Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRecreational Anglers
IN THE NEWS

Recreational Anglers

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,Department of Natural Resources, Tidewater Fisheries | November 10, 1992
Last Saturday, Maryland closed down the fall rockfish season for recreational anglers who fished from private boats or the shoreline. While the season was ended for the private fisherman, the charter-boat fishermen were allowed to continue fishing.Was the private recreational angler ripped off?According to figures from the Department of Natural Resources, they were not.However, recreational fishermen did catch more than their quota. Again.And probably that should not be too surprising, if one looks at the numbers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
In a move hailed by conservationists, East Coast regulators ordered Friday a 20 percent reduction in the commercial catch of Atlantic menhaden, despite warnings that the cutback would cost some fishermen their jobs and may affect crabbers in the Chesapeake Bay. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, meeting before a packed ballroom of partisans in a Southeast Baltimore hotel, ended years of debate over whether the fish were in trouble and...
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
As the yellow perch begin their spawning runs up Chesapeake Bay tributaries, the state is set to implement regulations to protect the species from overfishing while giving recreational anglers a greater share of the annual allocation. The rules, developed over the past year after pressure from the General Assembly, will take effect Monday. "I think we made a lot of progress," said Tom O'Connell, head of the Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service. "We learned that we have to be more conservative in management to allow the population to sustain itself and grow in time."
SPORTS
April 16, 2011
It shouldn't come as a surprise, I suppose, that the striped bass season began Saturday with uneasy folks focused on the intensity and direction of the wind. Concerns about our own health and well-being on the water aren't much different than the worries a lot of people have about the health and well-being of the fish themselves. Two decades removed from the end of the moratorium that helped bring striped bass back from the brink of extinction, there's a growing feeling that the winds have shifted and we're seeing the makings of another crash.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin DTC and Todd Richissin DTC,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1998
NORTH EAST -- Early in the 1960s, Eleanore Benjamin recalls, she and her husband, Herb, plopped down $8,000 for a boxy building on Main Street, painted their name on a shingle and declared themselves open for business.Not every town is clamoring for a business where residents can stop for a bucket of minnows and a haircut, but that is exactly what they created. And despite a couple of crises -- fishing bans and an era of longer hair -- Herb's Tackle Shop has survived.But now the Benjamins are facing something they fear they cannot overcome.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
With the regulatory clock ticking toward midnight, Maryland fisheries officials are scrambling to get recreational anglers and commercial watermen to agree on new rules to cover yellow perch fishing. Department of Natural Resources officials will meet July 28 with recreational anglers to find out what they would like to see for rules covering season length, size and daily creel limit, said Tom O'Connell, fisheries service director. The agency met with commercial netters this month. Once both sides have been polled, O'Connell said his staff will develop a management plan that satisfies a bill passed by the General Assembly last year to protect yellow perch while giving recreational anglers a bigger share of the catch.
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
The Ehrlich administration is dropping its proposal to end a 17-year moratorium on the commercial fishing of yellow perch in two Eastern Shore rivers. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources had proposed opening the Choptank and Nanticoke to commercial yellow perch fishing this spring. But after an outcry from environmentalists and recreational anglers, who said the measure would further imperil a scarce resource, department officials changed their minds. "We are withdrawing that entire package," said DNR assistant secretary Mike Slattery.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
Chesapeake Bay tributaries in the Baltimore area closed 20 years ago to protect the dwindling yellow perch population might soon be opened to recreational anglers under a blueprint being prepared by state natural resources officials. The proposal, more than 10 years in the making, is a series of mix-and-match options for anglers and commercial fishermen that covers season length, size of catch and which waterways should remain closed. The plan is in its final days of drafting, with representatives of the recreational and commercial communities weighing in. A public comment period begins next month.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
The days of free saltwater fishing in Maryland are numbered. And that will be a good thing - for the fish in the sea and future generations of anglers. The scramble is on in this state and eight others along the Eastern Seaboard to devise licensing systems that will satisfy the federal government's demand for a means to account for recreational anglers and their catches. Fourteen of the country's 23 coastal states have recreational saltwater fishing licenses or permits. For those states, the new federal law means tweaking existing regulations to meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | October 19, 1990
The 1990 recreational striped bass season is over, the charter boat season ends tomorrow evening and the commercial season will start later this year.What happened?Why was the season so short? Who caught all the fish? How many fish were caught? These are but a few of the questions I'm receiving from both recreational and charter captains. Most have adopted a cynical attitude: "the state did it to us again." I disagree.I'll admit that I do not have any of the answers, but I have talked to the Department of Natural Resources staff I have known and respected for years.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass. NRP said it shot video to prove in court that the anglers were targeting striped bass and not accidentally catching them while chasing other species.
SPORTS
March 5, 2011
Recreational anglers and state fisheries managers struck gold — literally — a few years back when they decided to work together to coax the first fish of spring back to its rightful place at the front of the calendar. Saturday, they celebrated their success. At North East Town Park, a waterfront spot in Cecil County with plenty of piers and shoreline, anglers of all ages reeled in a mess of yellow perch. These golden fish with distinctive black markings are welcomed at any fish fry. As the sun played peek-a-boo with the clouds, little guys barely bigger than a bait bucket, fashion-conscious teen-aged girls and senior citizens cast and retrieved, laughed and teased, and knocked the rust off fishing skills that most of them had put on the shelf before Thanksgiving.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | November 22, 2009
A s meetings go, Monday night's open house about proposed regulations to protect striped bass was a head scratcher. Members of the group with "conservation" in its name were saying very unconservationlike things. So were other recreational anglers. Essentially, they want to continue to harass, unencumbered by rules, egg-laden female striped bass as they swim to their spawning grounds in the upper Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in March and April. Harass is a harsh word, I know.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 13, 2009
In less than 20 feet of water, just north of where tankers and cruise ships make their slow turns from the Chesapeake Bay into the Patapsco River, lies the third rail of Maryland fishing. An oyster bar made up of millions of bushels of fossil shell sits on the bay bottom - the largest single deposit left in Maryland's portion of the bay. The state wants to restart its languishing oyster restoration program by digging up as much as 30 percent of the bar - known as Man-O-War Shoal - to serve as a foundation for a $30 million program.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
There's truth. And then there's Internet truth. There are others, such as the self-evident truths, but we'll focus on the one that has watermen, recreational anglers and charter boat captains headed for a showdown that no doubt will be refereed by Department of Natural Resources fisheries biologists. Unfortunately, even when interpreted by the well-intentioned, Internet truth can often be just one facet of the big picture. A snapshot. A drive-by glimpse. The proverbial elephant as envisioned by a group of blind men, who draw their conclusions after touching just one part of the beast.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
As the yellow perch begin their spawning runs up Chesapeake Bay tributaries, the state is set to implement regulations to protect the species from overfishing while giving recreational anglers a greater share of the annual allocation. The rules, developed over the past year after pressure from the General Assembly, will take effect Monday. "I think we made a lot of progress," said Tom O'Connell, head of the Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service. "We learned that we have to be more conservative in management to allow the population to sustain itself and grow in time."
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
The Ehrlich administration is proposing to end a 17-year moratorium on the commercial fishing of yellow perch in two Eastern Shore rivers - a proposal that is drawing criticism from environmentalists and recreational anglers who say the species is still scarce in Maryland waterways. Department of Natural Resources officials want to open the Choptank and Nanticoke rivers to commercial yellow perch fishing beginning this spring. The Nanticoke has been closed to all yellow perch fishing since 1990; the Choptank has been open to recreational anglers since 1992.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | November 22, 2009
A s meetings go, Monday night's open house about proposed regulations to protect striped bass was a head scratcher. Members of the group with "conservation" in its name were saying very unconservationlike things. So were other recreational anglers. Essentially, they want to continue to harass, unencumbered by rules, egg-laden female striped bass as they swim to their spawning grounds in the upper Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in March and April. Harass is a harsh word, I know.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
"We're going to burn your building down ... if you keep talking like that." "Let's go. Let's go outside." Each statement was made at a recent public meeting. Neither was appropriate. Each speaker owes the target a public apology. I mean, seriously, is this what we're coming to, where a forum to discuss ideas becomes a platform to bully? The first statement was made by Larry Simns, head of the Maryland Watermen's Association, to Department of Natural Resources biologist Lynn Fegley. The threat was made at a meeting of the Tidal Fish Advisory Commission during a discussion of blue crab regulations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.