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NEWS
April 13, 2014
Columnist Susan Reimer says that the gender pay gap and the Paycheck Fairness Act are red meat tossed into our cages to get women to the polls and that she doesn't like being "played" by the Democrats ("Equal pay riles up base," April 10). Ms. Reimer makes a point that speaks to the heart of the matter. According to recent polls, Democrats are facing a tough midterm election, and their latest tactic is to use women to garner votes. The Democrats have thrown pay equality into the mix hoping to steer the conversation away from Obamacare and the stagnant economy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2014
From: Cotes du Rhone, France Price: $16 Serve with: Salmon, ham, fried chicken The color may be pink but don't be fooled: This is a wine with some muscle. Produced by one of the greatest winemakers on Earth, this is about as good as rose gets. Its intense, penetrating flavors include hints of cherry, strawberry and rosehips. It's grip on the palate is impressive. If you ever serve rose with red meat, this should be the one. -- Michael Dresser , The Baltimore Sun
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HEALTH
By Ellen Loreck, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Ellen Loreck, MS, RD, LDN;, weighs in on red meat. Picture this: You're out to dinner and there are juicy porterhouse steaks, sumptuous burgers, and tender ribs on the menu. Salivating yet? Then you worry that eating red meat, particularly fatty and processed meat, poses additional health risks. So, the question is: Should you eat these tasty meats and if so, how much? The warning A 2012 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine concluded that an increased intake of red meat, both unprocessed and processed, was associated with a higher risk of death.
NEWS
April 13, 2014
Columnist Susan Reimer says that the gender pay gap and the Paycheck Fairness Act are red meat tossed into our cages to get women to the polls and that she doesn't like being "played" by the Democrats ("Equal pay riles up base," April 10). Ms. Reimer makes a point that speaks to the heart of the matter. According to recent polls, Democrats are facing a tough midterm election, and their latest tactic is to use women to garner votes. The Democrats have thrown pay equality into the mix hoping to steer the conversation away from Obamacare and the stagnant economy.
NEWS
By Larry Williams | March 28, 2009
I am a 64-year-old office worker, overweight, a recent veteran of a triple bypass operation and a recovering red meat addict. Every day I crave the stuff - sausages, Big Macs, New York strip steaks, cheese steaks, bologna, hot dogs, chili - you name it and if it's red meat, I love it. My doctors have warned me, my wife has pleaded and still I yearn for red meat. Each time I slip and eat the stuff, I tell myself that it's not that bad, that my normal diet is generally healthy - oatmeal for breakfast, a salad for lunch and chicken or fish with veggies for dinner.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
Giant Food, which has seen its sales of red meat decline as consumers have increasingly switched to poultry, has laid off about 45 of its 750 meat cutters and shifted another 70 from full-time to part-time status.The layoffs were the first since the early 1970s at Landover-based Giant, company spokesman Barry Scher said yesterday. He said some of the workers, who earn from $10 an hour to $14 an hour, would be offered other jobs in the company's stores, but that those positions would pay less.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 24, 1992
Because political campaigns have become a form of public entertainment, I knew it would not be long until we got to the red meat.Red meat is what you toss to the lions to get them excited. And in a nationally televised debate in New Hampshire on Sunday, red meat was tossed at the Democratic candidates for president.But this red meat was meant to excite us, the voters.Cokie Roberts of ABC News was the moderator. She asked a question about "the rape of an 11-year-old boy at 8 o'clock in the morning on his way to school.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | December 18, 1990
Astudy that last week showed a link between colon cancer and red meat confirmed what health experts have been saying for years: It's best to limit how often you eat meat and how much you eat when you do."One of the most important things about the study is that it comes after a lot of other evidence," said Dr. Walter C. Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.Dr. Willett, director of the six-year study of the dietary habits of 88,751 nurses, found that those who ate beef, lamb or pork every day had 2 1/2 times the risk of colon cancer as those who ate red meat once a month or less.
NEWS
June 5, 1996
MARYLAND DEMOCRATS apparently believe the Second Congressional District may be their best chance for unseating an incumbent, hoping that dissatisfaction with Newt Gingrich has softened support for one of the House speaker's star pupils, Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.State Republicans, however, have long had their eyes on another district that they think is ripe for the taking: the Fifth District seat held for eight terms by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer.Even before the '94 Republican revolution, GOP leaders sensed that Mr. Hoyer was vulnerable.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
As millions of Americans fill their plates with protein-rich steak and burgers rather than carb-heavy pasta or potatoes, researchers are reporting the strongest evidence yet that eating a lot of red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Those who ate the equivalent of a hamburger a day were about 30 percent to 40 percent more likely to develop cancer of the colon or rectum than those who ate less than half that amount. Long-term consumption of high amounts of processed meat such as hot dogs increased the risk of colon cancer by 50 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014
2011 Newman's Own Cabernet Sauvignon From: California Price: $10 Serve with: Red meat, pasta, pizza This red wine from the company founded by the late, great actor Paul Newman is a terrific value. No, it's not the most complex cabernet to ever come out of California, but it holds its own with many that fetch twice its price. It's a medium- to full-bodied wine with up-front, accessible flavors of black cherry and vanilla. It could be even better in a year or two, but it's mighty easy drinking right now. -- Michael Dresser
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Shanti Lewis, a registered dietitian. The benefits of eating less meat? Decreased cancer risk, improving heart health, helping the environment, weight management and financial benefits are just a few. Helping your diet It may seem obvious that exchanging a hamburger for a black bean burger is an easy way to cut fat and calories out of your meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013
From: Central Coast, Calif. Price: $15 Serve with: Red meat, especially with raspberry sauce The GSM stands for grenache, syrah and mourvedre - the three classic Rhone Valley grapes that go into this exceptional red blend. The wine is extremely fruity and smooth, with deep flavor of raspberries and Chambord liqueur. It's one of those dry wines that gives the impression of sweetness through its sheer abundance of fruit. It's penetrating, intense and finishes with fine acidity.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
The new link between meat consumption and heart disease, discovered by Dr. Stanley Hazen of the Cleveland Clinic, is just the latest evidence linking meat consumption to killer diseases that cripple, then kill, 1.3 million Americans annually. Dr. Hazen's study showed that carnitine, an amino acid contained in all meat products, is a major factor in heart failure. Similarly, an Oxford University study of nearly 45,000 adults in last January's American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that vegetarians were 32 percent less likely to be suffer from heart disease than people who ate meat and fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013
Growing up in Rocky Mount, Va., Myxolydia Tyler loved watching local theater company Jack Tale Players. "I was in awe of how they told stories, and then I saw 'A Raisin in the Sun' on a high school theater trip, and that began my love affair with theater. " Tyler, 32, who now lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., has steadily appeared on the stage since then. She's currently starring in Center Stage 's production of the Broadway hit "The Mountaintop" (running since Jan. 9, the show's opening night is tonight and runs through Feb. 24)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
This wonderfully made red blend of cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah and other varieties is immensely appealing in a purely sensual way. It's not a wine for contemplation but sheer enjoyment with its medium-full body and lush fruit. It offers a rich variety of flavors including black cherry, raspberry, herbs and winter mulling spices. It gives the impression of sweetness without actually being sweet — a wonderful characteristic in a wine. From: Columbia Valley, Washington Price: $15 Serve with: Hearty stew, red meat
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2004
The Original Steakhouse and Sports Theatre can be chaotic. And loud. It's certainly crowded. Reservations aren't taken, and on a recent Saturday night, I was told a table wouldn't be available for at least 90 minutes. Clearly, the restaurant, part of a small Florida-based chain, has been doing well since it opened last November in a new Edgewater shopping center. Pager in hand, my friends and I ambled off to the bar. At least our wait wasn't boring. The rip-roaring standing-room-only bar area had more than a dozen televisions, including several giant ones, showing race cars, a hockey game and other sports.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | March 21, 2007
For this month's Make Over My Meal came a novel subject -- the man who never eats in. "I eat out 21 meals a week, 52 weeks a year, year in and year out," real-estate lawyer Stuart Kaplow wrote to us. "And no, I never do takeout." Working hard and playing hard are firmly in Kaplow's repertoire. But cooking? Not so much. He says he doesn't generally bring food into his Brooklandville home. Nor does he set foot in grocery stores. Late-night munch-ies? Because he likes to be ready to wake up early, that's not a problem.
HEALTH
By Ellen Loreck, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Ellen Loreck, MS, RD, LDN;, weighs in on red meat. Picture this: You're out to dinner and there are juicy porterhouse steaks, sumptuous burgers, and tender ribs on the menu. Salivating yet? Then you worry that eating red meat, particularly fatty and processed meat, poses additional health risks. So, the question is: Should you eat these tasty meats and if so, how much? The warning A 2012 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine concluded that an increased intake of red meat, both unprocessed and processed, was associated with a higher risk of death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Longtime readers know I am a strong proponent of boxed wines. It is a great delivery system, but at the end of the day it's about the quality of the wine inside. This red wine is simply the best red I've encountered in a box to date. It's a medium-bodied wine with ripe, intense flavors of raspberry and wild berries and a touch of earthiness. It's just a very well-rounded red wine that's ready to drink young but doesn't seem fragile or weak. At the equivalent of about $5 a bottle, this is a steal.
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