The dog did it.The Cincinnati Reds are so draped in history that it's hard to believe the credibility of the entire organization could be cast into doubt by one silly looking St. Bernard.But there it was, right in the 1986 media guide, a half page (with photo) devoted to Schottzie, right there in front of the club vice presidents and everything. The owner's dog had a front-office job. Had the Cincinnati Reds -- one of the charter members of the National League way back in 1876 -- really come to this?
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