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November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
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EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 3, 2011
Heartier dishes are called for as we ease into the chilly season. Ergo, we tend to plan side dishes, as well as meat preparations, designed to warm the family cockles. Root vegetables come to mind. But leafy vegetables can play a big part in menu planning too. Where in summer we purchase heads and heads of lettuce to use in all manner of cooling salads, in fall and winter, we tend to use other "heads" to create heartier fare. We're speaking specifically of cabbage. Did you know that there are at least five different kinds of cabbage?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Don Schline, a senior sales advisor with Mackenzie Commercial Real Estate in Baltimore, and his buddies really know how to throw a tailgate party. The core group of 15, organized and motivated by their friend Scott McClure, are all friends from their high schools days. The group has been tailgating together in Lot H1 at M&T stadium at every home game, rain or shine, since the Ravens played their first game there. They are united by their passion for their hometown team and their love of good food.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
BENEDICT -- Irving Chappelear hauled a basket teeming with green eels and oozing slime out of the Patuxent River and onto the dock in this small town in Southern Maryland. As the writhing, snakelike bodies twisted against each other, the suction made a soft squeaking noise that sounded like faint cries. The song of the American eel has been fading for Chappelear and other watermen since the 1970s. Eel populations have dwindled as their rivers have been blocked by dams and muddied by pollution.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 4, 2004
During the cold snowy days of winter, nothing is more satisfying than comfort food. Familiar, unpretentious fare, it consoles when the thermometer plunges and the landscape turns white. Roast chicken, pot roast with rich dark gravy, smothered pork chops, macaroni and cheese, potato gratins, chocolate chip cookies and apple pie are the types of dishes I long for and find myself preparing for my family and for company. In the winter, I often invite people for supper rather than for dinner -- the former conjuring up an image of a simple, satisfying meal and the latter denoting a more formal repast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
I grew up in Arizona and Mexican food has been a big part of my life and culture. I loved eating homemade tamales that someone had lovingly labored over for hours, or my mom’s enchiladas with green sauce.  I can’t miss a Cinco de Mayo, so I’ve cooked up some of my favorites just in time for a celebration. Try them out or get inspired in time for Thursday!   Grilled Fish Tacos 1 lb firm white fish Sea salt Black pepper Chili powder Olive oil 8 small tortillas Prepare grill.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2011
The nights come on earlier. The furnace clicks on. On a humid afternoon, the deep, resonant bell at City Hall sounds the time. It's sour beef's high hour in Baltimore. In the next week, the aged beef from Hickory Chance Farm in Bel Air will be delivered to Zion Lutheran Church in City Hall Plaza, Lexington and Holliday streets in downtown Baltimore. An army of Zion kitchen volunteers will then begin their labors, days at a time. There's the trimming the beef, the marinating, the tubs of flour and riced potatoes.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | September 30, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal, and an entertaining menu. SUNDAY / Family Your own roast turkey or turkey breast is the center of the family feast today. Prepare lots of mashed potatoes and make or buy gravy. Serve with Sauteed Red Cabbage and dinner rolls. For dessert, try pineapple sherbet.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1997
A spaghetti sauce made with tomato juice and a sweet and sour red cabbage are the orders of the day.Louis Evans of Baltimore requested the spaghetti-sauce recipe. "I remember it at an elementary school dinner, and it was delicious," he writes. Beverly Clark of Weedsport, N.Y., supplied the recipe.Rachelann Plucker of Sioux Falls, S.D., requested a recipe for sweet and sour cabbage. The recipe chosen was from Lynn Stiegler of Beaverbrook. Other responses came from Betsy Hedeman of Relay, Eloise DeLong of Baltimore and Pam Sievertsen of Walla Walla, Wash.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 3, 2011
Heartier dishes are called for as we ease into the chilly season. Ergo, we tend to plan side dishes, as well as meat preparations, designed to warm the family cockles. Root vegetables come to mind. But leafy vegetables can play a big part in menu planning too. Where in summer we purchase heads and heads of lettuce to use in all manner of cooling salads, in fall and winter, we tend to use other "heads" to create heartier fare. We're speaking specifically of cabbage. Did you know that there are at least five different kinds of cabbage?
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2011
The nights come on earlier. The furnace clicks on. On a humid afternoon, the deep, resonant bell at City Hall sounds the time. It's sour beef's high hour in Baltimore. In the next week, the aged beef from Hickory Chance Farm in Bel Air will be delivered to Zion Lutheran Church in City Hall Plaza, Lexington and Holliday streets in downtown Baltimore. An army of Zion kitchen volunteers will then begin their labors, days at a time. There's the trimming the beef, the marinating, the tubs of flour and riced potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
I grew up in Arizona and Mexican food has been a big part of my life and culture. I loved eating homemade tamales that someone had lovingly labored over for hours, or my mom’s enchiladas with green sauce.  I can’t miss a Cinco de Mayo, so I’ve cooked up some of my favorites just in time for a celebration. Try them out or get inspired in time for Thursday!   Grilled Fish Tacos 1 lb firm white fish Sea salt Black pepper Chili powder Olive oil 8 small tortillas Prepare grill.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
BENEDICT -- Irving Chappelear hauled a basket teeming with green eels and oozing slime out of the Patuxent River and onto the dock in this small town in Southern Maryland. As the writhing, snakelike bodies twisted against each other, the suction made a soft squeaking noise that sounded like faint cries. The song of the American eel has been fading for Chappelear and other watermen since the 1970s. Eel populations have dwindled as their rivers have been blocked by dams and muddied by pollution.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 4, 2004
During the cold snowy days of winter, nothing is more satisfying than comfort food. Familiar, unpretentious fare, it consoles when the thermometer plunges and the landscape turns white. Roast chicken, pot roast with rich dark gravy, smothered pork chops, macaroni and cheese, potato gratins, chocolate chip cookies and apple pie are the types of dishes I long for and find myself preparing for my family and for company. In the winter, I often invite people for supper rather than for dinner -- the former conjuring up an image of a simple, satisfying meal and the latter denoting a more formal repast.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 30, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Your own roast chicken and gravy always make the family happy, especially when you add your mashed potatoes. Try a different side dish, Red Cabbage, today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Don Schline, a senior sales advisor with Mackenzie Commercial Real Estate in Baltimore, and his buddies really know how to throw a tailgate party. The core group of 15, organized and motivated by their friend Scott McClure, are all friends from their high schools days. The group has been tailgating together in Lot H1 at M&T stadium at every home game, rain or shine, since the Ravens played their first game there. They are united by their passion for their hometown team and their love of good food.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1997
A spaghetti sauce made with tomato juice and a sweet and sour red cabbage are the orders of the day.Louis Evans of Baltimore requested the spaghetti-sauce recipe. "I remember it at an elementary school dinner, and it was delicious," he writes. Beverly Clark of Weedsport, N.Y., supplied the recipe.Rachelann Plucker of Sioux Falls, S.D., requested a recipe for sweet and sour cabbage. The recipe chosen was from Lynn Stiegler of Beaverbrook. Other responses came from Betsy Hedeman of Relay, Eloise DeLong of Baltimore and Pam Sievertsen of Walla Walla, Wash.
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