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NEWS
October 7, 1994
Warsaw lay inert under Nazi German occupation in the early summer of 1944. Further east, German armies collapsed and Soviet forces rolled forward. The first Russian tanks reached Polish soil in January. The underground Polish Home Army lay low, awaiting the moment to rise. While the Allies jointly fought Adolf Hitler's Germany, they tugged over Poland's fate.The half-century anniversary of joy at the liberation of Paris on Aug. 25 was inextricably a reminder of the simultaneous agony of Warsaw, and the heroic rising that was willfully let fail.
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NEWS
March 24, 2014
Western governments and specifically the Obama administration have been laughably naive about Russian President Vladimir Putin's reactions and intentions in Crimea and the Ukraine ( "Obama must take stronger measures to confront Putin," March 20). Mr. Putin's empire-building aspirations have now become transparent to the world. A dictator with an occasional perfunctory nod toward reform, one who grew up and came to power in the KGB during the Cold War, he has been unmoved by sanctions and diplomacy.
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NEWS
March 20, 1992
President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision to create a separate Russian Ministry of Defense is the latest acknowledgment of the transitional nature of the Commonwealth of Independent States. In trying to replace the centralized organs of the Soviet Union, the CIS has proven to be quarrelsome and inefficient. Such weaknesses might not be crucial, except that the main functions of the new grouping were to oversee the former Soviet armed forces and control their vast nuclear arsenal. So far, the CIS has not performed either task convincingly.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
The hulking old tanks, left to rust when Soviet forces pulled out of Afghanistan in 1989, still packed a threat when Albert Whittington arrived. Whittington, an ordnance and explosives specialist with the Baltimore district of the Army Corps of Engineers, clambered through dozens of Red Army tanks, trench-digging vehicles, bridge-laying equipment and other derelict machinery at the Pul-e-Charki military base east of Kabul. His mission: Find any unexploded ordnance, unused ammunition and other materials still capable of maiming or killing.
NEWS
By William Safire | December 26, 1990
NOT SINCE Maksim Litvinov, Stalin's commissar for foreign affairs, vainly warned his own leader and the world against appeasing the dictator Hitler has a Soviet diplomat shown the vision of Eduard Shevardnadze in warning of the impending dictatorship of freedom's faithless friend, Mikhail Gorbachev.Consider how this historic admonition reverberates around the globe:rTC In the Soviet Union, people seeking religious toleration or fearful of ethnic persecution are in a panic to escape. Dissidents see the face of Stalin's secret police chief, Lavrenti Beria, in the bland features of Vladimir Kryuchkov of the KGB, who exhumes the politics of paranoia to rail at CIA subversion even in the corn being delivered by the West.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
BERLIN -- When the last trainload of Red Army troops rolled out of Germany last week, the Russians left unanswered a major question: What to do with all the vacated real estate -- 1,026 tracts totaling 667,000 acres, pocked with tumbledown buildings, toxic dumps and many thousands of unexploded artillery shells?Germany was studying this dubious windfall even before the Russians boarded their trains for home. In the past three years, Germany has had to spend $700 million just to keep the ground water safe.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 16, 2001
Early in the Battle of Stalingrad, when it looked as if Hitler's forces would deliver a death blow to the Red Army, a Soviet super-sniper named Vassili Zaitsev - a shepherd from the Urals - calmly began to pick off 242 German soldiers. For a dispirited Soviet citizenry, Vassili became a steppe-spanning symbol of proletariat resistance to fascism and devotion to the motherland. Out of Vassili's exploits, director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his co-writer, Alain Godard, have fashioned "Enemy at the Gates," a magnetic war film.
NEWS
By William Safire | January 15, 1991
THE WINNER of last year's Nobel Peace Prize, the politician who entranced a gullible world with talk of reform and glasnost, the supplicant we have just given a billion dollars in food aid to help keep in office, the Soviet leader supposedly working behind the scenes to cut a deal in the Persian Gulf -- has just ordered his tanks into Lithuania to roll over the bodies of patriots resisting his dictatorship.The timing of the brutal and bloody crackdown is no accident; he knows the focus of world attention is far from the scene of the crime he has long planned.
NEWS
By William Safire | January 18, 1991
ALEKSANDR BESSMERTNYKH came over to me at a reception a couple of years ago, said he heard I'd written a book about Lincoln and our Civil War, and proceeded to cast Mikhail Gorbachev as the Soviet Lincoln -- dedicated to preserving his Union.I suggested this difference: Lincoln believed in human freedom and Gorbachev was trying to perpetuate a system of political slavery.Bessmertnykh, who rolled his eyes at such old thinking, became foreign minister 48 hours after "Bloody Sunday," when Red army tanks killed or injured nearly 400 unarmed Lithuanian patriots.
NEWS
By William Safire | December 13, 1991
REVEALING the true colors of a tyrant, Mikhail Gorbachev now seeks to thwart the democratic will of the independent republics of his former empire by bidding for the support of the veteran Red Army generals.He is responding to the declaration of independence and formation of a commonwealth by Russia, Ukraine and Byelorussia by encouraging what amounts to a military coup.That puts the truth nakedly, but even his remaining apologists in the West cannot escape this fact: He seeks to enlist the power of arms to overrule the decision of elected representatives of the freed peoples.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | March 9, 2009
Maryland Air National Guard cargo crews are prepping for an expected deployment to Afghanistan next year, flying a critical mission of air-dropping supplies to U.S. troops fighting in remote locations. Delivering ammunition, rations and water by parachute from the Guard's C-130J cargo planes is increasingly necessary in Afghanistan, not just because troops are being scattered to small, local bases as part of a new strategy, but also because of the growing danger that ground convoys will be attacked by Taliban insurgents, senior U.S. officers said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Army investigators told Congress yesterday that a far greater number of Iraqi detainees at Baghdad's infamous Abu Ghraib prison - ranging from two dozen to as many as 100 - were hidden from the International Red Cross at the behest of the CIA, and the spy agency refused repeated requests to cooperate with their probe. Before yesterday, Army investigators had said they could identify eight so-called "ghost detainees," who were not registered as required by Army regulations and international law. Both Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Armed Services Committee were sharply critical of the CIA and vowed to further investigate the matter.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Maryland coach Gary Williams often claims to have the best fans in the nation backing his program. But when it comes to a portion of the student fan base that has made its presence known in recent years, especially when archrival Duke visits College Park, Williams has a different opinion. For a number of years, Williams and school officials have blushed at the sight of scores of T-shirts emblazoned with a profanity aimed at the Blue Devils. Three years ago, immediately after a stunning overtime loss to Duke at Cole Field House, the mother of former Blue Devils center Carlos Boozer was struck in the head by a plastic water bottle thrown by a student.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 16, 2001
Early in the Battle of Stalingrad, when it looked as if Hitler's forces would deliver a death blow to the Red Army, a Soviet super-sniper named Vassili Zaitsev - a shepherd from the Urals - calmly began to pick off 242 German soldiers. For a dispirited Soviet citizenry, Vassili became a steppe-spanning symbol of proletariat resistance to fascism and devotion to the motherland. Out of Vassili's exploits, director Jean-Jacques Annaud and his co-writer, Alain Godard, have fashioned "Enemy at the Gates," a magnetic war film.
NEWS
By Bruce Hoffman | August 18, 1998
THE BOMBINGS in East Africa demonstrate again how dangerous a place the world has become for the United States, despite the end of the Cold War and the collapse of communism. The two attacks on U.S. embassies, moreover, underscore an emerging trend in international terrorism: the infliction of mass, indiscriminate casualties by enigmatic adversaries, striking beyond terrorism's traditional theaters in Europe and the Middle East.Above all else, the tragic incidents in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, serve notice that terrorism is -- and will remain -- one of the pre-eminent threats to international security in the 21st century.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
Warsaw lay inert under Nazi German occupation in the early summer of 1944. Further east, German armies collapsed and Soviet forces rolled forward. The first Russian tanks reached Polish soil in January. The underground Polish Home Army lay low, awaiting the moment to rise. While the Allies jointly fought Adolf Hitler's Germany, they tugged over Poland's fate.The half-century anniversary of joy at the liberation of Paris on Aug. 25 was inextricably a reminder of the simultaneous agony of Warsaw, and the heroic rising that was willfully let fail.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Maryland coach Gary Williams often claims to have the best fans in the nation backing his program. But when it comes to a portion of the student fan base that has made its presence known in recent years, especially when archrival Duke visits College Park, Williams has a different opinion. For a number of years, Williams and school officials have blushed at the sight of scores of T-shirts emblazoned with a profanity aimed at the Blue Devils. Three years ago, immediately after a stunning overtime loss to Duke at Cole Field House, the mother of former Blue Devils center Carlos Boozer was struck in the head by a plastic water bottle thrown by a student.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | October 15, 1991
Chaim Shapiro has plenty of stories about his experiences in Europe and the Soviet Union during World War II.One of the stories involves a man named Ludwik Seidenman. Shapiro, a 68-year-old Pikesville resident, says Seidenman saved his life with a compassionate act amid the war's horrors.This weekend, the two will meet at Seidenman's New York home for their first face-to-face encounter in 49 years."It's unbelieveable. It just came out of a blue moon," Shapiro says of the way the two men found each other after five decades.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
BERLIN -- When the last trainload of Red Army troops rolled out of Germany last week, the Russians left unanswered a major question: What to do with all the vacated real estate -- 1,026 tracts totaling 667,000 acres, pocked with tumbledown buildings, toxic dumps and many thousands of unexploded artillery shells?Germany was studying this dubious windfall even before the Russians boarded their trains for home. In the past three years, Germany has had to spend $700 million just to keep the ground water safe.
NEWS
By Eric Frees For and Eric Frees For,The Carroll County Sun | March 29, 1992
Editor's note: Eric Frees, a senior running back at Western MarylandCollege, just returned from a cultural exchange trip to Russia with the school's football team, designed to teach the Russian players about American football. Dawn Frees, Eric's mother, accompanied the teamon the trip. While visiting with the Russian football players, the Ephrata, Pa., native kept this diary of his experiences.FRIDAY, MARCH 13We departed from WMC at 1:30 p.m. aboard two buses, headed for Dulles Airport in Northern Virginia.
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