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NEWS
October 26, 2009
People of all ages, from newborns to the elderly, may experience anemia - the lack of healthy red blood cells in the body - at some point in their lives. It is estimated that there are 3.5 million people in the United States who have anemia. Dr. Meyer R. Heyman, a hematologist who directs the Center for Blood Disorders at St. Agnes Hospital, discusses the condition. * Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body; therefore, those with anemia do not get sufficient oxygen-rich blood.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
A substitute for blood that could be used in transfusions without risk of hepatitis or HIV infection could be available within five years, a federal scientist predicted yesterday."
NEWS
October 26, 2009
People of all ages, from newborns to the elderly, may experience anemia - the lack of healthy red blood cells in the body - at some point in their lives. It is estimated that there are 3.5 million people in the United States who have anemia. Dr. Meyer R. Heyman, a hematologist who directs the Center for Blood Disorders at St. Agnes Hospital, discusses the condition. * Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body; therefore, those with anemia do not get sufficient oxygen-rich blood.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - High blood pressure in the lungs has been identified as a major risk factor for death in adults with sickle cell disease, and all patients with the disease should be screened for it, according to a study to be published today. Almost one-third of adult sickle cell patients who were screened with ultrasound were found to have moderate to severe high blood pressure in the lungs that had not previously been detected, the study found. The results from the tests confirm earlier suggestions from studies of patient records that pulmonary hypertension is present in 20 percent to 40 percent of sickle cell patients and poses a major threat of death, the researchers said in their paper, which appears in The New England Journal of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine and Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | November 5, 2006
Lester Gregory, slender and serious, sat expressionless on a hospital gurney, two long tubes extending into each of the 15-year-old's lean arms. Where a needle pierced the soft inside of his right elbow, fresh whole blood coursed into Gregory's veins - oxygen-rich blood that would stave off anemia and invigorate him. From his left arm, clumpy, sickle-celled blood flowed into a large bag to be discarded.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
Only Dr. Samuel Charache knows precisely where to place the needle. He can't put it in the arms of his sickle cell patients. Long ago, their veins collapsed, punctured too many times.To draw blood from John Paul, Dr. Charache deftly locates the place on the man's right index finger -- on the knuckle. To draw blood from William Thorn Jr., the doctor pierces the outside of his thumb.Dr. Charache, 65, knows these two patients almost as well as family. Out of this close relationship -- 28 years in Mr. Paul's case -- has grown a research effort that culminated last week in the announcement of an effective treatment for severe sickle cell anemia.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Fifteen months ago, the pain from Pamela Newton's sickle cell disease was excruciating. She spent more time in the hospital than in her Capitol Heights apartment. She was on 15 pain pills a day, all heavy narcotics. She was bleeding regularly and needed daily transfusions of platelets. She had just months to live. Today, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital say that Newton is one of the first adults in the world to be cured of sickle cell disease - and the first using an experimental bone marrow transplant that could cure thousands like her who have been told they will never get better.
NEWS
By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Fifteen months ago, the pain from Pamela Newton's sickle cell disease was excruciating. She spent more time in the hospital than in her Capitol Heights apartment. She was on 15 pain pills a day, all heavy narcotics. She was bleeding regularly and needed daily transfusions of platelets. She had just months to live. Today, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital say that Newton is one of the first adults in the world to be cured of sickle cell disease - and the first using an experimental bone marrow transplant that could cure thousands like her who have been told they will never get better.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine and Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | November 5, 2006
Lester Gregory, slender and serious, sat expressionless on a hospital gurney, two long tubes extending into each of the 15-year-old's lean arms. Where a needle pierced the soft inside of his right elbow, fresh whole blood coursed into Gregory's veins - oxygen-rich blood that would stave off anemia and invigorate him. From his left arm, clumpy, sickle-celled blood flowed into a large bag to be discarded.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - High blood pressure in the lungs has been identified as a major risk factor for death in adults with sickle cell disease, and all patients with the disease should be screened for it, according to a study to be published today. Almost one-third of adult sickle cell patients who were screened with ultrasound were found to have moderate to severe high blood pressure in the lungs that had not previously been detected, the study found. The results from the tests confirm earlier suggestions from studies of patient records that pulmonary hypertension is present in 20 percent to 40 percent of sickle cell patients and poses a major threat of death, the researchers said in their paper, which appears in The New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
Only Dr. Samuel Charache knows precisely where to place the needle. He can't put it in the arms of his sickle cell patients. Long ago, their veins collapsed, punctured too many times.To draw blood from John Paul, Dr. Charache deftly locates the place on the man's right index finger -- on the knuckle. To draw blood from William Thorn Jr., the doctor pierces the outside of his thumb.Dr. Charache, 65, knows these two patients almost as well as family. Out of this close relationship -- 28 years in Mr. Paul's case -- has grown a research effort that culminated last week in the announcement of an effective treatment for severe sickle cell anemia.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
A substitute for blood that could be used in transfusions without risk of hepatitis or HIV infection could be available within five years, a federal scientist predicted yesterday."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | May 28, 1991
Some bodybuilding magazines urge readers to eat high-protein foods and take special vitamin and mineral supplements in order to give them gorgeous physiques that will make them champion bodybuilders.But that won't work. Champion bodybuilders are born, not made. Genetic factors are what determine whether or not you have the potential to become a top bodybuilder. The best bodybuilders have the largest muscles and the least body fat.Muscles attach to bones via tendons, and the potential for having large muscles comes from having long muscles and short tendons.
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