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NEWS
March 10, 2010
An Atlanta-based power company plans to build a recycling plant for ash produced by two of its coal-fired power plants in Southern Maryland. But spokeswoman Misty Allen denied a report that Mirant Mid-Atlantic plans to close its coal-ash landfill there, which is the focus of a state lawsuit alleging pollution of a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Allen said Mirant plans to build a processing plant in Charles County that would be able to treat all of the ash from the company's Morgantown and Chalk Point power plants.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
A local company said Friday that it is teaming up with another firm to build a Baltimore County recycling plant expected to employ about 50 people. Canusa Hershman Recycling Co., jointly headquartered in Baltimore and Connecticut, and Kentucky-based QRS Recycling Co. plan to open the "plastic recovery" facility late this year. The plant will take bales of mixed plastics from other recycling facilities - soda bottles, yogurt cups and the like - and separate the resins so they can be sold, said Jonathan Sloan, president of Canusa Hershman.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Baltimore County firefighters Saturday continued to work their way through a large paper recycling plant in Dundalk that was the scene of a three-alarm fire that caused part of the building's roof to collapse Friday night. A fire official said the collapsed roof at the Owl Corporation, on Graves Court near Lynch Cove, created a challenge for firefighters trying to reach parts of the warehouse that might still be burning. Units from throughout the east side of the county, as well as from Baltimore City, battled the blaze.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Baltimore County firefighters Saturday continued to work their way through a large paper recycling plant in Dundalk that was the scene of a three-alarm fire that caused part of the building's roof to collapse Friday night. A fire official said the collapsed roof at the Owl Corporation, on Graves Court near Lynch Cove, created a challenge for firefighters trying to reach parts of the warehouse that might still be burning. Units from throughout the east side of the county, as well as from Baltimore City, battled the blaze.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
A local company said Friday that it is teaming up with another firm to build a Baltimore County recycling plant expected to employ about 50 people. Canusa Hershman Recycling Co., jointly headquartered in Baltimore and Connecticut, and Kentucky-based QRS Recycling Co. plan to open the "plastic recovery" facility late this year. The plant will take bales of mixed plastics from other recycling facilities - soda bottles, yogurt cups and the like - and separate the resins so they can be sold, said Jonathan Sloan, president of Canusa Hershman.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2005
Dozens of Pasadena residents implored the Anne Arundel County Council in testimony Monday night not to approve a zoning change that would keep a nearby wood recycling plant open. "We don't want our quality of life ruined," said Helen Warfield, a civic activist who lives near the plant. Backers of the A-A Recycling & Sand plant said the council had improperly targeted the business when it approved a zoning change in 1999 that would have forced owner William H. DeBaugh to relocate within three years.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
Crofton officials upset at a decision to allow a concrete and asphalt recycling plant on Route 3 will get another chance to question state environmental officials before deciding whether to appeal that go-ahead.Representatives from the state and Crofton will meet tomorrow at Town Hall. Crofton officials will try to get answers that Civic Association President Ed Dosek said were not provided at a public hearing last month.The board of directors plans to decide next Monday whether to appeal the Maryland Department of the Environment's preliminary approval of a large crusher that would recycle 20,000 tons of concrete and asphalt a year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
Crofton officials are expected to call a special meeting within the next week to decide whether to appeal a state decision allowing a concrete and asphalt recycling plant on Route 3.The special meeting is necessary because the next scheduled meeting of the Crofton board is not until the first part of September, too late to challenge the state's decision.The state Department of the Environment gave E. L. Gardner Inc. preliminary approval in June to build the plant, which would recycle 20,000 tons of concrete and asphalt a year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
The Crofton Civic Association has decided not to appeal a state decision allowing a concrete and asphalt recycling plant on Route 3.After months of negotiations that culminated in a hurried round of talks at the end of last week, the association directors convened in a rare holiday meeting Monday night and decided NTC the company had done enough to appease the community.Town Manager Jordan Harding said representatives of E.L. Gardner Inc. agreed to new demands that the board insisted on at a meeting last Tuesday.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1991
Baltimore officials have refused to give a needed financial break to a proposed $42 million recycling and composting plant in Curtis Bay because the project was not a good deal for the city, the city's public works director says.Public Works Director George Balog says he rejected a request for help from officials of F&E Resource Systems Technology for Baltimore Inc., even though the firm's project could help the city achieve its state-mandated recycling goal, because of the costs and unanswered questions he had about the deal.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Supermarket shoppers in Maryland can't miss the signature blue-and-gold Perdue label on chicken and turkey in the meat section. The Salisbury-based company is the nation's third-largest seller of poultry. That makes it a prime target of environmentalists, who contend "Big Chicken" is fouling the Chesapeake Bay by not taking care of the animal waste produced by the flocks raised for it on thousands of farms across the Delmarva Peninsula. But in supermarkets with garden sections, consumers are likely to run across another product with links to Perdue, one that even environmentalists like — organic fertilizer, made with manure from some of the fowl grown for Perdue and other companies.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
An Atlanta-based power company plans to build a recycling plant for ash produced by two of its coal-fired power plants in Southern Maryland. But spokeswoman Misty Allen denied a report that Mirant Mid-Atlantic plans to close its coal-ash landfill there, which is the focus of a state lawsuit alleging pollution of a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Allen said Mirant plans to build a processing plant in Charles County that would be able to treat all of the ash from the company's Morgantown and Chalk Point power plants.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN | January 18, 2006
Hearing held on recycling plant Representatives for A-A Recycle & Sand asked Anne Arundel County's administrative hearing officer yesterday for permission to continue operating a wood-waste recycling plant in Pasadena. The hearing came four days after A-A Recycle's owner, William H. DeBaugh Jr., and the Lake Waterford Community Association Inc. signed a covenant that would limit the plant's hours of operation and provide additional landscaping buffers to shield nearby homes from dust, noise and odor.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2005
When Alexis Loo spoke this week before the Anne Arundel County Council, her frustration was palpable. It had been three months since the council rezoned a wood-waste recycling plant for industrial use, and a promised agreement with the business owner to restrict his operations has yet to be struck. Loo, president of a Pasadena community association, said she was worried that a deal would never happen, and that years of residents' complaints about noise, dust and odors emanating from A-A Recycle & Sand would go unaddressed.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
The furor over a wood-waste recycling business in Pasadena may not be over after all. As the Anne Arundel County Council turns its attention this week to rezoning portions of Glen Burnie and Brooklyn Park, council members are keeping a watchful eye on negotiations between representatives of A-A Recycle & Sand and the nearby community of Selby Grove. The council voted two weeks ago to change the zoning of A-A Recycle's property from commercial to industrial use - on the condition that nearby residents gain written assurances from the plant's owner, William H. DeBaugh Jr., that he address concerns of noise, dust and smell emanating from the site.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2005
Dozens of Pasadena residents implored the Anne Arundel County Council in testimony Monday night not to approve a zoning change that would keep a nearby wood recycling plant open. "We don't want our quality of life ruined," said Helen Warfield, a civic activist who lives near the plant. Backers of the A-A Recycling & Sand plant said the council had improperly targeted the business when it approved a zoning change in 1999 that would have forced owner William H. DeBaugh to relocate within three years.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 27, 1992
Pasadena already has eight junkyards and doesn't need a ninth, opponents of a proposed car dismantling and recycling plant said yesterday.CSX Realty, developers of a 2,273-home planned community on Marley Creek, and two salvage yard operators joined with area residents in asking the county Board of Appeals to deny a special exception needed to build the plant on 3.4 acres in the 6600 block of Fort Smallwood Road.Jack Feehly, president of the Greater Pasadena Council, which represents 28 communities, said residents have worked with CSX, which owns 1,600 acres in the area, to clean up Pasadena's image.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2004
Two Baltimore County councilmen introduced a bill last night that would require a zoning commissioner's approval for oil recycling facilities in areas zoned for manufacturing - a move that could prevent a North Point plant from operating. The proposal comes about a month after county officials rescinded their approval for U.S. Filter Recovery Services to operate an oil recycling facility in North Point. Although the company says it only recycles oil, county officials argued that the company's plan amounted to "refining" oil, requiring the company to seek a special exception from a zoning commissioner.
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