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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | May 9, 1993
Early last week, perhaps 100 fishermen and retailers gathered in Salisbury to hear the Department of Natural Resources' proposed changes in regulations for sea trout and spotted trout catches in the Chesapeake Bay and the state's coastal waters.There were two primary responses -- that, yes, all wanted to ensure that the species could survive and multiply, but in the process, wasn't there a way to be less restrictive in the proposed creel limits for recreational fishermen.In a nutshell, DNR needs to be within the catch parameters assigned to all coastal states by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker | November 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Department of Natural Resources said yesterday that the recreational season for rockfish will be reopened Saturday and Sunday with a daily creel limit of two fish per person.Earlier, the DNR had announced that the charter-boat season, which was closed ahead of schedule a few weeks ago, also would be allowed to operate this weekend.DNR spokesman Francis McFaden said yesterday that the recreational season was being reopened because poor weather last weekend had reduced the number of anglers on the water.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
The Department of Natural Resources will announce today that it has made its own large catch — 60 recreational fishermen involved in a variety of illegal activities on Maryland's waterways in the past five months. As a result, the agency has proposed suspending their licenses for anywhere from 30 days to a year depending on the seriousness of the crime. It marks the first time that the DNR has proposed recreational licenses be suspended since the legislature empowered it to do so more than two years ago. Those who are in jeopardy of losing their licenses have been notified by mail and have 30 days to request an administrative hearing.
SPORTS
September 30, 1990
MarylandDepartment of Natural Resources: (301) 974-3664Season: Oct. 5 through Nov. 9 in Maryland waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries as well as in the Atlantic Ocean off the Maryland coastline.Creel limits: Recreational fishermen aboard privately owned boats or bank fishermen may keep two fish per day. Charter boat customers may keep five fish per day. Charter boat captains and mates may not keep any fish while on charter.Size limits: In the Chesapeake and its tributaries, the minimum size will be 18 inches and the maximum, 36 inches.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton and Bill Burton,Evening Sun Staff | October 17, 1990
This Saturday's shutdown of the Maryland charter fishery for rockfish, which was announced yesterday, should ease rising tensions between charterboat skippers and recreational fishermen who had their season closed last Sunday by the Department of Natural Resources.Meanwhile, fisheries managers in the District of Columbia announced its season will continue until its scheduled end Nov. 16, with a limit of two a day. "We don't have the same problem [overcatching] here as they do in Maryland," spokeswoman Bonnie Rampersaud said late yesterday.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | November 6, 1992
The parameters of the fall rockfish season for recreational fishermen and charter-boat customers have changed again, +V Department of Natural Resources Secretary Torrey C. Brown announced yesterday.Under the latest revision, the recreational season will end Saturday at 8 p.m. The charter-boat season will run Saturday and Sunday, as well as Nov. 14 and 15.Fishing will be limited to 5 a.m. and 8 p.m. in all cases.Earlier this week, DNR had indicated that both the recreational and charter-boat seasons would end at 8 p.m. Sunday.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 14, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The voices of Maryland's recreational and commercial fishermen were heard yesterday during an Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee hearing on Senate Bill 575, the Rockfish Preservation Act of 1991.During more than two hours of testimony, sportfishing interests praised SB 575 as a method by which the state's recovering stocks of rockfish could be further conserved.Representatives of commercial fishermen, the charter-boat industry and the Department of Natural Resources opposed the bill.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- On Monday night, 750 fishermen stood across the street from the front steps of the statehouse chanting, "Rockfish/gamefish. No more nets."Among saltwater sportfishermen, these are meaningful phrases, and the 750 people who had marched from Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium to the plaza before the statehouse wanted their phrases to be heard distinctly by the members of the state legislature arriving for a session.Certainly, as a television crew from Channel 11 and a handful of print reporters recorded the proceedings, the voice of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association was heard.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
The Department of Natural Resources' fall striped bass (rockfish) seasons for recreational and charter-boat fishermen were approved by the General Assembly's Administrative Executive Legislative Review Committee yesterday.Both seasons will open Oct. 1 in Maryland waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. The recreational season will close Nov. 7 and the charter-boat season will close Nov. 21.Recreational fishermen will be allowed one rockfish per day, and charter-boat customers will be allowed two. Rockfish must be at least 18 inches in length, with no maximum this year.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
OCEAN CITY - Maryland must slash its harvest of summer flounder nearly in half this year, and nowhere is that felt more acutely than here, where a large part of the tourist dollar is spent on fishing trips. More than 150 angry charter boat captains, tackle shop operators and recreational fishermen packed the city council chambers last night to complain bitterly about the cuts. Phil Jones, head of resource management for the fisheries division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, had hardly begun his explanation of the quotas when he was interrupted.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
Commercial watermen, recreational fishermen and Chesapeake Bay environmentalists lined up yesterday in support of a plan to require Maryland's recreational crabbers to purchase licenses and to limit their daily catches. "The recreational fishermen are willing to pay to participate in this resource," said Richard Novotny, executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sport Fishermen's Association. "We support the Chesapeake Bay, and we're happy to share and support the fishery." Legislation before the General Assembly would require all recreational crabbers to buy $5 licenses -- or pay $2 if they already own fishing licenses -- and it would restrict them to taking one bushel of crabs per boat per day. Current regulations require only recreational crabbers who use a lot of equipment to purchase licenses.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
Commercial watermen, recreational fishermen and Chesapeake Bay environmentalists lined up yesterday in support of a plan to require Maryland's recreational crabbers to purchase licenses and to limit their daily catches. "The recreational fishermen are willing to pay to participate in this resource," said Richard Novotny, executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sport Fishermen's Association. "We support the Chesapeake Bay, and we're happy to share and support the fishery." Legislation before the General Assembly would require all recreational crabbers to buy $5 licenses - or pay $2 if they already have fishing licenses - and it would restrict them to taking one bushel of crabs per boat per day. Current regulations require only recreational crabbers who use a lot of equipment to purchase licenses.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- Strict new rules for marlin, bluefin tuna, swordfish, sharks and other game fish have Ocean City charter boat captains complaining that heavy-handed federal oversight is threatening their business.About a month before the regulations take effect June 1, recreational anglers and charter boat operators are waiting for final word from the National Marine Fisheries Service about which species of fish they will be allowed to catch and keep and how long the seasons will be."I've seen the regulations get tighter and tighter over the years," said Bob Gowar, chief captain at the Ocean City Fishing Center, where 35 charter boat captains tie up. "The recreational fishermen take the beating on everything that goes down."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
Maryland's recreational and charter-boat fishermen probably can look forward to an uninterrupted rockfish season this year from late April through November, and fisheries biologists are hopeful that size limits and dates can be standardized for several years to come.Dr. Robert Bachman, chief of fisheries for the Department of Natural Resources, said yesterday the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission unanimously approved extended seasons and creel limits for rockfish. However, he said, the state legislature still must approve the changes.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The federal government has announced rules that will reduce some commercial shark fishing by half and impose new limits on recreational fishermen.With Atlantic shark populations at historically low levels because of overfishing and threats to their habitat, the rules by the National Marine Fisheries Service will affect about 150 commercial fishermen and thousands of recreational fishermen along the Atlantic coast primarily from Florida to North Carolina.For South Florida shark fishermen, the new regulations mean the first six-month shark fishing season will end about three months early at 11:30 p.m. on April 7, and will remain closed until the second season begins July 1.The rules set new limits on fishing for 39 species of sharks and bans intentional fishing for five species considered rare or vulnerable, including great white sharks made famous by the "Jaws" book and movies.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,Department of Natural Resources, Tidewater Fisheries | November 10, 1992
Last Saturday, Maryland closed down the fall rockfish season for recreational anglers who fished from private boats or the shoreline. While the season was ended for the private fisherman, the charter-boat fishermen were allowed to continue fishing.Was the private recreational angler ripped off?According to figures from the Department of Natural Resources, they were not.However, recreational fishermen did catch more than their quota. Again.And probably that should not be too surprising, if one looks at the numbers.
NEWS
By Cpt. Bob Spore | November 2, 1990
Abraham Lincoln said: "You can fool some of the people all of the time, you can fool all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time."It appears as if the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association (MSSA) will be happy with fooling some of the fishermen some of the time with its attack on commercial watermen.I wandered into an outdoor sporting goods shop earlier this week and found a blaze orange sign on the counter: "Attention Sportfishermen: Commercial watermen want you to stop fishing.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
Recreational fishermen in Maryland and other states will be allowed to catch 50 percent more striped bass this year under a new plan approved yesterday for regulating the restored fishery.With the once-threatened species now thriving, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission authorized states from Maine to North Carolina to expand their catch of the migratory fish, known as rockfish in the Chesapeake Bay.Only a few states have a commercial fishery for striped bass. In Maryland, the quota will increase 15 percent, to some 1.1 million pounds.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 30, 1993
ROCKFISH OPENERMaryland's fall striped bass (rockfish) season opens at 5 a.m. tomorrow, and rain or shine, wind or calm, the turnout of fishermen probably will be formidable throughout the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and its lower tributaries.Since mid-summer, rockfish have been mixed with bluefish in many areas of the bay, and often have drawn mixed reactions from anglers pleased by their abundance and vexed by the closed season.Now that the season is opening, of course, the stripers will begin moving away from their late summer haunts.
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