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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
Even as towns across America expand recycling programs to meet the demands of increasingly green-minded residents, Ocean City is going against the wave. Its final pickup of cans, bottles and paper from homes and businesses will be next week. Up to three-quarters of the nation now has access to curbside pickup, according to environmental and government groups. But the tourist town is grappling with another national trend: budget troubles. The move will save Ocean City an estimated $1 million in the 2010-2011 fiscal year.
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NEWS
December 26, 2013
As residents of Baltimore County, we were asked several years ago to participate in the recycling program. We were asked to get separate trash cans and mark them to indicate recycling. The glass and papers are sorted, and I assume the county profits in some way, but most important, these items do not find there way into the landfill. On recycling pickup day, however, I have noticed most of my neighbors do not participate. Maybe the county should reward those who do in the form of a property tax break.
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NEWS
May 19, 1991
Anne Arundel Medical Center implemented a recycling program this week within the Annapolis hospital. Employees selected aluminum cans as the first component of what is expected to be a comprehensive recycling effort. The hospital generates about 1,500 aluminum cans each weekand nearly three tons annually.Environmental Services departmentwill collect cans daily, the Material Management department will deliver cans to the Providence Recycling Center on Spa Road and the Finance department will account for the proceeds.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 27, 2013
The Harford County Department of Parks and Recreation has teamed up with Harford County Public Schools to introduce Recycling is now being done at ballfields and parks across Harford County. After a successful pilot program at specific sites, Harford County Department of Parks and Recreation, with the help of Harford County Public Schools, has distributed 400 recycling cans throughout the county. This initiative will expand single stream recycling to all county parks and school grounds.
NEWS
June 18, 1995
You can help people paint their homes simply by supplying the paint.Bring usable latex paints in labeled, tightly sealed containers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday to Harrison's Paint Center, 101 N. Main St. in Bel Air, and help launch Harford County's second annual Latex Paint Recycling Program. Last year, residents contributed enough paint to fill 500 one-gallon cans.The donated paint will be mixed on site. After being sent to the Loading Dock, a Baltimore-based building material recycler, the paint is distributed free or sold at a low price to low-income housing projects.
NEWS
January 7, 1994
The town of Manchester's recycling rate was 18.8 percent in November, says Councilwoman Kathryn L. Riley.In November, the town sent 79.47 tons of trash to the county landfill. During that month, the town recycled 18.45 tons of other trash, she said, saving $738 in tipping fees.The figures are for materials recycled at the curbside only, she said.Mrs. Riley said the amount of garbage the town sent to the landfill in November 1993 was 16.35 tons less than it dumped during November 1992.Asked what caused the decline, Mrs. Riley said, "I want to think it's the recycling bins."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
Falling prices for recycled paper has caused a $160,000 shortfall in Howard County's recycling program -- and raised fears that it might someday be cheaper to send all the county's trash to landfills.For several years, Simkins Industries in Catonsville has charged the county nothing to crush its paper into 1-ton blocks, truck them to its plant and recycle them for sale on the wholesale paper market, said John O'Hara, the county's waste-management chief.But the declining price of recycled paper prompted Simkins in December to stop paying for the first step -- turning the paper into blocks for shipment.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | August 31, 1993
The first phase of a uniform countywide curbside recycling program in Baltimore County begins next month when more than 10,000 households from Overlea to Perry Hall go to a schedule of one trash collection and one recycling pickup a week.By July 1, 1995, all 200,000 single-family and townhouse residences in the county will have the same "one and one" curbside recycling schedule. About 2,300 residences in the first-phase area now have some sort of recycling program.County Executive Roger B. Hayden, who announced the first-phase location Friday, said that after two years of experimenting with various schedules, "one and one" proved to be the most cost effective.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2003
FOR MANY children, recess is a chance to go outside and enjoy nature. For Steven Morton and Sean Meehan, recess is a chance to save Earth. Well, at least a small part of it. Every Friday, these West Friendship Elementary fourth-graders spend their recess time going around the school emptying recycling bins into large cans. Steven and Sean began planning their school's recycling program last fall as an enrichment project with the school's Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher, Elsa Fawcett.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
The final step in a countywide recycling program is about to be taken, and all apartment and condominium dwellers have to do is ask.All houses in the county have had curbside pickup of paper and containers since July 1993, but apartment dwellers still must haul their recyclables to the Mobile Recycling Truck (MoRt), the county landfill's recycling center in Marriottsville or to a private recycler.By summer's end, the county will start placing mobile recycling containers next to trash bins in 10 apartment complexes as a pilot program for the county's apartment recycling program, said Paul A. McIntyre, the county's residential recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard County will soon allow residents to add banana peels, egg shells and even old pizza boxes to their recyclables, becoming one of the first East Coast localities to start a large-scale composting program. The county is asking almost 5,000 Elkridge and Ellicott City residents this month to participate in the recycling program, which will begin in September and turn more than 20 percent of landfill waste into compost, reducing disposal costs. "We will make a product versus waste," said Evelyn Tomlin, chief of the county Bureau of Environmental Services.
NEWS
February 25, 2011
5k run/walk Registration is underway for the "Moving Around the World" 5K Run and Walk sponsored by the Rotary Club of Annapolis and the Rotaract Club of Annapolis on April 9. Event will be held in Quiet Waters Park's Sassafras Pavilion off Hillsmere Drive in Annapolis. Advance registration is $25; $30 on day of event; free for children 12 and younger. Sign in and race packet pick up is from 8:45 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., with runners beginning at 10 a.m., followed by the walkers.
NEWS
November 24, 2010
In response to "Baltimore County lauds expansion of single-stream recycling" (Nov. 23), I would like to point out a possible fatal flaw. I live at Henderson Webb apartments in Cockeysville and was very excited to hear we too were participating in the recycling program. When you reported that at one apartment complex, "all 10 recycling containers, which each hold two cubic yards, were full," I wondered what they were full of. At my apartment complex, all of our recycling dumpsters have been full as well.
NEWS
Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
A 600-unit apartment complex in Pikesville demonstrated how eagerly residents of Baltimore County's apartment and condominium complexes have responded to the expansion of single-stream recycling to their households. On Monday, the scheduled collection day at St. Charles at Old Court Apartments, all 10 recycling containers, which each hold two cubic yards, were full. County officials used the complex as a backdrop as they promoted the success of the expanded recycling program, which began six weeks ago and is among the first in the state to serve multifamily dwellings.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
The tangle of kids moved furiously around the bins after lunch. They tossed milk jugs in the yellow bin, napkins and half-eaten hot dogs in the green one and trays in the gray one. Students at Baltimore's Federal Hill Preparatory School haven't just been recycling the usual items, like paper and plastic, this year. They've sorted everything — from crayon pieces and pencil shavings to leftover meals. The full-bore effort to eliminate waste has been a project of Sheryl Barr's environmental studies class of sixth, seventh and eighth-graders, and has spread to many students' homes.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Even as towns across America expand recycling programs to meet the demands of increasingly green-minded residents, Ocean City is going against the wave. Its final pickup of cans, bottles and paper from homes and businesses will be next week. Up to three-quarters of the nation now has access to curbside pickup, according to environmental and government groups. But the tourist town is grappling with another national trend: budget troubles. The move will save Ocean City an estimated $1 million in the 2010-2011 fiscal year.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Bel Air resident Sharon Penrose started recycling her trash a year ago. Now, she says, "I just can't stop."Her enthusiasm for recycling is one reason Penrose volunteered to be one of the county's "block captains," whose mission is to inform neighbors about the voluntary trash recycling program that starts tomorrow.The captains' duties include distributing blue, plastic bags to hold recyclables and handing out pamphlets to neighbors so they'll understand clearly how Harford's residential curbside recycling program will work.
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