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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
If you think you've seen more red foxes in the county than usual, you're probably right. The little bushy-tailed critters are enjoying life in Harford and nearby counties, judging from reports suggesting an increase in population. "We have a tremendous amount of fox here, and they have gotten rid of all the small game, like rabbits, pheasant and quail," said Robert Tibbs, who has a beef cattle farm in the Level area. Red fox sightings rose by a third in the region that includes Harford and neighboring counties, according to the most recent available state survey of bowhunters.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Dickie Small grew up fox hunting with his family in Baltimore County, and the veteran horse trainer has occasionally seen the skittish red or gray creatures running around various tracks over the years. So the sight of a red fox at Pimlico Race Course early one morning last month did not make Small blink. The difference with this fox became quickly apparent — it kept coming out of its den, almost on a daily basis. "If it rains, it stays in," Small said Friday. "And sometimes it oversleeps.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Grace George thought it was cute the way the four red foxes would frolic on her lawn in Timonium - but the cuteness wore thin when they started lounging around her pool. The next thing she knew, they were sunning themselves next to her rhododendron bush in the afternoon. Then they started leaving the half-eaten carcasses of birds and squirrels in the driveways of George and her neighbors. And droppings on their front porches. "It's not cute anymore," the 75-year-old retired teacher says.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
If you think you've seen more red foxes in the county than usual, you're probably right. The little bushy-tailed critters are enjoying life in Baltimore County and nearby areas, judging from reports suggesting an increase in population. "There are foxes everywhere," said Les Richardson, president of the Baltimore County Farm Bureau. "There are no more bunny rabbits - the foxes and coyotes keep them all harvested. Also, they're taking a toll on wild ducks." The number of red fox sightings rose by a third in the region that includes Baltimore and neighboring counties, according to the most recent available state survey of bowhunters.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
A RED FOX sunning itself in the backyard may be an interesting wildlife experience for suburbanites, but the animal could also be infected with rabies. So, too, could raccoons raiding the bird feeder for a nighttime snack, or the skunk digging in a porchside flower bed. These unexpected animal incursions should remind people of the importance of keeping a cautious distance -- and remind pet owners to make sure their dogs and cats get up-to-date rabies vaccinations. A bite from a diseased wild animal is fatal for an unvaccinated pet; the rabies virus rapidly attacks the nervous system.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
With the forensic evidence pointing away from their initial suspect - a bobcat - authorities at the National Zoological Park are on the lookout for a cunning red fox, sought in connection with the July 2 murder of Captain, the bald eagle. Scented lures, traps baited with fish and "camera traps" equipped with heat and motion sensors have been deployed to identify or capture the culprit. If caught, zoo officials say, the fox will probably face a ride into exile in the custody of National Park Service rangers.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 18, 1992
The other morning, two hours before dawn, my cab was charging through the darkness on Belair Road a few blocks north of Erdman Avenue. At that hour, when only the milkman and baker are up, a graceful animal darted across the street.It was a gray fox. Wildlife sightings like this one just aren't supposed to happen well within Baltimore.Few dogs could catch up with this speeding beauty. Its tail floated straight out. The scene could have been from an old print. Only the hunters and their horses were missing.
NEWS
By DON C. FORESTER | February 6, 1991
For reasons known only to the gods, Mother Nature failed to exercise her seasonal option this year. The autumnal equinox had come and gone, and for the first time in recent memory, Jack Frost neglected to decorate the rolling hills adjacent to my Fallston home with their traditional mantle of crimson and yellow. The warm, pallid days of Indian summer persisted into late November, at which time they suddenly and without warning gave way to cold, blustery days and frigid nights.It was during this climatological transition that I first became aware of the fox. Each day, during the fading light of late afternoon, he sat at the crest of the hill overlooking our house nestled at the bottom of Frog Hollow.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Dickie Small grew up fox hunting with his family in Baltimore County, and the veteran horse trainer has occasionally seen the skittish red or gray creatures running around various tracks over the years. So the sight of a red fox at Pimlico Race Course early one morning last month did not make Small blink. The difference with this fox became quickly apparent — it kept coming out of its den, almost on a daily basis. "If it rains, it stays in," Small said Friday. "And sometimes it oversleeps.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | February 28, 1993
At a local sportsmen's club meeting last month, a couple of fellows got into a conversation about fox hunting, a subject that interests me.Back in my salad days, I considered myself quite a fox hunter and just happened to be growing up in an area that overflowed XTC with red foxes. One year, I managed to call enough into .22-rifle range to finance the purchase of my first quality shotgun.Anyway, 10 minutes or so into this discussion, the gentleman at my right elbow said, "Well, we may be knee deep in foxes right now, but I'll bet that 10 years from now, after the coyotes establish themselves around these parts, a red fox will be a rare sight."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 6, 2006
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Despite 21 points from Brittany Dunn, Loyola could not overcome a strong first-half shooting performance by Marist as the Red Foxes earned an NCAA bid with a 68-57 victory in the women's Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference tournament title game at Pepsi Arena yesterday. Dunn, who was named to the all-tournament team, made eight of 15 shots from the field and all three free throws in leading Loyola's second-half comeback. Marist (23-6) led by 16 at halftime and by 26 at one point in the second half, but the Greyhounds rallied to cut the deficit to 61-57 on a jumper by senior Jackie Valderas with 2:03 remaining.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
With the forensic evidence pointing away from their initial suspect - a bobcat - authorities at the National Zoological Park are on the lookout for a cunning red fox, sought in connection with the July 2 murder of Captain, the bald eagle. Scented lures, traps baited with fish and "camera traps" equipped with heat and motion sensors have been deployed to identify or capture the culprit. If caught, zoo officials say, the fox will probably face a ride into exile in the custody of National Park Service rangers.
NEWS
By Matthew Brown and Matthew Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Jim DeStephano worked his way down a trash-strewn creek in Lodi, N.J., stopping every few paces to peer into the shallow water. On one side of the creek was a public housing project. On the other, a packed row of houses. But to DeStephano, this was prime wild muskrat country. And it was time to check his trap line. The first few spring-loaded devices were empty. But as DeStephano came under a small bridge, a dead muskrat sagged in the water, a small steel trap clamped around its neck.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
A RED FOX sunning itself in the backyard may be an interesting wildlife experience for suburbanites, but the animal could also be infected with rabies. So, too, could raccoons raiding the bird feeder for a nighttime snack, or the skunk digging in a porchside flower bed. These unexpected animal incursions should remind people of the importance of keeping a cautious distance -- and remind pet owners to make sure their dogs and cats get up-to-date rabies vaccinations. A bite from a diseased wild animal is fatal for an unvaccinated pet; the rabies virus rapidly attacks the nervous system.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Grace George thought it was cute the way the four red foxes would frolic on her lawn in Timonium - but the cuteness wore thin when they started lounging around her pool. The next thing she knew, they were sunning themselves next to her rhododendron bush in the afternoon. Then they started leaving the half-eaten carcasses of birds and squirrels in the driveways of George and her neighbors. And droppings on their front porches. "It's not cute anymore," the 75-year-old retired teacher says.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | November 25, 1993
Havre de Grace.--Almost 20 years ago, I bought a piece of farmland that abuts what I think of as the back side of our place. From a farming standpoint it was not an especially good buy.It's a pretty tract, about half of it tillable, and close by if you're on foot or happen to have a helicopter. The trouble is, it lies on the far side of a creek and a very hilly patch of woods. To reach it with most farm machinery from our barn requires a roundabout trip of about 2 miles on county roads.It was much more accessible to a neighbor, and as he was looking for more land to farm I decided to rent it to him until I figured out a better use for it. He's still farming it today, and has been a good steward; it looks much better than it did when I bought it. I get over to it as often as I can, but a recent event forcefully suggested to me that that might not have been often enough.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | November 25, 1993
Havre de Grace.--Almost 20 years ago, I bought a piece of farmland that abuts what I think of as the back side of our place. From a farming standpoint it was not an especially good buy.It's a pretty tract, about half of it tillable, and close by if you're on foot or happen to have a helicopter. The trouble is, it lies on the far side of a creek and a very hilly patch of woods. To reach it with most farm machinery from our barn requires a roundabout trip of about 2 miles on county roads.It was much more accessible to a neighbor, and as he was looking for more land to farm I decided to rent it to him until I figured out a better use for it. He's still farming it today, and has been a good steward; it looks much better than it did when I bought it. I get over to it as often as I can, but a recent event forcefully suggested to me that that might not have been often enough.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | February 28, 1993
At a local sportsmen's club meeting last month, a couple of fellows got into a conversation about fox hunting, a subject that interests me.Back in my salad days, I considered myself quite a fox hunter and just happened to be growing up in an area that overflowed XTC with red foxes. One year, I managed to call enough into .22-rifle range to finance the purchase of my first quality shotgun.Anyway, 10 minutes or so into this discussion, the gentleman at my right elbow said, "Well, we may be knee deep in foxes right now, but I'll bet that 10 years from now, after the coyotes establish themselves around these parts, a red fox will be a rare sight."
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