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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 27, 2011
Ravens center Matt Birk appeared on "The Norris & Davis Show" on 105.7 The Fan this morning and chatted about the NFL lockout and how it affects the players' ability to make a living. I'm sick of hearing about all that. But Steve Davis getting Birk's take on red-headed quarterbacks? That got my attention on my morning commute. In case you missed it, here's some context: Peter King chatted with an NFL scout about TCU quarterback Andy Dalton for a recent Sports Illustrated story about the inexact science of selecting a signal-caller in the draft . The scout said that his organization has wondered if red hair could be a factor when evaluating Dalton.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Five years ago, Shawn Theron was waiting tables and managing the bar of the Joy America Cafe inside the American Visionary Art Museum . Today, his work is hanging on the gallery walls. He says it's all because his beloved grandmother — who raised the boy and whom he nicknamed "Red" — urged him from her deathbed to "turn on the light. " "She said it many times," says the 38-year-old artist: "'Turn on the light. Turn on the light.' And it had nothing to do with switches.
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 19, 1996
The Harford County sheriff's office is searching for a man who apparently posed as a deputy, stopping an Edgewood woman in her car and trying to search and handcuff her early Saturday.Melissa Brown, 23, told deputies that the man, driving a gray Chevrolet Caprice with a rotating red dash light, motioned for her to pull over about 1 a.m. near U.S. 40 and Route 543 in Belcamp. The man who was white, with red hair and freckles was wearing a brown uniform with a gold star-shaped badge, the woman said.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 27, 2011
Ravens center Matt Birk appeared on "The Norris & Davis Show" on 105.7 The Fan this morning and chatted about the NFL lockout and how it affects the players' ability to make a living. I'm sick of hearing about all that. But Steve Davis getting Birk's take on red-headed quarterbacks? That got my attention on my morning commute. In case you missed it, here's some context: Peter King chatted with an NFL scout about TCU quarterback Andy Dalton for a recent Sports Illustrated story about the inexact science of selecting a signal-caller in the draft . The scout said that his organization has wondered if red hair could be a factor when evaluating Dalton.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz | February 6, 1992
Better dead than red": It's a slogan that defined an era.And it was more than a rallying cry against the specter of world communism. For most women, "Better dead than red" was a fashion edict that said you're either a blond or a brunette.Then a funny thing happened: We won the Cold War.And suddenly, after decades of repression, it's cool to be red.A redhead, that is."You can see it on the streets of Baltimore," says Jordan Ferraro, a Bolton Hill resident and co-owner of Allure, a beauty salon in suburban Washington.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 26, 2000
A Westminster man was arrested Monday after allegedly cutting off some of his girlfriend's hair with a steak knife, court records show. Richard L. Carbon, 34, of the first block of Union St. was charged with first- and second-degree assault and use of a deadly weapon to injure. He was released on $5,000 bail Monday night. Westminster police responding to a call discovered damaged stereo equipment and clumps of red hair outside the house. According to police reports, Carbon had been drinking when he became angry at his girlfriend, Danielle Zepp Franklin.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 16, 2004
Baltimore County police are seeking the public's help in finding a 44-year-old Catonsville woman who was last seen July 6. Patricia Ann Kelly has not been heard from since July 6, when she used her debit card for routine transactions, including one at a convenience store near White Marsh Mall early that afternoon, police said. She did not show up to work at Baltimore-Washington International Airport that day and also did not attend a family event in Ocean City on July 10, according to police.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
There's bad news going around for the Goldilockses in Hollywood. Word on the street: Blondes had more fun. Just check out the recent hair colors on some of the biggest stars going: Nicole Kidman. Lindsay Lohan. Tyra Banks. Desperate Housewife Marcia Cross. Will & Grace's Debra Messing. Sex and the City's Cynthia Nixon. Sorry Reese. Too bad Paris. Bye-bye Britney, bye-bye. These days, the sexiest sirens are of the Julianne Moore, Susan Sarandon, Lauren Ambrose set. "Red is the new blond," says Tim Rogers, editorial stylist and spokesman for Charles Worthington hair and beauty salons in London.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 25, 2002
THE DAYS SEEM numbered for a big brick house at the northeast corner of Charles and 33rd streets that has been owned by Johns Hopkins University for many years. It sits on the site of a planned new bookstore and has, I presume, outlived its economic usefulness. It's a house of huge proportions, the kind of place built in the era of President William Howard Taft, when North Charles Street was home to the kind of mansions you'd find today in Laurelford or along the Falls Road corridor in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | November 13, 2006
The overcast, rainy skies could have been imported from the Old Country, right along with the taps of Guinness, Harp and Killian's. But the atmosphere inside the Baltimore Irish Festival at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium yesterday radiated plenty of Irish cheer despite the blustery winds that buffeted people walking in. A world of greens, whites and oranges surrounded those who entered Exhibition Hall. Booths beckoned, filled with shamrock-patterned glass and T-shirts bursting with Celtic pride.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | November 13, 2006
The overcast, rainy skies could have been imported from the Old Country, right along with the taps of Guinness, Harp and Killian's. But the atmosphere inside the Baltimore Irish Festival at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium yesterday radiated plenty of Irish cheer despite the blustery winds that buffeted people walking in. A world of greens, whites and oranges surrounded those who entered Exhibition Hall. Booths beckoned, filled with shamrock-patterned glass and T-shirts bursting with Celtic pride.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | September 1, 2006
Staff members at the Columbia Art Center have installed many works of art for the gallery's changing exhibits, but director Liz Henzey said the latest show offered unique challenges. "It's the first time we've had to comb an artwork," she said. Along with more traditional paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures, Hair: A Juried Exhibition inspired conceptual pieces with real and artificial hair attached. Two sculptures used long, straight locks of black hair flowing from wax bases.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
There's bad news going around for the Goldilockses in Hollywood. Word on the street: Blondes had more fun. Just check out the recent hair colors on some of the biggest stars going: Nicole Kidman. Lindsay Lohan. Tyra Banks. Desperate Housewife Marcia Cross. Will & Grace's Debra Messing. Sex and the City's Cynthia Nixon. Sorry Reese. Too bad Paris. Bye-bye Britney, bye-bye. These days, the sexiest sirens are of the Julianne Moore, Susan Sarandon, Lauren Ambrose set. "Red is the new blond," says Tim Rogers, editorial stylist and spokesman for Charles Worthington hair and beauty salons in London.
NEWS
April 8, 2005
Dale Messick, 98, whose long-running comic strip "Brenda Starr, Reporter" gave her entry into the male world of the funny pages and ran in 250 newspapers as its peak in the 1950s, died Tuesday in Penngrove, Calif. Ms. Messick - who jettisoned her given name Dalia to further her career - once said Brenda had "everything I didn't have." Mixing hot copy with high fashion, Brenda plunged from one thrilling adventure to another, sassing her tough-talking editor, Mr. Livwright, and sometimes filing her copy with the only person left in the newsroom, the cleaning woman.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 16, 2004
Baltimore County police are seeking the public's help in finding a 44-year-old Catonsville woman who was last seen July 6. Patricia Ann Kelly has not been heard from since July 6, when she used her debit card for routine transactions, including one at a convenience store near White Marsh Mall early that afternoon, police said. She did not show up to work at Baltimore-Washington International Airport that day and also did not attend a family event in Ocean City on July 10, according to police.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and By Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
Forget a silver spoon. Kelly Osbourne was born with a golden gimmick. Her mother, Sharon, could not have predicted she was carrying the first postmodern multi-media love child. Eighteen years later, rock 'n' roll, reality TV and red hair (well, for a while) have aligned to make Kelly Osbourne, daughter of Ozzy, an instant pop star. Before The Osbournes had its premiere last year, she was a rich rock- star's kid living in relative privacy. Now, one year and several episodes into a second season, she's a household name, a cheeky chick-mag pinup.
NEWS
April 8, 2005
Dale Messick, 98, whose long-running comic strip "Brenda Starr, Reporter" gave her entry into the male world of the funny pages and ran in 250 newspapers as its peak in the 1950s, died Tuesday in Penngrove, Calif. Ms. Messick - who jettisoned her given name Dalia to further her career - once said Brenda had "everything I didn't have." Mixing hot copy with high fashion, Brenda plunged from one thrilling adventure to another, sassing her tough-talking editor, Mr. Livwright, and sometimes filing her copy with the only person left in the newsroom, the cleaning woman.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | September 1, 2006
Staff members at the Columbia Art Center have installed many works of art for the gallery's changing exhibits, but director Liz Henzey said the latest show offered unique challenges. "It's the first time we've had to comb an artwork," she said. Along with more traditional paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures, Hair: A Juried Exhibition inspired conceptual pieces with real and artificial hair attached. Two sculptures used long, straight locks of black hair flowing from wax bases.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 25, 2002
THE DAYS SEEM numbered for a big brick house at the northeast corner of Charles and 33rd streets that has been owned by Johns Hopkins University for many years. It sits on the site of a planned new bookstore and has, I presume, outlived its economic usefulness. It's a house of huge proportions, the kind of place built in the era of President William Howard Taft, when North Charles Street was home to the kind of mansions you'd find today in Laurelford or along the Falls Road corridor in Baltimore County.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 26, 2000
A Westminster man was arrested Monday after allegedly cutting off some of his girlfriend's hair with a steak knife, court records show. Richard L. Carbon, 34, of the first block of Union St. was charged with first- and second-degree assault and use of a deadly weapon to injure. He was released on $5,000 bail Monday night. Westminster police responding to a call discovered damaged stereo equipment and clumps of red hair outside the house. According to police reports, Carbon had been drinking when he became angry at his girlfriend, Danielle Zepp Franklin.
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