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NEWS
By Carla Crowder and Carla Crowder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 1997
EL PRADO, N.M. -- Construction on Karin Payne's dream home has stopped.No more hammers pounding dirt into tires. It's been weeks since an empty Bud Light can was screwed into a mud wall.Payne's dream home is a desert Earthship, crafted from recycled materials with power only from the sun and running water only from the clouds. "My goal was to have zero impact on the exploitation of the earth or of people," says Payne, 39, a refugee from West Coast yuppiedom. A baseball cap shields her eyes from the sun and her ponytail from the wind as she sits cross-legged in the dirt looking over blueprints.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | September 28, 2009
Tens of thousands of people will converge on the city in October to watch or participate in the Baltimore Running Festival. But if all goes according to plan, they won't leave much of a footprint. Organizers of the marathon and the day's other races will recycle cups, hand out reduced-plastic bottles, compost food and waste, collect discarded shoes, and use alternative-energy cars. They'll hand out race shirts made from 100 percent recycled materials. And they'll plant 100 trees along the race course.
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BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2003
When Chuck Fox and his family decided it was time to remodel their Crownsville home, they had a lot of questions about what to use and how much it would all cost, but one thing was for sure - the only color on the palette would be green. An environmentally friendly design - often referred to as "green building" - was a given for Fox, former director of the state Department of Natural Resources and currently senior policy adviser at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. That meant optimal use of the sun, recycled supplies and new materials that had the least negative impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
If there is a common theme linking the finalists for the Janet & Walker Sondheim Prize, it may be that the methods of creating art can be as important as the art itself. "This year is a very process-oriented, installation-based type of show," says Gary Kachadourian, visual arts coordinator with the Baltimore Office for Promotion in the Arts, which created the prize to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Artscape in 2006. "It is a good mix of people, representing a good mix of ideas." Those ideas include finding the artistic potential in dirt, photocopied books, recycled materials, barren parking lots, a polar bear's heart rate and even vintage cartoon character Mr. Magoo.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
Lake Shore site yields tons of trashWhen county workers hauled 112 tons of trash out of the future Lake Shore Athletic Complex last month, nearly 80 percent of it went to the Millersville Landfill.The rest was recycled. Almost 13 tons of scrap metal were plucked from the woods and scrub that cover the 127-acre site, and sent to United Iron and Metal in South Baltimore, county spokeswoman Louise Hayman said.Another 13 tons of tires were sent to Joseph Smith and Sons Inc., a Prince George's County recycler, Ms. Hayman said.
FEATURES
By John Javna and John Javna,The EarthWorks Group | April 6, 1991
If we want to be recycling activists, the most effective "simple thing" we can do is push our local governments to buy supplies made from recycled materials.Think about it: You can collect all the bottles and newspapers you want, but if no manufacturers use them in their products, your efforts are wasted.So we have to create a market for recycled products. Each of us can and should buy them whenever possible. But each of us only has limited purchasing power.Government, on the other hand, has real economic clout.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001
Since the first Earth Day celebration in 1970, new homes have become 100 percent more energy efficient and construction has become more conservation friendly, according to a new publication from the National Association of Home Builders. The report, "Building Greener, Building Better: The Quiet Revolution," reviews the materials, products and processes that the housing industry now uses to provide "greener" housing choices. Some examples: Different wood products have reduced the need for plywood from older, mature trees by 60 percent.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
Edward J. Gossett Jr. is on a mission to make us all more environmentally correct. He's selling T-shirts made partly from recycled plastic, unbleached paper towels and cleaning liquids that won't pollute.Operation Green Co. in Westminster is stocked and ready to supply the region's demand for products made from recycled materials."I'm now being referred to as 'Hey, you're the recycling guy,' " said Mr. Gossett, 24, who opened the business a month ago in a former plumbing company office on Pennsylvania Avenue near Vince's Seafood.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1991
A Baltimore County Council committee asked the county executive yesterday to look into weekly curbside recycling, but county administrators said it may be too expensive and will require further study before they reach any decisions.County Executive Roger B. Hayden unveiled a recycling plan Nov. 4 that was criticized for not going far enough to promote or mandate recycling.The plan calls for expanding curbside collection of mixed paper to 55,000 homes by next July and offering curbside collection of mixed paper and lawn waste to half of the county's 282,000 homes by 1994.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | February 4, 2007
For Gillian Engelbrecht, 11, a fifth-grader at Jeffers Hill Elementary School, one of the best parts about creating a mosaic for the school has been working on a team. Instead of working on one section from concept to completion, the students share responsibility. "They made us work on different things," she said, as she scraped grout between spaces on a near-completed section of the mosaic last week. Like other students involved in the project, Gillian came up with an idea for a section, but then worked to place bits of broken pottery, shells and other objects on a design created by someone else.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Piled on two rolling carts: four panel doors, two cases of gray ceramic tile, two bags of grout, one white pedestal sink, still boxed, and a pail of mortar. The doors need some work. The tiles are in perfect shape: unused. The sink is in the original box. Grand total: $156, less than half the retail price. The castoffs of some homeowner or builder have become the treasures of another at the Loading Dock, a nonprofit Baltimore warehouse that sells reusable building goods and builder's seconds.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Amy Milauskas and Carol Tortella want to do more for the environment than hang up public-service announcements and oversee traditional recycling campaigns. The two Wilde Lake Middle School teachers were among nearly 40 Howard County educators who attended a training session offered this week by the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education on how schools can join its Green School Recognition program. Ten Howard County schools are members of the program, which encourages schools to adopt more environmentally friendly practices and infuse environmental content into the curriculum.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | February 4, 2007
For Gillian Engelbrecht, 11, a fifth-grader at Jeffers Hill Elementary School, one of the best parts about creating a mosaic for the school has been working on a team. Instead of working on one section from concept to completion, the students share responsibility. "They made us work on different things," she said, as she scraped grout between spaces on a near-completed section of the mosaic last week. Like other students involved in the project, Gillian came up with an idea for a section, but then worked to place bits of broken pottery, shells and other objects on a design created by someone else.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | December 3, 2006
For Michelangelo and Bernini, marble inspired masterpiece sculptures. But for three Carroll County high school students, tin boxes, a vinyl record, hundreds of paper clips and glue guns did the trick. Those materials and other objects scrounged up and scouted for in basements and friends' junk piles were among the winning entries in a recent state sculpture competition hosted by the Maryland Department of the Environment in Baltimore. The "Rethink Recycling" contest, now in its fifth year, serves as one way the department recognizes America Recycles Day - Nov. 15 - a national campaign that encourages Americans to recycle and buy recycled products.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
Harford County's proposed solid waste management plan calls for four rubble collection sites, including the reopening of a controversial landfill in the fast-growing Abingdon area. There is already growing opposition, among residents and County Council members, to a plan to use the Spencer sand and gravel pit off Abingdon Road as a landfill for construction and demolition debris. "That's not the place for a landfill," said Council President Robert S. Wagner. "The population has grown significantly in that area since the site was closed in the early 1990s."
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2003
When Chuck Fox and his family decided it was time to remodel their Crownsville home, they had a lot of questions about what to use and how much it would all cost, but one thing was for sure - the only color on the palette would be green. An environmentally friendly design - often referred to as "green building" - was a given for Fox, former director of the state Department of Natural Resources and currently senior policy adviser at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. That meant optimal use of the sun, recycled supplies and new materials that had the least negative impact on the environment.
BUSINESS
By Grant Ferrier and Grant Ferrier,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | March 26, 1991
Paper down. Plastics up. Metals and glass level. That seems to be the market consensus for recycled materials in the first quarter of 1991. The post-consumer recycling business has always ridden the roller coaster of changing commodity prices with companies coming and going with each climb and descent. As the industry matures, however, companies are finding it increasingly risky to base their profits on selling recycled materials.Many recyclers who depended on getting good prices for their material have fallen by the wayside.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
Harford's County executive says she's come up with a plan to offer a financial incentive to companies for using more recycled materials in manufacturing -- without costing the state a cent.Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann wants to create a tax credit for the equipment needed to reprocess recyclables and turn them into forms that can be used in manufacturing."This would set a precedent in the state and help create markets for recycled materials," she said.Mrs. Rehrmann pitched her idea to Harford's General Assembly delegation Friday.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | September 30, 2001
"I wanted to bring to Washington the concept of moderna, fine contemporary Italian furniture produced by companies with enduring reputations," says Peruvian-born architect and interior designer Deborah Kalkstein. With the opening of Contemporaria, her sleek and elegant home furnishings store, she has succeeded. Contemporaria offers the best of modern, showcasing wares by virtuoso design firms such as Minotti, Pierantonio Bonacina, Halifax, Paola Lenti, Casa Milano and Album, as well as Woodnotes paper rugs from Finland, lighting by FAD of France and Foscarini of Italy, and bedding by Matteo.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001
Since the first Earth Day celebration in 1970, new homes have become 100 percent more energy efficient and construction has become more conservation friendly, according to a new publication from the National Association of Home Builders. The report, "Building Greener, Building Better: The Quiet Revolution," reviews the materials, products and processes that the housing industry now uses to provide "greener" housing choices. Some examples: Different wood products have reduced the need for plywood from older, mature trees by 60 percent.
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