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Red Grange

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By ROGER SIMON | January 30, 1991
Red Grange just would not say the words."Naw, naw," he kept telling me. "Aww, naw."C'mon Red, say it. We all know it's true. So just say it."Nope, not me," he said. "Uh-uh."So I said it for him: Red Grange made pro football. If it weren't for what he did more than six decades ago, we would have no choice but to spend our Sundays watching men in pastel sweaters holding thin sticks and hitting dimpled white balls into little holes.Back in 1925, no Goodyear blimps floated over huge crowds packed into gargantuan football stadiums.
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NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai | January 29, 1993
IT'S that time of year again, Super Sunday, the culmination of perhaps the most overwrought two weeks in American sports. )) Need a barf bag if you read one more word about Emmitt (or is it Bruce?) Smith, Troy Aikman and the rest? Take a break with these quips, quotes and quellers from Fantastic Football:* Columnist Blackie Sherrod in the Dallas Morning News: "No one denies Al Davis has left his mark on professional football. Detractors point out that smallpox also leaves a mark."* Ron Meyer, after being fired by the winless Indianapolis Colts: "I was oohing and aahing about the brilliant fall colors the other day. My wife said: 'But Ron, this happens every fall.
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NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | February 3, 1991
The night Red Grange died, one of the cable channels ran a documentary about Jack Dempsey, another of the heroes who made the 1920's the "golden age of sport."It showed grainy black-and-white film of man-to-man combat between Dempsey and boxers like Georges Carpentier and Luis Firpo. On a nearby channel, four-star generals were offering what looked like Nintendo games as news about life-and-death combat in the golden age of television.To re-create the flavor of the Twenties, the Dempsey documentary flashed action photos of Babe Ruth, Bobby Jones and indeed Red Grange -- whom it identified as the quarterback in the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 19, 1991
I had a teacher in high school who had gone to Georgia Tech in the days when it was a perennial national football power. This state institution was also a respected engineering school, the type of place that seemed an odd match for high-powered athletics.But such marriages were those of convenience. That teacher told of taking a class with one of the football players. At exam time one fine spring day, the player positioned himself next to an open window and proceeded to hand his test paper out the window where some unseen person filled in the answers.
SPORTS
By Gerald Eskenazi and Gerald Eskenazi,New York Times News Service | January 29, 1991
Harold "Red" Grange, whose dramatic exploits as a football running back for the University of Illinois and the Chicago Bears more than 60 years ago made him an idol of his age and a legend to later generations, died yesterday at Lake Wales (Fla.) Hospital. He was 87.His wife of 49 years, Margaret, who is his only survivor, said Grange's death was due to complications from pneumonia. He had been hospitalized since July.With his flaming hair and his many notable achievements on the football field -- some so spectacular they still read like fiction -- RedGrange fit easily into that group of superstars that helped elevate the 1920s into a golden age of sports in the United States.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | February 3, 1991
It's often difficult to separate myth from reality in pro football's distant past.Red Grange proved that.When he died last week, most of the obituaries noted that he helped popularize pro football in a tour he made with the Chicago Bears in 1925 after his senior season at the University of Illinois.The facts are somewhat different.A book published last fall by Washington writers Dan Daly and Bob O'Donnell titled, "The Pro Football Chronicle," pointed out the reality of the tour doesn't quite match the the myth, and that Grange's pro career wasn't as storied as his college career.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | February 1, 1991
FOOTBALL WAS a sport back in the Roaring '20s, not yet an industry, and a 5-foot-10, 180-pound halfback was considered good-sized. Of course he seemed a lot smaller if you were trying to catch him. Grantland Rice, an immortal in a different field, summed up the way this haunt ran:"A streak of fire, a breath of flame. Eluding all who reach and clutch. A gray ghost thrown into the game. A rubber bounding, blasting soul. Whose destination is the goal. Red Grange of Illinois." They ran like that in the '20s and, perhaps of equal aesthetic interest, they wrote like that -- and could get away with it. It must have been the influence of radio, and its legitimization of short, staccato bursts of verse.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 29, 1991
INDIAN LAKE ESTATES, Fla. -- From the "Golden Age of Sport," born of the "Roaring '20s," five personalities transcended all others: Babe Ruth in baseball, Jack Dempsey in boxing, Bill Tilden in tennis, Bobby Jones in golf and Red Grange in football. Now the last one has left us.Harold "Red" Grange, 87, died yesterday of complications from pneumonia. He had been hospitalized since July.As often happens with undefined mortality, a reporter was to have visited him last Friday at 3 p.m. His wife, Margaret or, as he called her, "Muggs," suggested, "I don't think it's a good idea.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai | January 29, 1993
IT'S that time of year again, Super Sunday, the culmination of perhaps the most overwrought two weeks in American sports. )) Need a barf bag if you read one more word about Emmitt (or is it Bruce?) Smith, Troy Aikman and the rest? Take a break with these quips, quotes and quellers from Fantastic Football:* Columnist Blackie Sherrod in the Dallas Morning News: "No one denies Al Davis has left his mark on professional football. Detractors point out that smallpox also leaves a mark."* Ron Meyer, after being fired by the winless Indianapolis Colts: "I was oohing and aahing about the brilliant fall colors the other day. My wife said: 'But Ron, this happens every fall.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 19, 1991
I had a teacher in high school who had gone to Georgia Tech in the days when it was a perennial national football power. This state institution was also a respected engineering school, the type of place that seemed an odd match for high-powered athletics.But such marriages were those of convenience. That teacher told of taking a class with one of the football players. At exam time one fine spring day, the player positioned himself next to an open window and proceeded to hand his test paper out the window where some unseen person filled in the answers.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | February 3, 1991
It's often difficult to separate myth from reality in pro football's distant past.Red Grange proved that.When he died last week, most of the obituaries noted that he helped popularize pro football in a tour he made with the Chicago Bears in 1925 after his senior season at the University of Illinois.The facts are somewhat different.A book published last fall by Washington writers Dan Daly and Bob O'Donnell titled, "The Pro Football Chronicle," pointed out the reality of the tour doesn't quite match the the myth, and that Grange's pro career wasn't as storied as his college career.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | February 3, 1991
The night Red Grange died, one of the cable channels ran a documentary about Jack Dempsey, another of the heroes who made the 1920's the "golden age of sport."It showed grainy black-and-white film of man-to-man combat between Dempsey and boxers like Georges Carpentier and Luis Firpo. On a nearby channel, four-star generals were offering what looked like Nintendo games as news about life-and-death combat in the golden age of television.To re-create the flavor of the Twenties, the Dempsey documentary flashed action photos of Babe Ruth, Bobby Jones and indeed Red Grange -- whom it identified as the quarterback in the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | February 1, 1991
FOOTBALL WAS a sport back in the Roaring '20s, not yet an industry, and a 5-foot-10, 180-pound halfback was considered good-sized. Of course he seemed a lot smaller if you were trying to catch him. Grantland Rice, an immortal in a different field, summed up the way this haunt ran:"A streak of fire, a breath of flame. Eluding all who reach and clutch. A gray ghost thrown into the game. A rubber bounding, blasting soul. Whose destination is the goal. Red Grange of Illinois." They ran like that in the '20s and, perhaps of equal aesthetic interest, they wrote like that -- and could get away with it. It must have been the influence of radio, and its legitimization of short, staccato bursts of verse.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 30, 1991
Red Grange just would not say the words."Naw, naw," he kept telling me. "Aww, naw."C'mon Red, say it. We all know it's true. So just say it."Nope, not me," he said. "Uh-uh."So I said it for him: Red Grange made pro football. If it weren't for what he did more than six decades ago, we would have no choice but to spend our Sundays watching men in pastel sweaters holding thin sticks and hitting dimpled white balls into little holes.Back in 1925, no Goodyear blimps floated over huge crowds packed into gargantuan football stadiums.
SPORTS
By Gerald Eskenazi and Gerald Eskenazi,New York Times News Service | January 29, 1991
Harold "Red" Grange, whose dramatic exploits as a football running back for the University of Illinois and the Chicago Bears more than 60 years ago made him an idol of his age and a legend to later generations, died yesterday at Lake Wales (Fla.) Hospital. He was 87.His wife of 49 years, Margaret, who is his only survivor, said Grange's death was due to complications from pneumonia. He had been hospitalized since July.With his flaming hair and his many notable achievements on the football field -- some so spectacular they still read like fiction -- RedGrange fit easily into that group of superstars that helped elevate the 1920s into a golden age of sports in the United States.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 29, 1991
INDIAN LAKE ESTATES, Fla. -- From the "Golden Age of Sport," born of the "Roaring '20s," five personalities transcended all others: Babe Ruth in baseball, Jack Dempsey in boxing, Bill Tilden in tennis, Bobby Jones in golf and Red Grange in football. Now the last one has left us.Harold "Red" Grange, 87, died yesterday of complications from pneumonia. He had been hospitalized since July.As often happens with undefined mortality, a reporter was to have visited him last Friday at 3 p.m. His wife, Margaret or, as he called her, "Muggs," suggested, "I don't think it's a good idea.
SPORTS
December 10, 1999
The top 10 basketball players of the century as selected by a panel of experts for the Associated Press (listed in order of voting).No. 1 -- Michael Jordan: Six-time NBA champion with the Chicago Bulls who holds the NBA career record with 10 scoring titles. Named NBA MVP five times and won 1985 Rookie of the Year Award.Remaining top 10: Oscar Robertson, Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Elgin Baylor, Jerry West, Julius Erving.Voting panel: Lenny Wilkens, winningest coach in NBA history, nine-time All-Star; Bill Russell, Hall of Fame center, 11-time champion with the Boston Celtics; Chick Hearn, longtime play-by-play broadcaster for the Lakers; Fuzzy Levane, veteran scout for the Knicks; Harvey Pollack, longtime statistician for the 76ers; Marv Albert, in 32nd season calling NBA games.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
Art Modell was a hero in Baltimore, and for good reason. But Baltimore has known him mostly as an elderly man. I was fortunate enough to be in the company of the young Art Modell , when he first became owner of the Browns. I was a football writer for the Pensacola, Fla. News-Journal 50 or so years ago. I covered the Senior Bowl each year back then when it was a struggling enterprise trying to get national recognition. In the course of that, I came to know the two guys who used to do the broadcast for the Senior Bowl - Red Grange and Steve Owen, who had been coach of the New York Giants.
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