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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
ELMONT, N.Y. - The racing world gasped and then slipped into sadness last week, when Point Given was retired with a tendon injury. The powerful, unpredictable chestnut had become the sport's standard-bearer. In his final two races, the Haskell at Monmouth Park and the Travers at Saratoga, he drew record crowds and stirred emotions. Victories later this year against older horses and next year against international competition would have stamped Point Given as one of racing's all-time greats.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Most of the horses in the stakes barns at Pimlico Race Course had cleared out by 8:30 Sunday morning, having loaded into vans under the cover of early-morning rain. Plates with pieces of cake left over from last night's victory party for Oxbow dotted the ground near trainer D. Wayne Lukas' temporary office, as did a few emptied beer bottles. As he said he would, Lukas began loading his horses into a van bound for Louisville less than 12 hours after winning his 14th Triple Crown race, a new record.
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By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 21, 2000
If you listen to history, history whispers that 11 have prevailed - only 11. Fusaichi Pegasus will not join the all-star roster of Sir Barton, Gallant Fox, Omaha, War Admiral, Whirlaway, Count Fleet, Assault, Citation, Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed.Those 11 swept the three races that make up the Triple Crown . Fusaichi Pegasus, the "next great horse," failed yesterday in the second, the 125th Preakness before 98,304 damp and chilly fans at Pimlico Race Course . After winning the Kentucky Derby as if he might be the next Secretariat, Fusaichi Pegasus struggled to finish second in the Preakness as the heaviest favorite since Spectacular Bid in 1979.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Frank Stronach, Pimlico's owner and a successful breeder, wants to bring horse ownership to the masses — by selling stock in six new racehorse investment companies. For $10 a share, investors could own a piece of thoroughbreds that would be trained and raced around the country before they are sold off, according to documents filed for the initial public stock offerings. The companies — named after Stronach's winning horses, including 2000 Preakness champ Red Bullet — are trying to raise a total of about $24 million.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2000
Before making a few $2 wagers in today's Belmont Stakes, here's my two cents about what happened in the Preakness. Fusaichi Pegasus certainly did not run his best race. He never reached top gear while appearing to spin his wheels on the wet Pimlico racing surface. This was quite unlike the smooth-moving "Fusaichi," who handily defeated Red Bullet over a slippery Aqueduct racing surface in the Wood Memorial on April 15. Nor did "Fusaichi" resemble the powerful horse who convincingly won the Kentucky Derby.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
A horse named Red Bullet shot out of the pack in the stretch to win the 125th Preakness Stakes yesterday, ending the Triple Crown hopes of Kentucky Derby winner Fusaichi Pegasus. The upset didn't dampen festivities at a spruced-up Pimlico Race Course, as an estimated 98,304 people - only slightly smaller than last year's record crowd of more than 100,000 - braved drizzle and a temperature in the 60s to attend Maryland's premier racing event "It's like a big tailgate party," said Sid Schenning of Bel Air, as he waited to bet on his first Preakness from the indoor comfort of the Grandstand.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
NEW YORK -- The scene remains vivid: Two gutsy horses, finally freed of trouble, exploding down the stretch at Aqueduct in a scintillating sprint to the wire. Red Bullet and Aptitude stamped that vision into memory in the Gotham Stakes three weeks ago at Aqueduct. Red Bullet remained undefeated, and the surging Aptitude finished a half-length behind in one of the most inspiring skirmishes on this year's Triple Crown trail. Tomorrow, those two and 10 others, including Jinny Vance's Postponed, will compete in the $750,000 Wood Memorial Stakes at Aqueduct.
SPORTS
May 20, 2000
The 10th Race The Preakness Stakes WHO SHOULD WIN The Preakness is all about figuring out who will run second. Fusaichi Pegasus appears invincible. Red Bullet will be the crowd's choice -- and he is a deserving one -- but High Yield may be the better bet. He's had only two bad races in his career and both were at Churchill Downs, home of the Kentucky Derby. He figures to love Pimlico and is the kind of horse who might bounce back from a poor Derby to run well here. Captain Steve is another who had trouble in Kentucky -- he was bumped badly in the stretch -- and may run better today.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2000
The winner of the Kentucky Derby and the winner of the Preakness may - or may not - meet again June10 in the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park. The trainers of Red Bullet, who won Saturday's Preakness, and Fusaichi Pegasus, winner of the Derby, said yesterday that their colts would run in the Belmont only if they're thriving. Otherwise, they said, they'll wait for 3-year-old stakes later in the year.`This horse was perfect for this race," said Joe Orseno, trainer of Red Bullet, referring to the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
Red Bullet's Preakness win over Fusaichi Pegasus was a surprise to most, but not to jockey Jerry Bailey, who sensed there was something special about the horse the first time he mounted him. "He was a very talented colt," Bailey, 42, said. "I really had no doubt that he would win the Gotham." And he did win that race in March, although Bailey was not the man guiding him. Bailey had won in February on Red Bullet, but due to scheduling conficts and agent troubles, he was not aboard the colt in his next two races, the Gotham and the Wood Memorial, in which Red Bullet finished second to Fusaichi Pegasus.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
ELMONT, N.Y. - The racing world gasped and then slipped into sadness last week, when Point Given was retired with a tendon injury. The powerful, unpredictable chestnut had become the sport's standard-bearer. In his final two races, the Haskell at Monmouth Park and the Travers at Saratoga, he drew record crowds and stirred emotions. Victories later this year against older horses and next year against international competition would have stamped Point Given as one of racing's all-time greats.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2000
Before making a few $2 wagers in today's Belmont Stakes, here's my two cents about what happened in the Preakness. Fusaichi Pegasus certainly did not run his best race. He never reached top gear while appearing to spin his wheels on the wet Pimlico racing surface. This was quite unlike the smooth-moving "Fusaichi," who handily defeated Red Bullet over a slippery Aqueduct racing surface in the Wood Memorial on April 15. Nor did "Fusaichi" resemble the powerful horse who convincingly won the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2000
ELMONT, N.Y. - The rubber match between Fusaichi Pegasus, winner of the Kentucky Derby, and Red Bullet, winner of the Preakness, was scratched yesterday when the owner of Red Bullet withdrew his colt from consideration for the Belmont Stakes. The horse's owner, Frank Stronach, decided that the Belmont would be too punishing for Red Bullet three weeks after he outran Fusaichi Pegasus in the Preakness. They will almost certainly meet later, but it will not be in New York on June 10. "We don't want to squeeze the lemon dry," said Joe Orseno, who trains Red Bullet.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2000
The winner of the Kentucky Derby and the winner of the Preakness may - or may not - meet again June10 in the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park. The trainers of Red Bullet, who won Saturday's Preakness, and Fusaichi Pegasus, winner of the Derby, said yesterday that their colts would run in the Belmont only if they're thriving. Otherwise, they said, they'll wait for 3-year-old stakes later in the year.`This horse was perfect for this race," said Joe Orseno, trainer of Red Bullet, referring to the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
Red Bullet's Preakness win over Fusaichi Pegasus was a surprise to most, but not to jockey Jerry Bailey, who sensed there was something special about the horse the first time he mounted him. "He was a very talented colt," Bailey, 42, said. "I really had no doubt that he would win the Gotham." And he did win that race in March, although Bailey was not the man guiding him. Bailey had won in February on Red Bullet, but due to scheduling conficts and agent troubles, he was not aboard the colt in his next two races, the Gotham and the Wood Memorial, in which Red Bullet finished second to Fusaichi Pegasus.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
The "Bullet" fired and shot down the latest candidate for the label "superhorse." For five weeks, Red Bullet was pointed toward the rematch with Fusaichi Pegasus, who had beaten him by 4 1/4 lengths in the Wood Memorial on April 15 at Aqueduct. Red Bullet's ownership reluctantly passed on the temptation to compete in the Kentucky Derby, thereby avoiding all the shipping, the commotion and the cavalry charge in the race itself that can drain a horse with the Preakness only two weeks away.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
Their hearts said, "Let's go to the Kentucky Derby," but their minds contradicted them. When the members of the Stronach Stable team talked over Red Bullet's future itinerary after he finished second to Fusaichi Pegasus in the Wood Memorial, the consensus was to skip Churchill Downs and try the Preakness. "The extra rest is definitely a positive," trainer Joe Orseno said yesterday after Red Bullet galloped two miles over the Pimlico track with exercise rider Keith Ricks aboard. "He filled out a little bit and it helped him mentally and physically.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Kent Baker and Tom Keyser and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
When it became clear that Fusaichi Pegasus was not going to keep up with Red Bullet, the question turned to whether he could hold off the explosive late charge of Impeachment. He did, but barely. Ridden by Craig Perret, Impeachment came within a head of overcoming the Kentucky Derby winner. Impeachment also finished third in the Derby, courtesy of the same late burst of speed."We had a good trip, but it turned out he was just the third best horse," Perret said. "One of these days the big guys are going to stub their toes and Impeachment is going to win a very significant race.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 21, 2000
Neil Drysdale blamed the condition of the track, which was a lot easier than blaming the possibility that one workout between the Kentucky Derby and Preakness just wasn't enough or the fact that the horse had spent three days before the Preakness in virtual isolation, in a concrete barn on the east side of Pimlico. "He couldn't handle the track. That's the way I saw it. That's the way Kent [Desormeaux, the jockey] saw it," said Drysdale, trainer of Fusaichi Pegasus, who finished a badly beaten second to Red Bullet as the biggest Preakness favorite in 21 years yesterday.
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