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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
If you're going to go to a bar on New Year's Day, it might as well be a special place. To watch the Ravens this Sunday, consider Red House Tavern in Canton. A mainstay on the corner of Essex and Leakin streets for years, Red House didn't make its mark until April, when new owner Ron Singer, who also runs Leon's in Mount Vernon, reopened it as a mature alternative for the neighborhood. Under the new management, everything from the decor to the menu was overhauled. Red House is now handsome and classy, with lots of new beers and a terrific menu that includes french fries that taste like they came from Thrasher's in Ocean City . In many ways, it is the ideal neighborhood bar: friendly and familiar without being boring.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
If you're going to go to a bar on New Year's Day, it might as well be a special place. To watch the Ravens this Sunday, consider Red House Tavern in Canton. A mainstay on the corner of Essex and Leakin streets for years, Red House didn't make its mark until April, when new owner Ron Singer, who also runs Leon's in Mount Vernon, reopened it as a mature alternative for the neighborhood. Under the new management, everything from the decor to the menu was overhauled. Red House is now handsome and classy, with lots of new beers and a terrific menu that includes french fries that taste like they came from Thrasher's in Ocean City . In many ways, it is the ideal neighborhood bar: friendly and familiar without being boring.
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NEWS
January 23, 2006
Theodore McMillian, 86, the first black judge on the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, died Wednesday at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis after experiencing complications from kidney dialysis treatments. Judge McMillian was hired as Missouri's first black state prosecutor in 1953. He would become the first black on the state bench, the Missouri Court of Appeals and, in 1978, the U.S. Court of Appeals in St. Louis. Judge McMillian, other jurists and law enforcement officials once went to jail to learn what it was like inside the system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
John Houser III reviews the Red House Tavern in Canton The Red House Tavern , Houser says in his review , is now the "comfortable neighborhood pub it was always meant to be. " Salt, Houser says, most things needed more salt. Here's something worth knowing. Red House has a seven-days happy hours, 3-7 p.m., featuring two-for-one rail drinks and $1.50 National Bohemians.
NEWS
By Jo Thomas and Ralph Blumenthal and Jo Thomas and Ralph Blumenthal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2002
RED HOUSE, Va. - To federal prosecutors, the collection of mobile homes on a field near this tiny southern Virginia town is a "compound" linked to a violent Muslim sect. To the neighbors, it is a mysterious place where outsiders do not seem welcome. But to Abdul Jabbar, 26, a chemist who grew up on the bleak streets of South Philadelphia, it is a place he can live in peace, pray and teach school. In the last seven years, Jabbar and dozens of other Muslims have left poor urban homes to resettle in this corner of Charlotte County, so rural that it has not a single stoplight in its 500 square miles.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
Before 1998, John and Bobbin Kreider lived for 16 years in Howard County in a saltbox-style home known to their neighbors in Dayton as the "Red House. " Bobbin Kreider was happy with their 17 acres, where she was able to keep three horses. That was before she saw an advertisement in an equerry newsletter on the attributes of a 27-acre horse farm with barn, stalls, outbuildings and a two-story farmhouse, circa 1880. And it was only nine miles from the "Red House. " After looking at the property in Sykesville, she was thrilled, but her husband was less so. "I loved the property but hated the house," said John Kreider, 58, recalling the tiny, chopped-up rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
John Houser III reviews the Red House Tavern in Canton The Red House Tavern , Houser says in his review , is now the "comfortable neighborhood pub it was always meant to be. " Salt, Houser says, most things needed more salt. Here's something worth knowing. Red House has a seven-days happy hours, 3-7 p.m., featuring two-for-one rail drinks and $1.50 National Bohemians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
For almost a decade, the Red House Tavern has been a fixture for live music and beer on a quiet side street in Canton. But anyone who remembers the old Red House Tavern will be in for a pleasant surprise these days. A new owner, some major remodeling and a thorough cleaning have made the Red House into the comfortable neighborhood pub it was always meant to be. The food at Red House now features more upscale, global fare than the usual corner bar, while leaving old favorites intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
No one held their breath when Ron Singer bought Canton's Red House Tavern last summer and promised a major renovation. The bar, which had been closed since 2009, hadn't really registered in the neighborhood consciousness. When it was open, it was known more for its loud live music and karaoke. And Singer's most popular bar, Leon's in Mt. Vernon, is known for its shabby chic — to put it kindly. But when Singer says in the new ads that "only the name is the same" at Red House, he's not bluffing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | April 17, 2008
Baltimore needs more Red House Taverns. You may not have heard of the Canton corner bar because it's semi-small and tucked away from the neighborhood's busier sections. As far as bars go, Red House Tavern is pretty nondescript. A few people usually stand outside the brick building puffing on cigarettes, and inside, the usual tchotchkes clutter the walls. But a small, barely elevated stage sits in the back right corner. Open mikes and jam sessions happen three times a week, and local bands play most Friday and Saturday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
For almost a decade, the Red House Tavern has been a fixture for live music and beer on a quiet side street in Canton. But anyone who remembers the old Red House Tavern will be in for a pleasant surprise these days. A new owner, some major remodeling and a thorough cleaning have made the Red House into the comfortable neighborhood pub it was always meant to be. The food at Red House now features more upscale, global fare than the usual corner bar, while leaving old favorites intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
No one held their breath when Ron Singer bought Canton's Red House Tavern last summer and promised a major renovation. The bar, which had been closed since 2009, hadn't really registered in the neighborhood consciousness. When it was open, it was known more for its loud live music and karaoke. And Singer's most popular bar, Leon's in Mt. Vernon, is known for its shabby chic — to put it kindly. But when Singer says in the new ads that "only the name is the same" at Red House, he's not bluffing.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
Before 1998, John and Bobbin Kreider lived for 16 years in Howard County in a saltbox-style home known to their neighbors in Dayton as the "Red House. " Bobbin Kreider was happy with their 17 acres, where she was able to keep three horses. That was before she saw an advertisement in an equerry newsletter on the attributes of a 27-acre horse farm with barn, stalls, outbuildings and a two-story farmhouse, circa 1880. And it was only nine miles from the "Red House. " After looking at the property in Sykesville, she was thrilled, but her husband was less so. "I loved the property but hated the house," said John Kreider, 58, recalling the tiny, chopped-up rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | April 17, 2008
Baltimore needs more Red House Taverns. You may not have heard of the Canton corner bar because it's semi-small and tucked away from the neighborhood's busier sections. As far as bars go, Red House Tavern is pretty nondescript. A few people usually stand outside the brick building puffing on cigarettes, and inside, the usual tchotchkes clutter the walls. But a small, barely elevated stage sits in the back right corner. Open mikes and jam sessions happen three times a week, and local bands play most Friday and Saturday nights.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
Theodore McMillian, 86, the first black judge on the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, died Wednesday at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis after experiencing complications from kidney dialysis treatments. Judge McMillian was hired as Missouri's first black state prosecutor in 1953. He would become the first black on the state bench, the Missouri Court of Appeals and, in 1978, the U.S. Court of Appeals in St. Louis. Judge McMillian, other jurists and law enforcement officials once went to jail to learn what it was like inside the system.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
When Phil and Pamela Monetti outgrew their home of 17 years in Severn, they thought they would buy land and build a house. But they discovered that there was no land to be had. The couple, both self-employed with home offices, then decided to look for an existing house in the county. When they couldn't find something that fit their needs, they bought a new home in the Severn community of Cayuga Farms, about eight miles from their previous house. "We thought a [building] lot would be easy to find.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | May 16, 1991
When the new state performance test came in to Red House Run Elementary in Rosedale Monday, more than a dozen fifth-graders walked out.Parents of 14 fifth-graders at the Baltimore County school kept their children out of test sessions starting Monday to protest the ambitious new exam, complaining that questions surrounding the program had been left unanswered and that parents had been inadequately informed.The tests, being taken by some 160,000 third-, fifth- and eighth-graders statewide, are the linchpin of the state's efforts at educational reform.
NEWS
By Jo Thomas and Ralph Blumenthal and Jo Thomas and Ralph Blumenthal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2002
RED HOUSE, Va. - To federal prosecutors, the collection of mobile homes on a field near this tiny southern Virginia town is a "compound" linked to a violent Muslim sect. To the neighbors, it is a mysterious place where outsiders do not seem welcome. But to Abdul Jabbar, 26, a chemist who grew up on the bleak streets of South Philadelphia, it is a place he can live in peace, pray and teach school. In the last seven years, Jabbar and dozens of other Muslims have left poor urban homes to resettle in this corner of Charlotte County, so rural that it has not a single stoplight in its 500 square miles.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | May 16, 1991
When the new state performance test came in to Red House Run Elementary in Rosedale Monday, more than a dozen fifth-graders walked out.Parents of 14 fifth-graders at the Baltimore County school kept their children out of test sessions starting Monday to protest the ambitious new exam, complaining that questions surrounding the program had been left unanswered and that parents had been inadequately informed.The tests, being taken by some 160,000 third-, fifth- and eighth-graders statewide, are the linchpin of the state's efforts at educational reform.
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