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Recreational Facilities

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NEWS
September 1, 1991
Editor's note: Some residents are saying Carroll County needs more recreational facilities; others disagree. We have been asking readers if they believe Carroll has enough rec facilities, if they are maintained properly, how they compare with rec facilities they have visitedin other counties, if there are any types of facilities that don't exist in Carroll that they think are needed, and if the existing facilities are enough to handle the demand placed on...
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
It's not often that being called "a pain in the butt" is a good thing. But Bob Bradshaw grinned as politicians recalled his years of polite — yet relentless advocacy for Davidsonville Park. Bradshaw has long been praised as a driving force behind the creation and design of the park, which opened in 2005 on the site of a former sand and gravel mine. To recognize that work, Anne Arundel County named the park's main road "Bob Bradshaw Way" last week. "It's only a street sign, but every time I drive by, I will remember fondly the work Bob did," said state Sen. Ed Reilly, who worked with Bradshaw on the park when Reilly was a member of the County Council.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
In a project sparked by the shortage of recreational facilities in Baltimore County, an idle factory in White Marsh is being converted to a complex of indoor soccer and lacrosse fields.Gerard Novak, president of Freestate Indoor Sports Inc., said his corporation gained occupancy this week to the former Coastal Manufacturing Corp. on Allender Road. An 86,000-square-foot building, which had been used to assemble modular offices, will house three fields for soccer and lacrosse, Mr. Novak said.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
The DeWees Recreation Center, in Baltimore's Govans neighborhood, is one of the oldest in the city, and it's showing its age. "It's really in need of repair," said Sandi McFadden, community leader with the group Friends of the DeWees and secretary of the Mid-Govans Community Association, which meets monthly at the center. The center, built in 1953, was recently awarded a $5,000 grant from coffee manufacturer Maxwell House through its Drops of Good: The Maxwell House Community Project program.
NEWS
May 23, 1998
BALTIMORE COUNTY is in a bind when it comes to parkland and open space.Some less-developed counties have stockpiled land for future public use. In Baltimore County, however, previous administrations failed to do this adequately. Today, there is a severe shortage of recreational facilities and open space in developed areas of the county, especially in the new communities of White Marsh, Owings Mills and still-to-be-built Honeygo. Meanwhile, land prices are bound to rise as growth areas are built out.County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger is trying to buy potential parkland.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
Catonsville residents seeking to build a community center in southwestern Baltimore County are searching for at least 5 acres that could accommodate a gymnasium, Olympic-size indoor pool, martial arts and dance studios, environmental center and skating rink.The Southwest Regional Community Center Inc. was turned down last week by the Department of Natural Resources for a proposed state-owned site near Rolling and Gun roads at Patapsco Valley State Park, a location also opposed by neighbors of the park.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 18, 1998
In a move that could help ease the shortage of recreational facilities in northwestern Baltimore County, a local developer said yesterday that ground would be broken this week for a 40,000-square-foot indoor sports arena in the Reisterstown area.The Owings Mills Sports Arena at 12400 Glynowings Drive is scheduled to open Jan. 23 for the second session of indoor winter soccer, developers say.The arena will feature two artificial-turf fields, a sports grill, a video arcade and an office for a sports medicine practitioner.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 30, 1992
The Columbia Council voted 6-3 last night to stop offering Hobbit's Glen Golf Course memberships to non-Columbia residents, saying the facility has become too crowded.It is believed to be the first time that a Columbia Council has voted to restrict use of a Columbia recreational facility to lien payers -- property owners in Columbia who pay an annual assessment to the Columbia Association, said Rob Goldman, CA vice president and director of membership services."The facilities were provided for CA people," said Councilman Charles Ahalt.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
Harford planners expect that another 30,000 homes will be built in the county by 2010 -- and homeowners will want places to play ball, hike, ride bikes and generally seek refuge from urban pressures.In response, the county is putting the finishing touches on its first comprehensive blueprint for setting aside land to meet the recreational needs of residents.The 75-page plan for providing open space, preserving natural areas and building ball fields will be the subject of public forum Wednesday.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | December 30, 1994
Columbia Association (CA) President Padraic Kennedy presented plans to the Columbia Council last night to spend $33.4 million on operations and $6 million on construction next year, including $1 million to buy land for a recreational vehicle storage facility.Mr. Kennedy called the association's fiscal 1996 spending plan a "fiscally prudent budget that continues basic services" with no increase in the annual property levy and small increases in fees for recreational facility memberships.The private association levies an annual fee on Columbia property owners to manage recreational facilities, run community programs and maintain parkland.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
The celebratory opening this month of the North Laurel Community Center shows again that government often moves slowly, but it also shows that politicians from both political parties can work toward a common goal. From idea to reality took more than two decades, and lots of pushing and pulling from civil servants and elected officials. The project, which also includes a park that is not yet ready, spanned the service of four County Council members who have represented the area and four county executives from both parties.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | August 8, 2008
Program Open Space, Maryland's nationally recognized effort to create outdoor recreational opportunities and preserve untouched lands, has been spending money on the indoors - including golf-course building renovations, community centers and an indoor aquatic center. Call it Program Enclosed Space. State auditors criticized the longstanding practice in a report yesterday on the Department of Natural Resources and said that the General Assembly's counsel advised them that the use of open-space funding for indoor recreational facilities doesn't appear to be within the law. Agency officials told auditors that they believed the indoor projects qualified for funding because the facilities accommodate recreational activities, such as swimming, that are typically done outdoors.
NEWS
By Rachel Hinson and Rachel Hinson,Special to Baltimoresun.com | February 16, 2005
For a fairly new community, having existed only since 1967, Columbia has developed quite the reputation. Known best for its streets, which are named after the works of famous writers such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Mark Twain and J.R.R. Tolkien, the area is increasingly becoming known for its unique design that incorporates 10 independent village centers. Columbia is located southwest of Baltimore City in the central region of Howard County. Bordered by Baltimore, Carroll, Montgomery, Prince George's and Anne Arundel counties, Columbia lies conveniently between the Baltimore and Washington Metropolitan areas.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Finding fields and gyms for its members has become increasingly frustrating for the Savage Boys and Girls Club. "We're maxed out," said Thomas K. Lawler, president of the 2,400-player youth group, explaining why time on parkland, public school fields and in gyms in the Savage-North Laurel area is at a premium. "They tell us, `You're lucky to get what you've got,' " Lawler said, referring to officials who schedule the fields and gyms. And Lawler, a bank vice president, expects the situation to get more frustrating as youngsters from two new large developments, Emerson and Maple Lawn Farms, start joining the club.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
A health club slated to open in Columbia's Gateway Commerce Center that will rival the size of the Columbia Association gyms is causing concerns about the financial implications for the community's recreational facilities, a major source of income for the homeowners association. Life Time Fitness, a growing health and fitness company that typically operates 150,000- square-foot facilities, has a contract to open a gym off Robert Fulton Drive late next year or in early 2006, said Dennis W. Miller, a Rouse Co. vice president and Columbia's general manager.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
In a Columbia Council election that determined the power balance of the 10-member group, a key race - Harper's Choice - was decided by two votes yesterday. In one of three contested races, Harper's Choice incumbent Wolfger Schneider narrowly beat Kathleen Larson, 277-275, in a victory for the Alliance for a Better Columbia, a citizens watchdog group . "I think my opponent ran a very strong campaign, and I'm happy to have survived it," said Schneider, who won his second two-year term. In Hickory Ridge, residents favored incumbent Miles Coffman over Fred Franklin-Campbell, 31, an adjunct history professor at Howard Community College, 189-118 . Town Center candidate Jud Malone will be the only newcomer on the council.
NEWS
December 18, 1996
TALK ABOUT NOVEL public-private partnerships: A group of local investors says it is willing to plunk down $7 million to build a complex containing a National Hockey League-size rink as well as an Olympic-size rink on 17 acres at the Lake Shore Athletic Complex, which is owned by Anne Arundel County. All it seems '' to want from the government is the land.This intriguing proposal merits serious consideration. The investors' willingness to finance the construction springs from the fact that many existing sports and recreational facilities are doing booming business in the suburbs.
NEWS
August 10, 1997
THE MEASURE OF A MAYOR often boils down to the essential. Is trash picked up on time? Are streets cleared after a heavy snowfall? Do police and firefighters respond instantly to emergencies?We need a different yardstick to assess Padraic M. Kennedy, unofficial mayor of Howard County's planned community of Columbia for the past 25 years.Trash, snow-clearing and public safety are county functions. Mr. Kennedy's role has been to make sure another level of services is in place -- recreational amenities that add to the quality of life.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2003
Members of the community gathered yesterday for the grand opening of the Norrisville Library and Recreation Center. The festivities, which began with a performance by the Norrisville Elementary School fifth-grade band, included speakers, refreshments and tours of the facility. The 13,150-square-foot building is an efficient utilization of space, said Arden McClune, chief of capital planning and development for the Harford County Department of Parks and Recreation. "More bulk for your buck," she said last week.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
A telephone survey shows that the Columbia Association may have rebounded from a period of tumultuous leadership, with slightly more than half of the town's residents responding that they're getting their money's worth from the liens they pay. Mason-Dixon Polling & Research interviewed 807 adults and found that 52 percent of Columbia residents are satisfied with the quality of the homeowners association's services that are partially funded by assessment fees....
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