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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
Howard County residents are recycling more than ever, but the economics of the county's recycling program have grown HTC shaky, according to the county's annual report on recycling released this week.Howard's recycling rate climbed to 32.3 percent in 1996, a record, thanks to a surge in recycling after County Executive Charles I. Ecker imposed a limit of four cans a week on trash collection last summer.But higher costs for recyclables -- combined with lower costs at landfills -- have called the economics of recycling into question.
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NEWS
July 28, 2013
I race sloops with the Potomac River Sailing Association based just across the river from Reagan National Airport, and during every regatta I see bottles and cans floating in the current. This is unacceptable, not only because my skipper is protective of his boat but because the Potomac is one of our most spectacular natural resources and it shouldn't be filled with such litter. Luckily, the Maryland state legislature is considering a bottle bill that puts a 5-cent deposit on all bottles and cans.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Mount Airy, which recycles 40 percent of its trash, has won recognition from the Maryland Recyclers Coalition for "bringing recycling to a small community."Four years ago, the Mount Airy Town Council formed a citizens recycling committee to spearhead community recycling efforts.The committee worked with officials in Frederick and Carroll counties to get drop-off recycling bins placed throughout the town to collect clear and colored glass, aluminum cans and plastic. The town straddles the Frederick-Carroll border.
FEATURES
Laurel Peltier | July 24, 2012
(Tim Wheeler is away this week. The following is a guest post by Laurel Peltier, who publishes the down-to-earth "eco-glancer" www.greenlaurel.com ) Many Marylanders like to think of themselves as pretty green. But are we? If you peeked at curbside recycling rates, you may be surprised to find that we're a lighter shade of green than we thought.  When it comes to recycling, the state Department of the Environment says we're diverting 41 percent of our trash statewide from landfills and incinerators - well above the 34 percent national average, as figured by the Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
Harford environmental officials last week gave the County Council a glowing progress report on recycling efforts in the county, including evidence that the county has exceeded state minimum requirements.Robert Ernst, recycling coordinator, told council members that the county recycled an average 25.36 percent of its waste in 1994. That is 5 percent more than the state requires.The Maryland Recycling Act of 1988 ordered each county with a population of more than 150,000 to develop a plan to reduce its solid waste stream by 20 percent through recycling by the start of last year.
NEWS
September 15, 1993
Carroll's recycling rate climbed to 16 percent in August, up from 13 percent in July, county officials reported yesterday.The county's overall recycling rate for the first eight months of 1993 was 20.3 percent, up from about 17 percent for the first six months, said Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Mr. Curfman credited the high rate to the fact that yard waste is being composted, a form of recycling, instead of being buried with other refuse at Carroll landfills. He also said more businesses have been reporting their recycling efforts to the county.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Counting aluminum cans, plastic, newspapers and othe items recycled in Sykesville, Carroll's recycling rate rose to 11.3 percent in August, up from about 8 percent in July, county officials said.County Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman initially reported last month that the county's recycling rate for August was 10 percent, but he noted that that figure didn't include the towns of Sykesville or Mount Airy."We're pleased to see the figure going up," said Dwight Copenhaver, county recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Carroll County's recycling rate jumped to 14 percent in September, falling just one percentage point short of the state-mandated goal, county officials said yesterday."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Mount Airy, which recycles 40 percent of its trash, has won recognition from the Maryland Recyclers Coalition for "bringing recycling to a small community."Four years ago, the Mount Airy Town Council formed a citizens recycling committee to spearhead community recycling efforts.The committee worked with officials in Frederick and Carroll counties to get drop-off recycling bins placed throughout the town to collect clear and colored glass, aluminum cans and plastic. The town straddles the Frederick-Carroll border.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
Carroll's recycling rate climbed above 17 percent in March, but county officials warned that curbside recycling could become mandatory this year unless efforts improve."
NEWS
May 24, 2009
Baltimore County officials are patting themselves on the back for moving toward single-stream recycling, the radical idea that you could put paper, bottles and cans out at the same time. They say this simplification will add to county residents' already impressive recycling performance - as of the Maryland Department of the Environment's last report, Baltimore County's recycling rate was No. 1 in the state. But in truth, the recycling program in the region's most populous subdivision isn't all it's cracked up to be. For starters, the impressive 62 percent recycling rate has a lot to do with the presence of Bethlehem Steel, which recycles some pretty heavy stuff.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
The Baltimore County Council unanimously adopted a 10-year solid-waste management plan last night that included several recommendations aimed at fostering recycling. The result of a lengthy public participation process, the plan is like "a menu that we can work off of in the next 10 years," said Charles M. Reighart, the county's recycling and waste-prevention manager. The plan suggests transitioning to single-stream recycling for single-family homes and townhouses; creating economic incentives to encourage owners of apartments and condominiums to provide recycling opportunities to residents; and minimizing waste sent to landfills.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2008
On Friday afternoons, a low rumble fills the halls of Parr's Ridge Elementary. The source: large gray trash bins, rolled by a squad of second-graders and parents at the Mount Airy school. The green letters and circle of arrows on their white aprons state their purpose. They are the Green Team, the school's recycling crew, which collects scores of pounds of paper - construction, copy, notebook - each week. Launched last fall, the team has mushroomed from an effort to ensure "we recycle" became a schoolwide practice to one that aims to spread such thinking throughout the district.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Baltimore residents tend to care more than others about the Chesapeake Bay, but recycle household trash less than any other community in the bay's six-state watershed, according to an environmental survey released yesterday. The survey, prepared for the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program office, shows that nearly half of the watershed's 16 million residents do not understand that their daily actions have a direct impact on water quality locally and in the bay. The 64,000-square-mile watershed area includes Maryland, Virginia, Washington, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York and Delaware.
NEWS
By Brenda Buote and Brenda Buote,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
Dented soup cans. Discarded Barbie dolls. An old armchair covered in brown and orange plaid tweed. From a Carroll County trash heap, those unwanted items are among the tons of garbage hauled every day to be burned in a York, Pa., incinerator. After cooking for 30 minutes at 1,800 degrees, the ash is trucked three miles to the "picking line," where workers in blue jeans and hard hats remove barely recognizable coins, costume jewelry and the occasional I-beam - anything that survives the incinerator.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
Howard County residents are recycling more than ever, but the economics of the county's recycling program have grown HTC shaky, according to the county's annual report on recycling released this week.Howard's recycling rate climbed to 32.3 percent in 1996, a record, thanks to a surge in recycling after County Executive Charles I. Ecker imposed a limit of four cans a week on trash collection last summer.But higher costs for recyclables -- combined with lower costs at landfills -- have called the economics of recycling into question.
NEWS
May 16, 1993
Barn fire is arson, fire marshal saysA fire that destroyed a 30-by-60-foot metal pole barn northwest of Manchester last week was declared arson by the state fire marshal's office Friday, said Bob Thomas, chief deputy state fire marshal.The fire, in the 3700 block of Back Woods Road, was discovered shortly after 2 p.m. Tuesday by a neighbor, who said he who saw his cow run through a wire fence as it apparently tried to escape dense smoke from the barn.Farm equipment stored in the barn was destroyed in the blaze, which also scorched a larger barn about 25 feet away and burned some brush across a driveway.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
I race sloops with the Potomac River Sailing Association based just across the river from Reagan National Airport, and during every regatta I see bottles and cans floating in the current. This is unacceptable, not only because my skipper is protective of his boat but because the Potomac is one of our most spectacular natural resources and it shouldn't be filled with such litter. Luckily, the Maryland state legislature is considering a bottle bill that puts a 5-cent deposit on all bottles and cans.
NEWS
April 24, 1997
Recycling rates dropped in Carroll's three northwestern towns last year, a trend reflected throughout the county, according to a county recycling report.New Windsor registered the sharpest drop. Town residents recycled 64 tons of materials in 1996, or 14.75 percent of the waste stream. In 1995, they recycled 66 tons, or 18.8 percent of the total waste collected.In Union Bridge, residents recycled 75 tons of aluminum cans, paper, cardboard and other recyclable materials, or 12.9 percent of total waste collected, compared with 83 tons, or 16.79 percent, the previous year.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
Harford environmental officials last week gave the County Council a glowing progress report on recycling efforts in the county, including evidence that the county has exceeded state minimum requirements.Robert Ernst, recycling coordinator, told council members that the county recycled an average 25.36 percent of its waste in 1994. That is 5 percent more than the state requires.The Maryland Recycling Act of 1988 ordered each county with a population of more than 150,000 to develop a plan to reduce its solid waste stream by 20 percent through recycling by the start of last year.
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