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Recycling Efforts

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NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
While the county executive prepares to get a large number of Harfordresidents to sort their trash for recycling, a more daunting task lays ahead: finding buyers for the glass, aluminum, paper and other recyclable material collected.The county executive is proposing a voluntary curbside recycling program just as prices plummet for a broadrange of recycled commodities.The countywide program County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann proposed last month could move Harford ahead of other Baltimore-area jurisdictions, which are taking a phased-in approach to meet a state mandate to reduce its waste streams by 1994.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The Howard County school system has entered into a new contract with the company used by the county for its garbage and recycling efforts, saving the school system an expected $40,000 in its first year. Under the new contract with Jenn-Kans, a small trash-disposal company based in Tuxedo, there will also be additional savings based on the amount of recycling done by the school system, which was not included in its previous contract with Waste Management. The switch, which took effect July 1, is the result of talks between the school system and the county over the past year, according to Ken Roey, the school system's executive director of facilities.
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NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Contributing writer | January 5, 1992
At the Georgetown North restaurant in Bel Air, 600 to 700 pounds of glass are placed in bins for recycling each week.Owner Gary Clarkhas bought a truck specifically to haul the glass to a central recycling center because no local trash haulers offer separate collection of recyclables.He's also working with distributors to provide returnable beer bottles as another way to cut down the waste. Currently, Georgetown North returns 1,500 to 1,800 returnable bottles a week."We can buy returnables cheaper," Clark says.
NEWS
December 4, 2008
Here's a good trivia question for your next holiday get-together (or at least when it's time to clean up all the empty bottles and cans): Which Maryland county recycles the highest percentage of its trash? Surprisingly, it isn't affluent, Birkenstock-wearing Montgomery County but working-class Baltimore County that takes the prize. Last year, the county recycled about 1.2 million tons of its nearly 2 million tons of solid waste, or roughly 62 percent of all refuse. Much of it comes from a single source.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Anne Arundel County is expanding its recycling program to include several more plastics, papers and metals, as part of a larger effort to encourage residents to recycle half of what they dispose. Among the items now eligible for curbside recycling service are: plastic bags, plastic cups, plastic plates and plastic utensils, paper milk and juice cartons, and aluminum foil and pans. "There's no additional cost," said Richard Bowen, the solid waste recycling manager for Anne Arundel's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
September 15, 1993
Carroll's recycling rate climbed to 16 percent in August, up from 13 percent in July, county officials reported yesterday.The county's overall recycling rate for the first eight months of 1993 was 20.3 percent, up from about 17 percent for the first six months, said Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Mr. Curfman credited the high rate to the fact that yard waste is being composted, a form of recycling, instead of being buried with other refuse at Carroll landfills. He also said more businesses have been reporting their recycling efforts to the county.
NEWS
October 22, 1990
The city will soon begin large-scale curbside collection of recyclable trash, joining Anne Arundel County and other jurisdictions in an effort to comply with Maryland's 1988 recycling law and to deal with a worsening landfill shortage.Do you recycle your trash? Do you think recycling efforts should be expanded? Do you think the recycling of certain items should be mandatory?To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County) today until midnight. After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your touch-tone phone.
NEWS
December 1, 1991
It is not often that financially strapped Baltimore City offers services that are lacking in more affluent Baltimore County. Yet curbside collection of recyclable paper has been introduced throughout the city while the county is still plodding and procrastinating in its recycling efforts.Beginning in January, the city will also phase in a program of collecting glass, plastic, aluminum and tin cans. When that happens, the city will offer more people curbside recycling that any other jurisdiction in Maryland.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Howard County should have no trouble meeting its state-mandated 20 percent recycling goal by the beginning of 1994, officials say, but it still lags behind other metropolitan-area jurisdictions in a recent state report.The county's recycling rate jumped to 18 percent for the first half of 1993, compared with 12 percent for the last half of 1992, according to a report by the Maryland Department of the Environment's Recycling Division, which was sent to county officials last month.The difference came mainly from improved voluntary reporting by businesses of their individual recycling efforts, said John J. O'Hara, director of the county's Bureau of Environmental Services.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | February 19, 1992
Last December, the town's recycling program reached a zenith when citizens dropped off a record amount of goods at the bin in Watkins Park.But after this coming December, the bin may be a memory, and the town's volunteer recycling program could be dismantled.Still, that's a positive -- if ironic -- development, say volunteers who've logged many hours to make the town's recycling efforts successful.That's because the phasing out of voluntary programs means a countywide, mandatory recycling program is at hand.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Anne Arundel County is expanding its recycling program to include several more plastics, papers and metals, as part of a larger effort to encourage residents to recycle half of what they dispose. Among the items now eligible for curbside recycling service are: plastic bags, plastic cups, plastic plates and plastic utensils, paper milk and juice cartons, and aluminum foil and pans. "There's no additional cost," said Richard Bowen, the solid waste recycling manager for Anne Arundel's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
September 29, 2001
RECYCLING depends on more than government mandates and feel-good public participation. It depends on a willingness to pay the price to keep the system running. That price of operations will likely be going up, with news that a major recycling company serving three metro counties and Baltimore City is quitting the business. These jurisdictions will have to find other firms to collect and recycle their mountains of used paper, glass and plastic. And there is disappointingly little competition for such contracts, with still-limited markets for reusing these discarded materials.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
WHEN HOWARD and Baltimore county residents gained curbside recycling, they gave up one of their two trash-collection days. Sure, some people grumbled, but many saw it as an even swap. Anne Arundel County should have done the same when it began curbside recycling in 1991. But it didn't. Local governments started curbside recycling, after all, to discourage citizens from carelessly discarding reusable materials such as plastic, aluminum, cereal boxes and newspapers. Here, the message wasn't clear.
NEWS
January 10, 2000
WHEN officials in Anne Arundel County wanted to learn how well recycling efforts were working, they sampled trash at the Millersville landfill. The results were revealing: Half the waste buried in the ground was recyclable. Public works officials estimate that 59,000 tons of reusable waste is headed to trash cans instead of recycling bins. That's 250 pounds per resident each year -- way too much. About 70 percent of the trashed recyclable waste is paper. Residents can make a big difference by recycling junk mail, a sizable chunk of that 250 pounds.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
The County Council voted last night to approve two unrelated zoning changes, one to allow a new kind of health center in Anne Arundel and another to allow recycling of construction and demolition debris in industrial areas.The council voted 6-0 to approve zoning for "health and wellness centers," which offer physical rehabilitation and generally cater to an older clientele than health clubs do. Councilman George Bachman, a Linthicum Heights Democrat, was absent.Centers would be allowed in areas zoned for office parks and retail, in highway commercial districts, and in industrial parks and light-industrial areas.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
Suburban Maryland officials are on the verge of wagering tens of millions of tax dollars on the appetite of trash-munching microbes.These are the same microbes that feast on the dead leaves and grass clippings in your back yard.Officials from a half-dozen counties, including Anne Arundel and Carroll, who are meeting in Annapolis today, want to unleash those microbes on everything from pizza boxes to old shoes."I've been hooked on the idea of composting since 1992," said Carroll County Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 25, 1991
Sorry, but this one is irresistible: The new environmental reporter on WMAR-Channel 2, Scott Broom, makes a clean sweep of the recycling scene in a half-hour news special tonight.Puns aside, "Closing the Loop" (at 8:30) offers a worthwhile introduction to the growth of regional recycling efforts in Baltimore, Montgomery County, Washington and Northern Virginia and urges viewers to get involved."The hard part is getting started," says Broom, who last montreplaced Brad Bell as Channel 2's Project Environment reporter.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Mount Airy, which recycles 40 percent of its trash, has won recognition from the Maryland Recyclers Coalition for "bringing recycling to a small community."Four years ago, the Mount Airy Town Council formed a citizens recycling committee to spearhead community recycling efforts.The committee worked with officials in Frederick and Carroll counties to get drop-off recycling bins placed throughout the town to collect clear and colored glass, aluminum cans and plastic. The town straddles the Frederick-Carroll border.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
Peter McGraw's machine could help save the oceans.The mechanical engineer from Arnold has invented a processor that will shrink plastics to one-thirtieth their original size, allowing them to be stored as 20-inch circular discs aboard Navy ships at sea until they return to port.The Navy, meanwhile, is working with Seaward International, a private company, to turn the discs, called bricks, into marine pilings to be used in shoreside construction."I don't see [bricks] as the end-all solution, I see recycling," said Mr. McGraw, who works for the Naval Surface Warfare Center.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A plastic industry research group has unveiled a high-tech, computerized bottle sorter for recycling plants that it says should speed up the laborious process of separating plastic refuse and expand the types of plastics that can be recycled.The group, the American Plastics Council, underwrote the rTC technology, which is similar to the checkout scanner at the grocery store, and will provide about $1 million to test it in an Oregon recycling plant."There's a very good chance this is a technology that is going to revolutionize the industry," said Susan Moore, a spokeswoman for the council.
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