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By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
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Aegis staff report | July 31, 2013
The American Red Cross and the Cal Ripken Youth Baseball Division are teaming up to host the inaugural Red Cross Day Blood Drive during the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen on Aug.17, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Each donor will receive a coupon for a Free Dunkin' Donuts iced coffee and doughnut, a voucher for one ticket to an upcoming Orioles home game, one reserved seat at the Cal Ripken World Series and will have the opportunity to be included in...
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FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | May 28, 1991
Some bodybuilding magazines urge readers to eat high-protein foods and take special vitamin and mineral supplements in order to give them gorgeous physiques that will make them champion bodybuilders.But that won't work. Champion bodybuilders are born, not made. Genetic factors are what determine whether or not you have the potential to become a top bodybuilder. The best bodybuilders have the largest muscles and the least body fat.Muscles attach to bones via tendons, and the potential for having large muscles comes from having long muscles and short tendons.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
The Town Center Community Association will sponsor a Red Cross blood drive to help meet the crisis in the local blood supply. The drive is scheduled from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 9 in the ballroom at Historic Oakland, 5430 Vantage Point Road. To schedule an appointment: 800-GIVE-LIFE. Pizza party planned for National Night Out Slayton House on Wilde Lake Village Green will hold a pizza party for Wilde Lake residents on National Night Out, a program to promote neighborhood spirit and police-community partnership, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 7. Pizza, soft drinks and a raffle are planned.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1994
Q: For more than a month now I have felt weak and tired, just like 30 years ago when my doctor treated me for iron deficiency anemia in my late twenties. My husband insists on my seeing my doctor for these problems. Why shouldn't I just improve my diet and take iron pills?A: By all means, do as your husband tells you and see your doctor.In the first place, many disorders can cause a feeling of weakness and chronic fatigue. Secondly, there are numerous causes of anemia. Even if your symptoms are caused by iron deficiency anemia, as you suspect, it is most important to determine the cause of the iron deficiency.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
Until this week, medical science held out little hope for victims of sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood disorder that causes organ damage, episodes of extreme pain and premature death. The announcement Monday that researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School have developed the first effective treatment for severe forms of the illness means that sickle cell may one day become a manageable, chronic illness rather than the relentless killer it is today.Between 70,000 and 80,000 people in the United States suffer from the disease.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 14, 1991
"The Gift of Life" has gone on sale in Baltimore.In an effort to stimulate sales, the American Red Cross has entered a price war with blood brokers and is offering hospitals in the Baltimore-Washington area discounts of up to 40 percent on blood.Under the plan, hospitals that buy more red blood cells, plasma or platelets this year than last year will get discounts of 20 percent to 40 percent on the additional pints. Hospitals could save as much as $31.80 a pint by buying more blood.Red Cross officials in Baltimore say that they were forced to adopt the unusual plan because suppliers from Oklahoma and Florida have begun selling blood to area hospitals at prices $33 to $39 a pint less than the Red Cross was charging.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
The Orioles lost a popular member of their family early yesterday morning when Jeff Nelson, the club's video coaching assistant since 1995, died of complications following surgery at Johns Hopkins. He was 25.Nelson helped prepare tapes the Orioles used to review their performances or to prepare for an upcoming pitcher. One of the more common sights at Camden Yards was a player huddled with Nelson in the video room outside the clubhouse checking his at-bats from the previous night's game."Jeff was the man. He had everything you needed," said catcher Lenny Webster.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
In a medical oddity, 9-year-old Kendall Burrows' blood keeps killing itself.Last week, Kendall needed 300 units of blood and blood components to sustain her life. This week, the urgency remains -- both for Kendall and the American Red Cross, which is trying to help her despite being hard-pressed to keep up with demand throughout the region.Kendall suffers from two ailments producing antibodies that attack her own red blood cells and blood platelets."Doctors have to keep the body flushing, making blood exchanges, so the antibodies don't mass produce and overtake her red blood cells," the child's mother, Debi Burrows, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
The Orioles lost a popular member of their family early yesterday morning when Jeff Nelson, the club's video coaching assistant since 1995, died of complications following surgery at Johns Hopkins. He was 25.Nelson helped prepare tapes the Orioles used to review their performances or to prepare for an upcoming pitcher. One of the more common sights at Camden Yards was a player huddled with Nelson in the video room outside the clubhouse checking his at-bats from the previous night's game."Jeff was the man. He had everything you needed," said catcher Lenny Webster.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Your new upper-deck seats at the Ravens' stadium don't just seem close to the stratosphere. They really are.Although stadium designers boast that the park will have sightlines as good as any in football, a number of compromises had to be made to accommodate all the elements the team wanted. The result is an upper deck that is among the highest in sports and tilted at an angle some patrons may find a bit steep.The reason is chiefly luxury seating. The team wanted to have 108 skyboxes and 7,900 club seats.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
In a medical oddity, 9-year-old Kendall Burrows' blood keeps killing itself.Last week, Kendall needed 300 units of blood and blood components to sustain her life. This week, the urgency remains -- both for Kendall and the American Red Cross, which is trying to help her despite being hard-pressed to keep up with demand throughout the region.Kendall suffers from two ailments producing antibodies that attack her own red blood cells and blood platelets."Doctors have to keep the body flushing, making blood exchanges, so the antibodies don't mass produce and overtake her red blood cells," the child's mother, Debi Burrows, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1996
Ellis A. Caplan, a Jewish fellow from Randallstown, and David J. Kovalic, a Catholic from Parkville, call themselves the Blood Brothers and not because they're Internal Revenue Service auditors.Every 56 days or so, they get the urge and phone each other. Mr. Kovalic says, "Ellis, how about it?" Or Mr. Caplan asks, "Dave, you ready?"Off go the IRS men again to give whole blood.O-positive Caplan, 50, has given 107 pints and is working toward his 14th gallon. A-positive Kovalic, 46, is almost a 12-gallon man, having donated 94 pints.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
Until this week, medical science held out little hope for victims of sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood disorder that causes organ damage, episodes of extreme pain and premature death. The announcement Monday that researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School have developed the first effective treatment for severe forms of the illness means that sickle cell may one day become a manageable, chronic illness rather than the relentless killer it is today.Between 70,000 and 80,000 people in the United States suffer from the disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1994
Q: For more than a month now I have felt weak and tired, just like 30 years ago when my doctor treated me for iron deficiency anemia in my late twenties. My husband insists on my seeing my doctor for these problems. Why shouldn't I just improve my diet and take iron pills?A: By all means, do as your husband tells you and see your doctor.In the first place, many disorders can cause a feeling of weakness and chronic fatigue. Secondly, there are numerous causes of anemia. Even if your symptoms are caused by iron deficiency anemia, as you suspect, it is most important to determine the cause of the iron deficiency.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | January 20, 1992
Imagine if there were a good substitute for human blood -- something that would carry life-giving oxygen through the body.An ambulance crew could administer it in emergencies -- something that cannot be done now because the patient's blood must first be typed and cross-matched.A surgery candidate could avoid the ever-present risk of catching acquired immune deficiency syndrome or hepatitis through a blood transfusion.Imagine the benefits for society -- and the profits for the manufacturer and its shareholders.
FEATURES
December 3, 1991
PMS cure doesn't workOil extracted from the evening primrose is probably the most popular "natural" cure for premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It's said to reduce monthly bloating and mood swings by lowering hormone levels, and some women swear by it. The first to ever really test this claim is a group of researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia. Every day for three months, they gave 38 women with PMS either a capsule containing evening primrose oil or a placebo. They then switched the capsules for three additional months.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
NEWS
By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
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