Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRed Line
IN THE NEWS

Red Line

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 15, 2013
Your article regarding the proposed Red Line in Baltimore ("Red Line interest high," June 11) is not complete. You report 400 contractors, engineering firms, investment bankers and rail-car manufacturers attended the meeting to inquire about how they can get a share of the money proposed for the Red Line. What you leave out is the input from the Canton residents who don't want it. Several reasons they give are the line running down the middle of Boston Street and the fact that portions of Boston Street lie within a flood plain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate said Larry Hogan indicated Wednesday that his opposition to state financing of the construction of Baltimore's Red Line and another large transit project doesn't necessarily mean forever. Hogan continued to insist, as he has since launching his campaign, that the state cannot afford to begin building the $2.6 billion Red Line and $2.4 billion Purple Line In the Washington suburbs at this time.  “I'm not really opposed to the Red Line or the Purple Line and both of them I think are worth considering and I'm not even opposed to continuing along the planning and engineering phases, but quite frankly, you know, we've robbed a billion dollars out of the Transportation Trust Fund,” Hogan said.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Your article highlighting the O'Malley administration's proposal of $90 million for engineering work on the Red and Purple lines is excellent news ("$90 million proposed for new light rail lines," Sept. 21). Investment in new public transportation projects, like Baltimore's Red Line and the Washington-area Purple Line, is not only good for the environment but also good for the economy and quality of life. The Red Line, for instance, would reduce the number of cars on the road, connect people to major employment and entertainment centers, and create jobs.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
Recently, a huge community meeting was held in Canton to discuss the Red Line and how it would impact the flood plain along Boston Street. Elected officials and all major news media were invited to attend. Unfortunately, The Sun, and the TV media did not feel it necessary to report this local news. The Sun would prefer to write articles about President Barack Obama's golf game and will apparently wait for the next big storm to report big news of a Red Line tunnel being flooded and costing millions of dollars to repair.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
As a new business, "MiY Home" and "Sleep Lab Z," we are very excited for the Red Line coming two blocks from our store ( "MTA announces series of 'open houses' on Red Line," Sept. 16). We purchased two connected abandoned buildings in the back of Fells Point (Douglass Place). One factor in doing this was that Baltimore was putting in a Red Line and people could get around and visit us without getting into cars to go shop in the furniture stores outside the city. I know the Red Line is controversial, but many of my neighbors and business peers have planted down roots in homes and businesses along the stops because this project moves Baltimore closer to being a world city.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
As a city homeowner and transit user, I am extremely pleased to see that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is fighting to secure the Red Line ("Mayor reaffirms city's support for Red Line," July 24). If Baltimore is to be competitive in the years ahead, it needs a greatly improved transit network, particularly at a time when so many Americans are choosing to invest in walkable urban communities with strong public transportation options. The Red Line is as integral to attracting 10,000 new families as part of the mayor's continuing efforts to reduce property taxes and improve the overall fiscal health of the city, as evidenced by our recently improved bond rating.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Michael Dresser's recent article entitled "Rally urges Red Line jobs for Baltimoreans" (Aug. 5) raises an important issue. As our regional and national economies continue their emergence from the depths of the Great Recession, we must focus on infrastructure projects that will promote large-scale job growth. Clearly, the Red Line is a great example of such a project. Late last year, the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute conducted a study to determine the likely economic impact of the Red Line transit project.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
As a 15-year resident of Baltimore City, I am still astonished by the idea of the Red Line being developed as it is designed ( "Forward thinking on the Red Line," July 28). The idea of the Red Line is to bring access from the west and east wings to the downtown area. As a resident of the Fells Point-Canton area, I do not know one resident who feels this is a good idea or desirable for our community. North Avenue is basically a ghost town with more boarded up blocks of homes than anywhere else in the city.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
The recent commentary concerning Harbor Point and the hexavalent chromium clearly describes the potential harm to the surrounding residents, but there is another issue that should be of a greater concern ("Harbor Point environmental questions," Dec. 2). The single monitoring well in Back Bay at the Living Classroom Foundation campus, just north of the Harbor Point site, has at least 40,000 times the concentration of hexavalent chromium that is penetrating the surrounding soil.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
As a new business, "MiY Home" and "Sleep Lab Z," we are very excited for the Red Line coming two blocks from our store ( "MTA announces series of 'open houses' on Red Line," Sept. 16). We purchased two connected abandoned buildings in the back of Fells Point (Douglass Place). One factor in doing this was that Baltimore was putting in a Red Line and people could get around and visit us without getting into cars to go shop in the furniture stores outside the city. I know the Red Line is controversial, but many of my neighbors and business peers have planted down roots in homes and businesses along the stops because this project moves Baltimore closer to being a world city.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
The article "City, county agree to help pay for Red Line as cost rises to $2.9 billion" (Aug. 26) was disturbing. As one who was born and raised in the area, I remember well the many trains moving along Fleet Street and Aliceanna Streets when automobile traffic (crossing both north and south) would come to a complete halt. While waiting for the box cars to pass, there were times they would then be reversed in moving - thereby doubling your wait time to cross. Many houses on both sides of the streets took the brunt from the heavy trains causing them to vibrate and shake.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The Maryland Department of Transportation announced $280 million in new projects in its annual budget proposal released Tuesday, far less than the billions in capital improvements announced after the increase in the state's gas tax last year. The state's latest "consolidated transportation program," which covers transportation spending from 2015 to 2020, instead pushes along various projects announced last year, including about $1.5 billion worth in the Baltimore region. The draft budget will be taken up by the General Assembly in the coming legislative session.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 29, 2014
President Obama, in his determination to get American foreign policy off what he has called "a perpetual war footing," must take care now not to box himself in with any more comments about "red lines" that restrict his options. As he appraises the growing threats to U.S. security from the Islamic State, the jihadist group that has taken over much of Syria and Iraq, he must make clear his continuing prerogative to take military action in legitimate self-defense. That remains so despite his repeated statements, made as if to ease fears at home and abroad, that there is "no military solution" to the crises in Iraq andUkraine.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
As the Red Line's cost escalates yet again to near $3 billion, how much longer can the MTA keep saying these increases are "unexpected" ( "City, county agree to help pay for Red Line as cost rises to $2.9 billion," Aug. 26)? The Red Line started in 2002 as part of a three-project transit plan with a combined cost of $2.5 billion to be completed by 2014. By 2008, plans for the two other projects were dropped and the Red Line became an isolated system, unconnected to any other transit line at a projected cost of $1.6 billion.
NEWS
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | August 28, 2014
Baltimore City elicits genuine pride from its residents. Every neighborhood is unique, and generations of families have stayed here because they were not willing to give up on this great city. After decades of population decline, Baltimore is finally growing again. We did not get here by accident, nor did we get here by thinking small. I am determined to grow Baltimore by continuing to build projects that will sustain Baltimore well into the future. Thousands of local jobs are being created through projects like the recently opened Horseshoe Baltimore Casino.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Last month, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz wrote a letter to Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith Jr. indicating his displeasure with certain aspects of the proposed Red Line light rail project. He doesn't want the county to contribute nearly as much as the state has proposed, and he wants the county's portion of the 14-mile line to be built in an "early phase" of construction. But that doesn't really capture the sheer audacity of the letter. That Mr. Kamenetz would make such demands on such a major transportation project is truly the tail wagging the dog. What he is barking at is a mere $50 million contribution - compared to financially-strapped Baltimore's expected $200 million share.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
Baltimore's proposed Red Line passed a significant milestone this week with mixed results. The good news is that officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged a combined $280 million to help build the 14-mile light rail project, less enthralling is that the total cost has risen a quarter-billion dollars to $2.9 billion. Critics will no doubt seize on the higher cost as a sign of incompetence, waste, poor planning or the usual brickbats thrown at taxpayer-financed projects of all kinds.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
Baltimore's proposed Red Line passed a significant milestone this week with mixed results. The good news is that officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged a combined $280 million to help build the 14-mile light rail project, less enthralling is that the total cost has risen a quarter-billion dollars to $2.9 billion. Critics will no doubt seize on the higher cost as a sign of incompetence, waste, poor planning or the usual brickbats thrown at taxpayer-financed projects of all kinds.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Baltimore city and county leaders announced Tuesday that they are committing a combined $280 million to fund construction of the Red Line light rail even as the estimated cost for the project has ballooned to $2.9 billion. The local contributions are considered critical for the Woodlawn-to-East Baltimore transit line to proceed. As federal transportation funding has dwindled in recent years, officials prioritizing infrastructure improvements around the country have favored projects that include state and local cost sharing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.