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Red Hook

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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 28, 1994
Brooklyn, N.Y. -- Greg O'Connell is a Brooklyn native and ex-cop who's found a way to make business thrive in Red Hook, one of New York City's toughest neighborhoods.In Civil War-era buildings set on finger piers jutting out into the harbor of Upper New York Bay, a site with stunning views of downtown Manhattan, Mr. O'Connell has created a home for 40 firms with a total of some 150 workers -- many of them ''locals'' recommended by a non-profit friend, the South Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Driving around Baltimore this past summer, I noticed a trend of pulling down houses and replacing them with new ones or paving over the land for a parking lot, as Friends School recently did after demolishing a two-story stucco house that dated to the 1920s next to the North Charles Street campus. Traveling down the 1900 block of Ruxton Road, I cast my eyes to the side, and the stately old mansion that was there when I drove by a few days earlier was gone, with a sign in the freshly graded earth advertising the site as a desirable one for a house.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- The principal of a grade school in one of Brooklyn's toughest neighborhoods, a dedicated, gentle man who often took children by the hand through streets ruled by drug gangs and violence, was slain in an apparent crossfire as he searched for a missing pupil in a crime-ridden housing project.The victim, Patrick Daly, 48, the principal of Public School 15 in the notorious Red Hook waterfront district, whose quiet 24-year struggle on behalf of his pupils had been featured in news stories and on national television, was out looking for a fourth-grade boy who had left school in tears earlier after a fight with another 9-year-old.
NEWS
By Randy Kennedy and Randy Kennedy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 2002
NEW YORK - A quixotic 20-year effort to return trolleys to the streets of Brooklyn - where they were once so plentiful that the borough named its baseball team the Trolley Dodgers - may be coming to an end. After weeks of increasingly bitter financial arguments, the city's Department of Transportation has decided that it will no longer support efforts to provide more federal money to the group trying to build the first trolley line to run in Brooklyn since...
NEWS
By Randy Kennedy and Randy Kennedy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 2002
NEW YORK - A quixotic 20-year effort to return trolleys to the streets of Brooklyn - where they were once so plentiful that the borough named its baseball team the Trolley Dodgers - may be coming to an end. After weeks of increasingly bitter financial arguments, the city's Department of Transportation has decided that it will no longer support efforts to provide more federal money to the group trying to build the first trolley line to run in Brooklyn since...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 28, 1991
Matty Rich's "Straight Out of Brooklyn" is like the story of a curse; it watches a fearful legacy of violence as it is handed down through a family, father to son, dooming them both.The setting is the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, a loveless and shabby urban vista filled with the slab-like buildings of the "Projects," vertical slums that breed despair and inhumanity, and make the trapped spirit yearn for escape, any escape, on any terms.Of course the movie that chronicles this hopeless cycle, by its very existence, belies it. Matty Rich, who lived in Red Hook, started it when he was 17. Raising money, charming and beguiling actors, family, friends and finally distributors, he eventually got it made over two long years and many XTC disappointments.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Driving around Baltimore this past summer, I noticed a trend of pulling down houses and replacing them with new ones or paving over the land for a parking lot, as Friends School recently did after demolishing a two-story stucco house that dated to the 1920s next to the North Charles Street campus. Traveling down the 1900 block of Ruxton Road, I cast my eyes to the side, and the stately old mansion that was there when I drove by a few days earlier was gone, with a sign in the freshly graded earth advertising the site as a desirable one for a house.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 1992
NEW YORK -- They had traveled from Brooklyn to Staten Island to stand quietly in the rear of the church, brushing away their tears, and they had touched the coffin moving past. They had said a final goodbye to their school principal.Now the long black hearse was carrying away the remains of Patrick Daly, and the crowds and the politicians were drifting off. But these three children from the Red Hook Houses were still sobbing. This particular killing had been, they said, just more than they could bear.
NEWS
February 18, 2003
On February 15, 2003, KENNETH PAUL; beloved husband of the late Rhea J. Schroeder (nee Stitley); devoted father of Rob and Valerie Schroeder; step-father of Nancy Bowersox; dear brother of Elizabeth Macrie, of Hammonton NJ, Eleanor Graham of Red Hook, NY, Fred and Carlton Schroeder, of Harbor City, NJ, Joseph Schroeder of Weberville, MI, Norman Schroeder of Oroville, CA, Erwin Schroeder, Towson, MD and the late Jim Schroeder; brother-in-law of Marie Schroeder,...
NEWS
By Nichole M. Christian and Nichole M. Christian,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 2002
NEW YORK - David Sharps found a sunken piece of history and his life's passion in the mud flats of Edgewater, N.J. In 1986, he bought a dilapidated, mud-soaked wooden barge, the Lehigh Valley 79, for $500. A professional clown at the time, Sharps got lots of laughs when he told friends that one day he would resurrect the barge as a floating maritime and performing arts museum. The laughter grew louder when he decided to dock his museum on the waterfront in Red Hook, a sliver of Brooklyn with stunning vistas of the New York Harbor, but so isolated that even people from the neighborhood had trouble finding their way there.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 28, 1994
Brooklyn, N.Y. -- Greg O'Connell is a Brooklyn native and ex-cop who's found a way to make business thrive in Red Hook, one of New York City's toughest neighborhoods.In Civil War-era buildings set on finger piers jutting out into the harbor of Upper New York Bay, a site with stunning views of downtown Manhattan, Mr. O'Connell has created a home for 40 firms with a total of some 150 workers -- many of them ''locals'' recommended by a non-profit friend, the South Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1992
NEW YORK -- The principal of a grade school in one of Brooklyn's toughest neighborhoods, a dedicated, gentle man who often took children by the hand through streets ruled by drug gangs and violence, was slain in an apparent crossfire as he searched for a missing pupil in a crime-ridden housing project.The victim, Patrick Daly, 48, the principal of Public School 15 in the notorious Red Hook waterfront district, whose quiet 24-year struggle on behalf of his pupils had been featured in news stories and on national television, was out looking for a fourth-grade boy who had left school in tears earlier after a fight with another 9-year-old.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 28, 1991
Matty Rich's "Straight Out of Brooklyn" is like the story of a curse; it watches a fearful legacy of violence as it is handed down through a family, father to son, dooming them both.The setting is the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, a loveless and shabby urban vista filled with the slab-like buildings of the "Projects," vertical slums that breed despair and inhumanity, and make the trapped spirit yearn for escape, any escape, on any terms.Of course the movie that chronicles this hopeless cycle, by its very existence, belies it. Matty Rich, who lived in Red Hook, started it when he was 17. Raising money, charming and beguiling actors, family, friends and finally distributors, he eventually got it made over two long years and many XTC disappointments.
FEATURES
By New York Times | January 28, 1991
PARK CITY, Utah -- With less pain and more unanimity than is usual at the Sundance Film Festival, the dramatic film jury awarded its grand prize to "Poison," a first feature by gay filmmaker Todd Haynes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Food trucks from Baltimore andWashington, D.C., 40 in all, are competing on Saturday at A Taste of Two Cities, an all-day event on the Westport Waterfront. Six judges - three from each city - will award the Mayors Cup to the best overall food truck. And event-goers will help determine one people's choice award to a truck from each city. There are still a few Baltimore trucks, new ones, to be announced. But here's the list so far A Taste of Two Cities . Find a Baltimore Food Truck right now   The event runs from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and features four bands, beer and wine.
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