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Red Knot

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NEWS
June 24, 2011
To set the record straight, conservation organizations aren't the only ones that believe red knots should be protected under the Endangered Species Act ("Counting crabs," June 20). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agrees, which is why it placed the shorebird on the ESA candidate list in 2006. And we are not alone in supporting a moratorium on the harvest of horseshoe crabs; leading red knot scientists from the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil also support a timeout on the take of crabs of Delaware Bay origin — particularly after observing a 5,000 bird drop in wintering locations this year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Would a horseshoe crab harvest ban save the red knot? As scientists who have collectively studied red knots, our response is an unequivocal yes. Horseshoe crab eggs are critical to the red knot's ability to complete their spring migration and reproduce in the Canadian Arctic. Without ample numbers of breeding crabs laying eggs on Delaware Bay beaches, red knots will continue to decline. For years we hoped that the modest reductions of horseshoe crab harvests would lead to increases in egg densities, especially after New Jersey's 2006 moratorium.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
COOK'S BEACH, N.J. — The small bird sitting along this sandy spit of land is starving and dinner offerings are slim. Having flown 5,000 miles from South America and with 5,000 to go to its Arctic breeding ground, the red knot needs to fatten up along Delaware Bay or die. For tens of thousands of birds over the last decade, death has been inevitable. The red knot population, scientists believe, may be down to its last 25,000. Two weeks ago, bird experts and environmentalists called on the federal government to accelerate the review process for placing the red knot on the endangered species list.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
To set the record straight, conservation organizations aren't the only ones that believe red knots should be protected under the Endangered Species Act ("Counting crabs," June 20). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agrees, which is why it placed the shorebird on the ESA candidate list in 2006. And we are not alone in supporting a moratorium on the harvest of horseshoe crabs; leading red knot scientists from the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil also support a timeout on the take of crabs of Delaware Bay origin — particularly after observing a 5,000 bird drop in wintering locations this year.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
It is difficult not to be moved by the plight of the red knot, the small shorebird that migrates 9,300 miles annually from South America all the way to the Canadian Arctic, one of the longest such journeys of any bird on the planet. Their numbers have dwindled to an alarming level. Critical to the species' survival is what happens in Maryland's backyard. The red knots make a stopover in Delaware Bay each spring (usually peaking around Memorial Day weekend) to feast on eggs laid by horseshoe crabs, which appear on coastal beaches at just the right time to spawn.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Would a horseshoe crab harvest ban save the red knot? As scientists who have collectively studied red knots, our response is an unequivocal yes. Horseshoe crab eggs are critical to the red knot's ability to complete their spring migration and reproduce in the Canadian Arctic. Without ample numbers of breeding crabs laying eggs on Delaware Bay beaches, red knots will continue to decline. For years we hoped that the modest reductions of horseshoe crab harvests would lead to increases in egg densities, especially after New Jersey's 2006 moratorium.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMPSON and CANDUS THOMPSON,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
It is one of those exquisitely choreographed moments in nature: A small bird on its way from the bottom of the world to its breeding ground at the top encounters its nutritional lifeline as it lands on sandy beaches along the Delaware Bay. Red knots arrive from South America, exhausted and emaciated. Horseshoe crabs swim from sea to shore, following their prehistoric instinct to procreate. They get together each spring for their annual date, a two-week springtime feast and orgy that has been performed longer than humans have been recording such things.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 7, 2006
Alittle bird needs our help. It doesn't sing a pretty song. You won't find it on a stamp or a license plate or as the subject of a movie. It isn't any state's official anything. But it's in trouble, and if we don't step in, it will disappear - maybe in the next four or five years - and become another entry on the list of things mankind has ruined. In many ways, the red knot is like the menhaden: easy to miss until it's gone. And just like the menhaden, its fate will be decided, in large part, by the same quasi-federal regulatory body that prefers to do its work out of the public eye. On Tuesday, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission will vote whether to help save the red knot.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 14, 2006
This is a good news, bad news column. If you don't want to read the bad stuff over your morning coffee, start with the first item and skip over every other one. After the caffeine kicks in, go back and fill in the blanks. Good news: Menhaden may finally get a break. Tim Kaine, Virginia's new governor, has indicated he will consider capping the industrial harvest of menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay while scientists investigate why there has been a drop in the species' population. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted in August to curb the taking of the fish - the primary food for striped bass - at current levels for five years and set July 1 as the deadline for compliance.
NEWS
By Charles D. Duncan | August 5, 2008
With the Summer Olympics almost upon us, it seems appropriate to take special note of an ultra-marathon champion that seldom gets the attention it deserves. The event is seemingly impossible: a journey from Tierra del Fuego to the Canadian Arctic and back, 9,300 miles each way, in nonstop stages that last days without food or water. And like some nightmare of Roman gladiators, if you fail, you die. But there's a catch: The participants can fly. These ultra-marathoners are migratory red knots, shorebirds not much more than half the weight of a pigeon.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
It is difficult not to be moved by the plight of the red knot, the small shorebird that migrates 9,300 miles annually from South America all the way to the Canadian Arctic, one of the longest such journeys of any bird on the planet. Their numbers have dwindled to an alarming level. Critical to the species' survival is what happens in Maryland's backyard. The red knots make a stopover in Delaware Bay each spring (usually peaking around Memorial Day weekend) to feast on eggs laid by horseshoe crabs, which appear on coastal beaches at just the right time to spawn.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
COOK'S BEACH, N.J. — The small bird sitting along this sandy spit of land is starving and dinner offerings are slim. Having flown 5,000 miles from South America and with 5,000 to go to its Arctic breeding ground, the red knot needs to fatten up along Delaware Bay or die. For tens of thousands of birds over the last decade, death has been inevitable. The red knot population, scientists believe, may be down to its last 25,000. Two weeks ago, bird experts and environmentalists called on the federal government to accelerate the review process for placing the red knot on the endangered species list.
NEWS
By Charles D. Duncan | August 5, 2008
With the Summer Olympics almost upon us, it seems appropriate to take special note of an ultra-marathon champion that seldom gets the attention it deserves. The event is seemingly impossible: a journey from Tierra del Fuego to the Canadian Arctic and back, 9,300 miles each way, in nonstop stages that last days without food or water. And like some nightmare of Roman gladiators, if you fail, you die. But there's a catch: The participants can fly. These ultra-marathoners are migratory red knots, shorebirds not much more than half the weight of a pigeon.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMPSON and CANDUS THOMPSON,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
It is one of those exquisitely choreographed moments in nature: A small bird on its way from the bottom of the world to its breeding ground at the top encounters its nutritional lifeline as it lands on sandy beaches along the Delaware Bay. Red knots arrive from South America, exhausted and emaciated. Horseshoe crabs swim from sea to shore, following their prehistoric instinct to procreate. They get together each spring for their annual date, a two-week springtime feast and orgy that has been performed longer than humans have been recording such things.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 14, 2006
This is a good news, bad news column. If you don't want to read the bad stuff over your morning coffee, start with the first item and skip over every other one. After the caffeine kicks in, go back and fill in the blanks. Good news: Menhaden may finally get a break. Tim Kaine, Virginia's new governor, has indicated he will consider capping the industrial harvest of menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay while scientists investigate why there has been a drop in the species' population. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted in August to curb the taking of the fish - the primary food for striped bass - at current levels for five years and set July 1 as the deadline for compliance.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 7, 2006
Alittle bird needs our help. It doesn't sing a pretty song. You won't find it on a stamp or a license plate or as the subject of a movie. It isn't any state's official anything. But it's in trouble, and if we don't step in, it will disappear - maybe in the next four or five years - and become another entry on the list of things mankind has ruined. In many ways, the red knot is like the menhaden: easy to miss until it's gone. And just like the menhaden, its fate will be decided, in large part, by the same quasi-federal regulatory body that prefers to do its work out of the public eye. On Tuesday, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission will vote whether to help save the red knot.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2007
SLAUGHTER BEACH, DEL. -- This time of year, the horseshoe crabs practically have the place to themselves. With only a sunbather and a smattering of greenhead flies in the distance, the spiderlike creatures mate undisturbed on the sandy shores. But just a few miles away sits what the crab's protectors consider a major threat to a species that is older than dinosaurs - Charlie Auman, a waterman who has spent much of his adult life catching horseshoe crabs and selling them for bait. For the past decade, Delaware officials have been pushing to protect the crabs, which swim into the bay each spring from the ocean and mate by the millions on its shores.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
PORT MAHON, Del. - Waves of wings excitedly flutter and bob over these sandy flats of Delaware Bay in an annual ecological ritual that is one of nature's greatest spectaculars. It is a spring synchrony of migration - of shorebirds from South American winter quarters en route to Arctic breeding grounds and of arch-ancient horseshoe crabs driven from ocean bottoms to spawning beaches by tide, temperature and lunar cycles. One million small birds, some of which fly as far as 20,000 miles a year, alight on these dunes in late May for a critical refueling stop just as the olive-brown, helmet-shaped arthropods lumber ashore to lay billions of eggs in the sand.
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