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Tim Wheeler | March 8, 2012
Anglers and watermen are at odds, again, this time over fishing license fees.  With the Maryland Department of Natural Resources facing a looming deficit in funds for overseeing both recreational and commercial fishing, anglers are pushing a bill that would require the state to cover 90 percent of its costs for managing each fishery with license fees from the people engaged in that activity. They testified before the House Environmental Matters Committee in support of HB1173 , while watermen argued that the issue needs more study.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 8, 2012
Anglers and watermen are at odds, again, this time over fishing license fees.  With the Maryland Department of Natural Resources facing a looming deficit in funds for overseeing both recreational and commercial fishing, anglers are pushing a bill that would require the state to cover 90 percent of its costs for managing each fishery with license fees from the people engaged in that activity. They testified before the House Environmental Matters Committee in support of HB1173 , while watermen argued that the issue needs more study.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Federal authorities unveiled yesterday the first comprehensive management plan aimed at restoring dwindling Atlantic stocks of migratory fish such as swordfish, sharks, tuna and marlin.The National Marine Fisheries Service effort, an attempt to reverse years of overfishing of many ocean species, was described as a comprehensive process that involved more than 5,000 environmentalists and commercial and recreational fishermen who testified during 27 public hearings in the past six months.The managed species include Atlantic bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin, albacore and skipjack tuna, Atlantic swordfish and 72 species of shark in U.S. waters from Maine to Texas.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Maryland chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association is calling on the state to more efficiently manage the costs of commercial fisheries. Under the current structure, only 20 percent of the cost for managing the activities of commercial fisheries comes from license and permit fees, compared to 93 percent of the cost for managing recreational fishing. While federal grants account for another 23 percent of the cost of managing commercial fishing, it means that up to 57 percent comes from Maryland taxpayers.
NEWS
By Steven Kreytak and Steven Kreytak,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1998
Commercial striped bass harvests jumped 77 percent in 1996 in the Chesapeake Bay area, the largest increase since Maryland lifted its rockfish moratorium in 1989, the federal government has reported.The rise from 1.98 million pounds in 1995 to 3.51 million pounds in 1996 was possible because federal scientists - growing more confident that once-depleted striped bass stocks continue to gain strength - raised the annual harvest quota. The 1997 quota was raised to 4.3 million pounds.But watermen say the government is being too cautious.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Maryland chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association is calling on the state to more efficiently manage the costs of commercial fisheries. Under the current structure, only 20 percent of the cost for managing the activities of commercial fisheries comes from license and permit fees, compared to 93 percent of the cost for managing recreational fishing. While federal grants account for another 23 percent of the cost of managing commercial fishing, it means that up to 57 percent comes from Maryland taxpayers.
NEWS
By Gary Diamond | June 16, 1991
If you've been looking for a positive and inexpensive activity for your children this summer, you might consider recreational fishing.All it takes is a little time, patience and some relatively inexpensive fishing tackle.One of the most important aspects of teaching youngsters how to fish is giving them enough to do to keep their attention. In other words, they need action. Just sitting around and enjoying the birds or looking at the water isn't relaxing to a five-year-old -- it's total boredom.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Candus Thomson and David Nitkin and Candus Thomson,Sun reporters | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a move being cheered by recreational anglers, President Bush will announce today new conservation goals for a popular Chesapeake Bay fish that include stricter limits on commercial hauls of rockfish but greater access for outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy catching the species. The new federal policy - largely advisory in nature - will come through an executive order the president is scheduled to issue during a visit to St. Michaels on the Eastern Shore. After signing the order, Bush plans to go fishing on the Chesapeake, he said in a weekend radio address recorded yesterday.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | April 28, 1991
The Striped Bass Advisory Board wrapped up its sessions on the 1991 striped bass seasons Thursday evening and gave its recommendations tothe state Department of Natural Resources.The DNR will prepare the regulations for the fall season, schedule public hearings during May and publish the final version of the regulations sometime before the fall season begins.The board recommended a recreational season begin Oct. 11 that would give each angler two striped bass tags and 17 days to catch the fish.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | August 28, 1992
With the fall 1992 rockfish season but a month a way, it's surprising how many fishermen do not know what's happening. I had three questions Monday regarding creel limit and whether tags will be required. The following is the most up-to-date release from the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and should answer everyone's questions on the 1992 fall striped bass or rockfish season.The fall season opens Oct. 1 and runs through Oct. 31. It will pick up again Nov. 6-8, 13-15 and 20-22, for a total of 40 days.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass. NRP said it shot video to prove in court that the anglers were targeting striped bass and not accidentally catching them while chasing other species.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 3, 2010
Armed with an ancient stopwatch and a brand-new hangover that made the glowing numbers on the digital clock seem as piercing as the searchlights at Alcatraz, I picked up the telephone at 4 a.m. New Year's Day and dialed my way into legality. By 4:09, I was a federally registered angler, a process that proved to be less painful than the throbbing inside my brainpan. All it took was remembering who I was, where I lived, when I was born, my phone number and the three states where I hope to fish this year.
NEWS
By Robert Glenn | November 2, 2007
When President Bush signed an executive order in St. Michaels recently making it federal policy to conserve striped bass for the recreational, economic and environmental benefit of present and future generations, his action recognized the importance of recreational fishing to conservation and called for a change in how policymakers value our fisheries. Maryland's elected officials and professionals at the Department of Natural Resources would be wise to consider the benefits of prohibiting the sale of striped bass by designating the state fish a gamefish.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Candus Thomson and David Nitkin and Candus Thomson,Sun reporters | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a move being cheered by recreational anglers, President Bush will announce today new conservation goals for a popular Chesapeake Bay fish that include stricter limits on commercial hauls of rockfish but greater access for outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy catching the species. The new federal policy - largely advisory in nature - will come through an executive order the president is scheduled to issue during a visit to St. Michaels on the Eastern Shore. After signing the order, Bush plans to go fishing on the Chesapeake, he said in a weekend radio address recorded yesterday.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 30, 2007
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- Maryland's lucrative and popular trophy striped bass season will be a shell of its former self this spring after regulators decided yesterday to drastically reduce the state's catch. By a vote of 7-6, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission rejected a proposal by Maryland to eliminate the spring quota and allow recreational fishing under regulations similar to other Eastern Seaboard states. Instead, it overwhelmingly approved a target quota of 30,000 fish - about half the total catch in each of the past two years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2006
For the fifth year in a row, unusual wind patterns off the coast of Oregon have produced a large "dead zone," an area so low in oxygen that fish and crabs suffocate. This dead zone is unlike those in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, which result from fertilizer, sewage or runoff from hog or poultry operations carried by rivers. The Oregon zone appears when the wind generates strong currents carrying nutrient-rich but oxygen-poor water from the deep sea to the surface near shore, a process called upwelling.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2006
For the fifth year in a row, unusual wind patterns off the coast of Oregon have produced a large "dead zone," an area so low in oxygen that fish and crabs suffocate. This dead zone is unlike those in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, which result from fertilizer, sewage or runoff from hog or poultry operations carried by rivers. The Oregon zone appears when the wind generates strong currents carrying nutrient-rich but oxygen-poor water from the deep sea to the surface near shore, a process called upwelling.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 30, 2007
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- Maryland's lucrative and popular trophy striped bass season will be a shell of its former self this spring after regulators decided yesterday to drastically reduce the state's catch. By a vote of 7-6, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission rejected a proposal by Maryland to eliminate the spring quota and allow recreational fishing under regulations similar to other Eastern Seaboard states. Instead, it overwhelmingly approved a target quota of 30,000 fish - about half the total catch in each of the past two years.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 28, 2003
The men behind the curtain doing the hiring in the Ehrlich administration have been plenty busy since taking over in January. One of the guys they didn't hire was Niccolo Machiavelli. Of course he's been dead about 500 years, but nobody's perfect. ("Nick Machiavelli," joked a sports colleague. "Raiders tackle, right?) In his writings, Machiavelli, the Renaissance political philosopher, advised that it's not what you do to people, it's what people perceive you're doing to them that counts.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Federal authorities unveiled yesterday the first comprehensive management plan aimed at restoring dwindling Atlantic stocks of migratory fish such as swordfish, sharks, tuna and marlin.The National Marine Fisheries Service effort, an attempt to reverse years of overfishing of many ocean species, was described as a comprehensive process that involved more than 5,000 environmentalists and commercial and recreational fishermen who testified during 27 public hearings in the past six months.The managed species include Atlantic bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin, albacore and skipjack tuna, Atlantic swordfish and 72 species of shark in U.S. waters from Maine to Texas.
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